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Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature

Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds -...

Price €3.00 SKU: V 22 M
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p class=""><strong>Tropical Dwarf Papaya is fast-growing papaya it only reaches 170 cm to 200 cm but bears fruits as large as 1 kg in 6-8 months from seed.</strong></p> <p>Papaya (Carica papaya L.) - Deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency, it is no wonder the papaya was reputably called the "fruit of the angels" by Christopher Columbus. Once considered quite exotic, they can now be found in markets throughout the year. Although there is a slight seasonal peak in early summer and fall, papaya trees produce fruit year-round.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are fruits that remind us of the tropics, the regions of the world in which they are grown. Once considered an exotic fruit, papayas' rise in popularity has made them much more available. Papaya fruits are good sources of Vitamin A, B, and C.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are spherical or pear-shaped fruits that can be as long as 20 inches. The ones commonly found in the market usually average about 7 inches and weigh about one pound. Their flesh is a rich orange color with either yellow or pink hues.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papaya has a wonderfully soft, butter-like consistency and a deliciously sweet, musky taste. Inside the inner cavity of the fruit are black, round seeds encased in a gelatinous-like substance. Papaya's seeds are edible, although their peppery flavor is somewhat bitter.&nbsp;</p> <p>The fruit, as well as the other parts of the papaya tree, contain papain, an enzyme that helps digest proteins. This enzyme is especially concentrated in the fruit when it is unripe. Papain is extracted to make digestive enzyme dietary supplements and is also used as an ingredient in some chewing gums.&nbsp;</p> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/indian-dwarf-papaya-seeds-paw-paw-miniature.html" target="_blank" title="How To Grow Papaya From Seed" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>How To Grow Papaya From Seed</strong></a></h2> <p>Select a sunny and sheltered place in your garden. That's right, in your garden. Don't start them in pots!</p> <p>Papayas don't transplant well. Anything that disturbs the roots of papayas really sets them back. They just hate it. The most foolproof way to grow papayas is to simply plant them where they are to live.</p> <p>Papaya trees are very, very hungry. That means they need very good soil, rich in organic matter and nutrients.</p> <p>If you don't have fabulous soil, make some. Dig a hole half a meter across and fill it with a mix of good compost and soil. Actually, make at least two or three such planting beds in different locations.</p> <p>Now sprinkle on some of your seeds. A couple of dozen per bed is a good amount. Cover the seeds lightly with more compost, and then mulch the patch well. The seeds usually take about a couple of weeks to germinate and may take longer.</p> <p>Soon you will notice that your seedlings are very different in size and vigor. That's why we planted so many. Start culling the weaker ones. Pull them out while still small, or cut bigger ones down to the ground. Only keep the very best.</p> <p>At this stage, you should keep about half a dozen plants. Papaya plants can be male, female, or bisexual, and you want to make sure that you have some females or bisexual plants amongst your seedlings. The male papayas don't bear fruit.</p> <p>Papayas start flowering when they are about one meter tall. The male's flower first. Male flowers have long, thin stalks with several small blooms. Female flowers are usually single blooms, bigger, and very close to the trunk.&nbsp;</p> <p>Cull most of the male plants. You only need one male for every ten to fifteen female plants to ensure good pollination.</p> <p>And that's it. You should end up with one very strong and healthy female plant per bed. (And a male plant somewhere...) If the weather is warm enough, and if you are growing your papayas in full sun and in good soil, then you could be picking the first ripe fruit within 10 months.</p> <h3>How much water?</h3> <p>Papayas have large soft leaves. They evaporate a lot of water in warm weather, so they need a lot of water. But unfortunately, papayas are very susceptible to root rot, especially in cool weather. Overwatering is the most common reason for problems when growing papayas.</p> <p>It depends on the temperature and on the overall health and vigor of the plant. A healthier plant will cope better, but in general, you should be careful not to overwater during periods of cool weather.</p> <h3>Growing Papaya In Cooler Climates</h3> <p>If you get at least long hot summers you could grow papaya just as an ornamental plant. In this case, you would start them in a pot indoors to gain extra time. Plant them out against a sun-facing wall and enjoy the tropical look. However, you won't be able to keep your papaya alive long enough to get fruit.</p> <p>The only other option is growing papaya in a huge pot, and to keep the pot in a heated greenhouse in winter. You may also grow papaya as an annual decorative plant.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 22 M
Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11

Giant Water Lily Lotus...

Price €2.25 SKU: F 78
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0606; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Queen of the water lilies, this Amazonian giant has a remarkable life cycle.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica is well known for its huge circular leaves, which are often pictured with a small child sitting supported in the centre as a demonstration of their size and strength. The species is highly prized as an ornamental, despite having somewhat particular requirements for successful cultivation.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica seeds from Thailand that have a perfectly can grow every weather that have a very big size most 3.5 metre. The seeds very fresh easy for grow the most quality 85%. Every seeds had quality cue in with thoroughly.</span></p> <h2><span>How To Grow Victoria amazonica Seeds</span></h2> <p><span>Put the seeds in to washtub and wait 5 weeks.</span></p> <p><span>When the roots thrown out and flowers thrive then after that put the underground and wait for until the lotus grow up.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>WIKIPEDIA:</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Victoria amazonica is a species of flowering plant, the largest of the Nymphaeaceae family of water lilies. It is the National flower of Guyana.</span></p> <p><span>The species has very large leaves, up to 3 m in diameter, that float on the water's surface on a submerged stalk, 7–8 m in length. The species was once called Victoria regia after Queen Victoria, but the name was superseded. V. amazonica is native to the shallow waters of the Amazon River basin, such as oxbow lakes and bayous. It is depicted in the Guyanese coat of arms. The flowers are white the first night they are open and become pink the second night. They are up to 40 cm in diameter, and are pollinated by beetles. This process was described in detail by Sir Ghillean Prance and Jorge Arius.[4][5]It is the largest waterlily in the world.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Classification</span></strong></p> <p><span>A member of the genus Victoria placed in the Nymphaeaceae family or, sometimes, in the Euryalaceae.[6] The first published description of the genus was by John Lindley in October 1837, based on specimens of this plant returned from British Guiana by Robert Schomburgk. Lindley named the genus after the newly ascended Queen Victoria, and the species Victoria regia.[1] The spelling in Schomburgk's description in Athenaeum, published the month before, was given as Victoria Regina.[2] Despite this spelling being adopted by the Botanical Society of London for their new emblem, Lindley's was the version used throughout the nineteenth century.</span></p> <p><span>An earlier account of the species, Euryale amazonica by Eduard Friedrich Poeppig, in 1832 described an affinity with Euryale ferox. A collection and description was also made by the French botanist Aimé Bonpland in 1825.[1][1][8] In 1850 James De Carle Sowerby[9] recognised Poeppig's earlier description and transferred its epithet amazonica. The new name was rejected by Lindley. The current name, Victoria amazonica, did not come into widespread use until the twentieth century.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>Victoria regia, as it was named, was discovered by Tadeáš Haenke in 1801.[10] It was once the subject of rivalry between Victorian gardeners in England. Always on the look out for a spectacular new species with which to impress their peers, Victorian "Gardeners"[11] such as the Duke of Devonshire, and the Duke of Northumberland started a well-mannered competition to become the first to cultivate and bring to flower this enormous lily. In the end, the two aforementioned Dukes became the first to achieve this, Joseph Paxton (for the Duke of Devonshire) being the first in November 1849 by replicating the lily's warm swampy habitat (not easy in winter in England with only coal-fired boilers for heating), and a "Mr Ivison" the second and more constantly successful (for Northumberland) at Syon House.</span></p> <p><span>The species captured the imagination of the public, and was the subject of several dedicated monographs. The botanical illustrations of cultivated specimens in Fitch and W.J. Hooker's 1851 work Victoria Regia[12] received critical acclaim in the Athenaeum, "they are accurate, and they are beautiful".[13] The Duke of Devonshire presented Queen Victoria with one of the first of these flowers, and named it in her honour. The lily, with ribbed undersurface and leaves veining "like transverse girders and supports", was Paxton's inspiration for The Crystal Palace, a building four times the size of St. Peter's in Rome.</span></p> <h2><strong>Video:</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #fc0303;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkI9-rhumbs" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #fc0303;">How To Grow Lotus From Seeds </span></a></span><br /></strong></h2> </body> </html>
F 78
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11
Velvet Bean Seeds (Mucuna...

Velvet Bean Seeds (Mucuna...

Price €2.85 SKU: P 88 MP
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Velvet Bean Seeds (Mucuna pruriens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>We have in offer Mucuna pruriens with white and black seeds. Choose under the color option seeds color.</b></i></p> <p><i><b>Mucuna pruriens</b></i><span> is a tropical </span>legume<span> native to Africa and tropical Asia and widely naturalized and cultivated.</span><sup id="cite_ref-GRIN_2-0" class="reference"></sup><span> Its English </span>common names<span> include </span><b>monkey tamarind</b><span>, </span><b>velvet bean</b><span>, </span><b>Bengal velvet bean</b><span>, </span><b>Florida velvet bean</b><span>, </span><b>Mauritius velvet bean</b><span>, </span><b>Yokohama velvet bean</b><span>, </span><b>cowage</b><span>, </span><b>cowitch</b><span>, </span><b>lacuna bean</b><span>, and </span><b>Lyon bean</b><span>.</span><sup id="cite_ref-GRIN_2-1" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> The plant is notorious for the extreme itchiness it produces on contact,</span><sup id="cite_ref-ReferenceA_3-0" class="reference"></sup><span> particularly with the young foliage and the seed pods. It has agricultural and horticultural value and is used in </span>herbalism<span>.</span></p> <p>The plant is an annual climbing shrub with long vines that can reach over 15 metres (50 ft) in length. When the plant is young, it is almost completely covered with fuzzy hairs, but when older, it is almost completely free of hairs. The leaves are tripinnate, ovate, reverse ovate,<span> </span>rhombus-shaped or widely ovate. The sides of the leaves are often heavily grooved and the tips are pointy. In young<span> </span><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>plants, both sides of the leaves have hairs. The stems of the leaflets are two to three millimeters long (approximately one tenth of an inch). Additional adjacent leaves are present and are about 5 millimetres (0.2 in) long.</p> <p>The flower heads take the form of axially arrayed<span> </span>panicles. They are 15–32 centimetres (6–13 in) long and have two or three, or many flowers. The accompanying leaves are about 12.5 millimetres (0.5 in) long, the flower stand axes are from 2.5–5 millimetres (0.1–0.2 in). The bell is 7.5–9 millimetres (0.3–0.4 in) long and silky. The<span> </span>sepals<span> </span>are longer or of the same length as the shuttles. The crown is purplish or white. The flag is 1.5 millimetres (0.06 in) long. The wings are 2.5–3.8 centimetres (1.0–1.5 in) long.</p> <p>In the fruit-ripening stage, a 4–13 centimetres (2–5 in) long, 1–2 centimetres (0.4–0.8 in) wide, unwinged, leguminous fruit develops. There is a ridge along the length of the fruit. The husk is very hairy and carries up to seven seeds. The seeds are flattened uniform ellipsoids, 1–1.9 centimetres (0.4–0.7 in) long, .8–1.3 centimetres (0.3–0.5 in) wide and 4–6.5 centimetres (2–3 in) thick. The<span> </span><i>hilum</i>, the base of the<span> </span><i>funiculus</i><span> </span>(connection between placenta and plant seeds) is a surrounded by a significant<span> </span><i>arillus</i><span> </span>(fleshy seed shell).</p> <p><i>M.pruriens</i><span> </span>bears white, lavender, or purple<span> </span>flowers. Its seed pods are about 10 cm (4 inches) long<sup id="cite_ref-Rätsch_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>and are covered in loose, orange hairs that cause a severe itch if they come in contact with skin. The itch is caused by a protein known as<span> </span>mucunain.<sup id="cite_ref-Reddy_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>The seeds are shiny black or brown<span> </span>drift seeds.</p> <p>The dry weight of the seeds is 55–85 grams (2–3 oz)/100 seeds.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>In many parts of the world,<span> </span><i>Mucuna pruriens</i><span> </span>is used as an important<span> </span>forage,<span> </span>fallow<span> </span>and<span> </span>green manure<span> </span>crop.<span> </span>Since the plant is a<span> </span>legume, it<span> </span>fixes nitrogen<span> </span>and fertilizes soil. In<span> </span>Indonesia, particularly<span> </span>Java, the beans are eaten and widely known as 'Benguk'. The beans can also be fermented to form a food similar to<span> </span>tempe<span> </span>and known as<span> </span>Benguk tempe<span> </span>or 'tempe Benguk'.</p> <p><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>is a widespread fodder plant in the tropics. To that end, the whole plant is fed to animals as<span> </span>silage, dried hay or dried seeds.<span> </span><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>silage contains 11-23% crude protein, 35-40% crude fiber, and the dried beans 20-35% crude protein. It also has use in the countries of<span> </span>Benin<span> </span>and<span> </span>Vietnam<span> </span>as a biological control for problematic<span> </span><i>Imperata cylindrica</i><span> </span>grass.<sup id="cite_ref-tropical_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>is said to not be invasive outside its cultivated area.<sup id="cite_ref-tropical_7-2" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>However, the plant is invasive within conservation areas of South Florida, where it frequently invades disturbed land and<span> </span>rockland hammock<span> </span>edge habitats. Cooked fresh shoots or beans can also be eaten. The plant contains relatively high (3–7% dry weight) levels of<span> </span>L-DOPA; some people are sensitive to L-DOPA and may experience nausea, vomiting, cramping, arrhythmias, and hypotension. Up to 88% of the L-DOPA can be extracted from<span> </span><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>by boiling and soaking for approximately 48 hours. The efficiency of the process can be slightly improved by using approximately 0.25-0.50% sodium bicarbonate.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Traditional_medicine">Traditional medicine</span></h3> <p>The seeds of<span> </span><i>Mucuna pruriens</i><span> </span>have been used for treating many dysfunctions in Tibb-e-Unani (Unani Medicine).<sup id="cite_ref-Amin_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>It is also used in<span> </span>Ayurvedic medicine.</p> <p>The plant and its extracts have been long used in tribal communities as a toxin antagonist for various snakebites. It has been studied for its effects against bites by<span> </span><i>Naja</i><span> </span>spp. (cobra),<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup><span> </span><i>Echis</i><span> </span>(Saw scaled viper),<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span><i>Calloselasma</i><span> </span>(Malayan Pit viper) and<span> </span><i>Bangarus</i><span> </span>(Krait).<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (November 2019)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <p>It has long been used in traditional<span> </span>Ayurvedic<span> </span>Indian medicine in an attempt to treat diseases including<span> </span>Parkinson's disease.<sup id="cite_ref-DoubleBlind_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>It has been investigated in low income regions of the world as an alternative treatment for Parkinson's disease due to its high content of<span> </span>L-dopa.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup><span> </span>Mucuna prurien seeds have been recognized for their ability to significantly alleviate neurotoxocity induced by Parkinson's disease.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <p>Dried leaves of<span> </span><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>are sometimes smoked.<sup id="cite_ref-Rätsch_4-1" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Itch-inducing_properties">Itch-inducing properties</span></h2> <p>The hairs lining the seed pods contain<span> </span>serotonin<span> </span>and the protein<span> </span>mucunain<span> </span>which cause severe<span> </span>itching<span> </span>when the pods are touched.<sup id="cite_ref-ReferenceA_3-1" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-toxicology_15-0" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>The calyx below the flowers is also a source of itchy spicules and the stinging hairs on the outside of the seed pods are used in some brands of<span> </span>itching powder.<sup id="cite_ref-ReferenceA_3-2" class="reference">[3]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-joglekar_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup><span> </span>Scratching the exposed area can spread the itching to other areas touched. Once this happens, the subject tends to scratch vigorously and uncontrollably and for this reason the local populace in northern Mozambique refer to the beans as "mad beans" (<i>feijões malucos</i>). The seed pods are known as "Devil Beans" in Nigeria.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Pharmacology">Pharmacology</span></h2> <p>The seeds of the plant contain about 3.1–6.1%<span> </span>L-DOPA,<sup id="cite_ref-toxicology_15-1" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>with trace amounts of<span> </span>serotonin,<span> </span>nicotine, and<span> </span>bufotenine.<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>One study using 36 samples of seeds found no<span> </span>tryptamines<span> </span>present.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup><span> </span><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>pruriens</i><span> </span>has the highest content of L-dopa. An average of 52.11% degradation of L-dopa into damaging<span> </span>quinones<span> </span>and reactive oxygen species was found in seeds of<span> </span><i>M. pruriens</i><span> </span>varieties.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 178 B (5 S)
Velvet Bean Seeds (Mucuna pruriens)

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds...

Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds...

Price €2.55 SKU: V 197 BS
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds (Prunus domestica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 5 (6,5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This variety is from Bosnia, and very resistant to diseases. We came across this plum by chance at a farmer's yard and were immediately amazed by both the size and taste of this variety.</p> <p>Unfortunately, the owner did not know what the name of the variety was, he only knew how to tell us that this plum variety was planted by his great-grandfather and that since then this plum has been kept and planted regularly so that this variety spreads and preserves as much as possible.</p> <p>We asked him how this plum tolerates winter and low temperatures, and he answered that the temperature in their village drops to minus 24 degrees Celsius, and this was no problem for this plum.</p> <p>The fruits are really huge and weigh an average of 70 to 85 grams per fruit.</p> <p>A plum is a fruit of the subgenus Prunus of the genus Prunus. The subgenus is distinguished from other subgenera (peaches, cherries, bird cherries, etc.) in the shoots having terminal bud and solitary side buds (not clustered), the flowers in groups of one to five together on short stems, and the fruit having a groove running down one side and a smooth stone (or pit).</p> <p>Mature plum fruit may have a dusty-white waxy coating that gives them a glaucous appearance. This is an epicuticular wax coating and is known as "wax bloom". Dried plum fruits are called dried plums or prunes, although, in American English, prunes are a distinct type of plum, and may have pre-dated the fruits now commonly known as plums.</p> <p>Typically it forms a large shrub or a small tree. It may be somewhat thorny, with white blossom, borne in early spring. The oval or spherical fruit varies in size, but can be up to 8 cm across, and is usually sweet (dessert plum), though some varieties are sour and require cooking with sugar to make them palatable. Like all Prunus fruits, it contains a single large seed, usually called a stone, which is discarded when eating.</p> <p>Plums are grown commercially in orchards, but modern rootstocks, together with self-fertile strains, training and pruning methods, allow single plums to be grown in relatively small spaces. Their early flowering and fruiting means that they require a sheltered spot away from frosts and cold winds.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>The taste of the plum fruit ranges from sweet to tart; the skin itself may be particularly tart. It is juicy and can be eaten fresh or used in jam-making or other recipes. Plum juice can be fermented into plum wine. In central England, a cider-like alcoholic beverage known as plum jerkum is made from plums.</p> <p>Dried plums (or prunes) are also sweet and juicy and contain several antioxidants. Plums and prunes are known for their laxative effect. This effect has been attributed to various compounds present in the fruits, such as dietary fiber, sorbitol,[7] and isatin.[8] Prunes and prune juice are often used to help regulate the functioning of the digestive system. Dried prune marketers in the US have, in recent years, begun marketing their product as "dried plums". This is due to "prune" having negative connotations connected with elderly people suffering from constipation.</p> <p>Dried, salted plums are used as a snack, sometimes known as saladito or salao. Various flavors of dried plum are available at Chinese grocers and specialty stores worldwide. They tend to be much drier than the standard prune. Cream, ginseng, spicy, and salty are among the common varieties. Licorice is generally used to intensify the flavor of these plums and is used to make salty plum drinks and toppings for shaved ice or baobing.</p> <p>Pickled plums are another type of preserve available in Asia and international specialty stores. The Japanese variety, called umeboshi, is often used for rice balls, called onigiri or omusubi. The ume, from which umeboshi are made, is more closely related, however, to the apricot than to the plum.</p> <p>As with many other members of the rose family, plum seeds contain cyanogenic glycosides, including amygdalin.[10] These substances are capable of decomposing into a sugar molecule and hydrogen cyanide gas. While plum seeds are not the most toxic within the rose family (the bitter almond is the most toxic[citation needed]), large doses of these chemicals from any source are hazardous to human health. On the other hand, plums are considered a source of phytochemical compounds with beneficial effects on health.</p> <p>Prune kernel oil is made from the fleshy inner part of the pit of the plum.</p> <p>Plums come in a wide variety of colours and sizes. Some are much firmer-fleshed than others, and some have yellow, white, green or red flesh, with equally varying skin colour.</p> <p>Though not available commercially, the wood of plum trees is used by hobbyists and other private woodworkers for musical instruments, knife handles, inlays, and similar small projects.</p> <p>When it flowers in the early spring, a plum tree will be covered in blossoms, and in a good year approximately 50% of the flowers will be pollinated and become plums. Flowering starts after 80 growing degree days.</p> <p>If the weather is too dry, the plums will not develop past a certain stage, but will fall from the tree while still tiny, green buds, and if it is unseasonably wet or if the plums are not harvested as soon as they are ripe, the fruit may develop a fungal condition called brown rot. Brown rot is not toxic, and very small affected areas can be cut out of the fruit, but unless the rot is caught immediately, the fruit will no longer be edible. Plum is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera, including November moth, willow beauty and short-cloaked moth.</p> <p><strong>The Serbian plum (Serbian: шљива / šljiva) is the third most produced in the world. In the Balkans, plum is converted into an alcoholic drink named slivovitz (plum brandy) (Serbian: шљивовица / šljivovica).</strong></p> <p>A large number of plums, of the Damson variety, are also grown in Hungary, where they are called szilva and are used to make lekvar (a plum paste jam), palinka (traditional fruit brandy), plum dumplings, and other foods. The region of Szabolcs-Szatmár, in the northeastern part of the country near the borders with Ukraine and Romania, is a major producer of plums.</p> <p>The plum blossom or meihua (Chinese: 梅花; pinyin: méihuā), along with the peony, are considered traditional floral emblems of China.</p> <p>The plum is commonly used in China, Yunnan area, to produce a local plum wine with a smooth, sweet, fruity taste and approximately 12% alcohol by volume.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 197 BS (6,5g)
Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds (Prunus domestica)
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo...

Price €1.95 SKU: B 6
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys bambusoides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly called madake, giant timber bamboo or Japanese timber bamboo, is a bamboo species in the genus Phyllostachys.</p> <p>Madake is typically known for being the most common type of bamboo used in the making of shakuhachi flutes and is utilized in numerous Japanese, as well as Chinese, arts, and crafts.</p> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides can reach a height of 15–22 m and a diameter of 10–15 cm. The culms are dark green, quite thick and very straight. The leaves are dark green. New stalks emerge in late spring and grow quite rapidly, up to 1 meter each day. The flowering interval of this species is very long, about 120 years. This strong plant is in Asia one of the preferred bamboos for building and in the manufacture of furniture.</p> <p>This species is native to China, but it is commonly grown worldwide, especially in Japan.</p> </body> </html>
B 6 (5 S)
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3
Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Price €1.70 SKU: MHS 150
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 250-300 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Kupusinski jabučar is old Serbian variety, and one of the favorite old varieties The fruit bulb is apple-shaped (hence the name Kupusinski jabučar), with a solid, well-closed neck. Sheath leaves are dark yellow in color. This variety can be stored for a long time, without to lose taste.</p> <p>"Kupusinski jabučar" translated to English "Apple Onion aus Kupusina" (Kupusina is Village in Serbia).</p> <p>The medium-hot variety is grown successfully from seeds. The average mass of the fruit bulb is 80-120 g. </p> <p>The dry matter content is 12-14%. It yields about 300 mc/ha.</p> <p> <script type="text/javascript"></script> </p>
MHS 150 (100 S)
Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar
Yellow Sweet cherry Seeds(Prunus avium) 2.05 - 1

Yellow Sweet cherry...

Price €2.05 SKU: V 148
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Yellow Sweet cherry Seeds (Prunus avium)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Dönissens Gelbe is a super sweet and aromatic variety of yellow sweet cherries from Germany. It produces masses of medium-sized, juicy fruit in July. Its colour brings one advantage – it is usually untouched by birds ..</p>
V 148
Yellow Sweet cherry Seeds(Prunus avium) 2.05 - 1

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Roselle Seeds...

Giant Roselle Seeds...

Price €2.75 SKU: MHS 19 G
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2 class=""><b>Giant Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus sabdariffa)</b></h2> <h2 class=""><strong style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 2rem;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></h2> <p><strong>The fruits of this roselle are twice as big as any other roselle.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>The roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a species of Hibiscus native to the Old World tropics, used for the production of bast fiber and as an infusion. It is an annual or perennial herb or woody-based subshrub, growing to 2–2.5 m (7–8 ft) tall. The leaves are deeply three- to five-lobed, 8–15 cm (3–6 in) long, arranged alternately on the stems.</p> </div> <p>The flowers are 8–10 cm (3–4 in) in diameter, white to pale yellow with a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and have a stout fleshy calyx at the base, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) wide, enlarging to 3–3.5 cm (1.2–1.4 in), fleshy and bright red as the fruit matures. It takes about six months to mature.</p> <p><span><strong>Names</strong></span></p> <p><span>The roselle is known as the rosella or rosella fruit in Australia. It is also known as 'Belchanda' among Nepalese, Tengamora among Assamese and "mwitha" among Bodo tribals in Assam, চুকর Chukor in Bengali, Gongura in Telugu, Pundi in Kannada, Ambadi in Marathi, LalChatni or Kutrum in Mithila] Mathipuli in Kerala, chin baung in Burma, กระเจี๊ยบแดง KraJiabDaeng in Thailand, ສົ້ມ ພໍດີ som phor dee in Lao PDR, bissap in Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and Niger, the Congo and France, dah or dah bleni in other parts of Mali, wonjo in the Gambia, zobo in western Nigeria (the Yorubas in Nigeria call the white variety Isapa (pronounced Ishapa)), Zoborodo in Northern Nigeria, Chaye-Torosh in Iran, karkade (كركديه; Arabic pronunciation: [ˈkarkade])[dubious – discuss] in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Sudan, omutete in Namibia, sorrel in the Caribbean and in Latin America, Flor de Jamaica in Mexico, Saril in Panama, grosella in Paraguay and vinagreira, caruru-azedo or quiabo-roxo in Brazil. Rosela in Indonesia, asam belanda[1] in Malaysia. In Chinese it is 洛神花 (Luo Shen Hua) . In Zambia the plant is called lumanda in ciBemba, katolo in kiKaonde, or wusi in chiLunda.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plant is considered to have antihypertensive properties. In some places, the plant is primarily cultivated for the production of bast fibre from the stem of the plant. The fibre may be used as a substitute for jute in making burlap.[2] Hibiscus, specifically Roselle, has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild laxative, and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and cancer.[3]</span></p> <p><span>The red calyces of the plant are increasingly exported to America and Europe, where they are used as food colourings. Germany is the main importer. It can also be found in markets (as flowers or syrup) in some places such as France, where there are Senegalese immigrant communities. The green leaves are used like a spicy version of spinach. They give flavour to the Senegalese fish and rice dish thiéboudieune. Proper records are not kept, but the Senegalese government estimates national production and consumption at 700 t (770 short tons) per year. Also in Burma their green leaves are the main ingredient in making chin baung kyaw curry.</span></p> <p><span>In East Africa, the calyx infusion, called "Sudan tea", is taken to relieve coughs. Roselle juice, with salt, pepper, asafoetida and molasses, is taken as a remedy for biliousness.</span></p> <p><span>The heated leaves are applied to cracks in the feet and on boils and ulcers to speed maturation. A lotion made from leaves is used on sores and wounds. The seeds are said to be diuretic and tonic in action and the brownish-yellow seed oil is claimed to heal sores on camels. In India, a decoction of the seeds is given to relieve dysuria, strangury and mild cases of dyspepsia. Brazilians attribute stomachic, emollient and resolutive properties to the bitter roots.[4]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Leafy vegetable/Greens</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Andhra cuisine, Hibiscus cannabinus, called Gongura, is extensively used. The leaves are steamed along with lentils and cooked with Dal. The other unique dish prepared is gongura pachadi, it is prepared by mixing fried leaves with spices and made into a Gongura Pacchadi, the most famous dish of Andhra cuisine and is often described as king of all foods of Andhra ethnics(andhrulu)</span></p> <p><span>In Burmese cuisine, called chin baung ywet (lit. sour leaf), the roselle is widely used and considered an affordable vegetable for the population. It is perhaps the most widely eaten and popular vegetable in Burma.[5] The leaves are fried with garlic, dried or fresh prawns and green chili or cooked with fish. A light soup made from roselle leaves and dried prawn stock is also a popular dish.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Beverage</strong></span></p> <p><span>Cuisine: Among the Bodo tribals of Bodoland, Assam (India) the leaves of both hibiscus sabdariffa and hibiscus cannabinus are cooked along with chicken, fish or pork, one of their traditional cuisines</span></p> <p><span>In the Caribbean sorrel drink is made from sepals of the roselle. In Malaysia, roselle calyces are harvested fresh to produce pro-health drink due to high contents of vitamin C and anthocyanins. In Mexico, 'agua de Flor de Jamaica' (water flavored with roselle) frequently called "agua de Jamaica" is most often homemade. Also, since many untrained consumers mistake the calyces of the plant to be dried flowers, it is widely, but erroneously, believed that the drink is made from the flowers of the non-existent "Jamaica plant". It is prepared by boiling dried sepals and calyces of the Sorrel/Flower of Jamaica plant in water for 8 to 10 minutes (or until the water turns red), then adding sugar. It is often served chilled. This is also done in Saint Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago where it is called 'sorrel'. The drink is one of several inexpensive beverages (aguas frescas) commonly consumed in Mexico and Central America, and they are typically made from fresh fruits, juices or extracts. A similar thing is done in Jamaica but additional flavor is added by brewing the tea with ginger and adding rum. It is a popular drink of the country at Christmas time. It is also very popular in Trinidad &amp; Tobago but cinnamon, cloves and bay leaves are preferred to ginger. In Mali, Senegal, The Gambia, Burkina Faso and Benin calyces are used to prepare cold, sweet drinks popular in social events, often mixed with mint leaves, dissolved menthol candy, and/or various fruit flavors. The Middle Eastern and Sudanese drink "Karkade"(كركديه) is a cold drink made by soaking the dried Karkade flowers in cold water over night in a refrigerator with sugar and some lemon or lime juice added.It is then consumed with or without ice cubes after the flowers have been strained.In Lebanon, sometimes toasted pine nuts are tossed into the drink.</span></p> <p><span>With the advent in the U.S. of interest in south-of-the-border cuisine, the calyces are sold in bags usually labeled "Flor de Jamaica" and have long been available in health food stores in the U.S. for making a tea that is high in vitamin C. This drink is particularly good for people who have a tendency, temporary or otherwise, toward water retention: it is a mild diuretic.</span></p> <p><span>In addition to being a popular homemade drink, Jarritos, a popular brand of Mexican soft drinks, makes a Flor de Jamaica flavored carbonated beverage. Imported Jarritos can be readily found in the U.S.</span></p> <p><span>In the UK the dried calyces and ready-made sorrel syrup are widely and cheaply available in Caribbean and Asian grocers. The fresh calyces are imported mainly during December and January in order to make Christmas and New Year infusions, which are often made into cocktails with additional rum. They are very perishable, rapidly developing fungal rot, and need to be used soon after purchase – unlike the dried product, which has a long shelf-life.</span></p> <p><span>In Africa, especially the Sahel, roselle is commonly used to make a sugary herbal tea that is commonly sold on the street. The dried flowers can be found in every market. Roselle tea is also quite common in Italy where it spread during the first decades of the 20th century as a typical product of the Italian colonies. The Carib Brewery Trinidad Limited, a Trinidad and Tobago brewery, produces a Shandy Sorrel in which the tea is combined with beer.</span></p> <p><span>In Thailand, Roselle is generally drunk as a cool drink,[6] but also as a tea, believed to also reduce cholesterol. It can also be made into a wine.</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus flowers are commonly found in commercial herbal teas, especially teas advertised as berry-flavoured, as they give a bright red colouring to the drink.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella flowers are sold as Wild Hibiscus flowers in syrup in Australia as a gourmet product. Recipes include filling them with goats cheese, serving them on baguette slices baked with brie, &amp; placing one plus a little syrup, in a champagne flute before adding the champagne when the bubbles cause the flower to open.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Jam and preserves</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Nigeria, rosella jam has been made since Colonial times and is still sold regularly at community fetes and charity stalls. It is similar in flavour to plum jam, although more acidic. It differs from other jams in that the pectin is obtained from boiling the interior buds of the rosella flowers. It is thus possible to make rosella jam with nothing but rosella buds and sugar. Roselle is also used in Nigeria to make a refreshing drink known as Zobo.</span></p> <p><span>In Burma, the buds of the roselle are made into 'preserved fruits' or jams. Depending on the method and the preference, the seeds are either removed or included. The jams, made from roselle buds and sugar, are red and tangy.</span></p> <p><span>"Sorrel jelly" is manufactured in Trinidad.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella Jam is also made in Queensland, Australia as a home-made or speciality product sold at fetes and other community events.[7]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Medicinal uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>Many parts of the plant are also claimed to have various medicinal values. They have been used for such purposes ranging from Mexico through Africa and India to Thailand. Roselle is associated with traditional medicine and is reported to be used as treatment for several diseases such as hypertension and urinary tract infections.[8]</span></p> <p><span>Although Roselle has well documented hypotensive effects,[9] there is currently insufficient evidence to support the benefit of Roselle for either controlling or lowering blood pressure due to a lack of well designed studies that measure the efficacy of Roselle on patients with hypertension.[10]</span></p> <p><span>A double blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial was conducted to determine the effect of Roselle leaf extract on a group of 60 subjects with serum LDL values in the range of 130-190 ml/dl (&lt;130 ml/dl is a goal value for most patients[11]) and no history of coronary heart disease. The experimental group received 1g of Roselle leaf extract while the placebo group received a similar amount of maltodextrin in addition to dietary and physical activity advice. Both groups had decreases in body weight, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides that can likely be attributed to the dietary and physical activity advice. At a dose of 1g/day, Roselle leaf extract did not appear to have a blood lipid lowering effect.[12]</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus sabdariffa has shown in vitro antimicrobial activity against E. coli.[13] A recent review stated that specific extracts of H. sabdariffa exhibit activities against atherosclerosis, liver disease, cancer, diabetes and other metabolic syndromes.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Phytochemicals</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plants are rich in anthocyanins, as well as protocatechuic acid. The dried calyces contain the flavonoids gossypetin, hibiscetine and sabdaretine. The major pigment, formerly reported as hibiscin, has been identified as daphniphylline. Small amounts of myrtillin (delphinidin 3-monoglucoside), Chrysanthenin (cyanidin 3-monoglucoside), and delphinidin are also present. Roselle seeds are a good source of lipid-soluble antioxidants, particularly gamma-tocopherol.[15]</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Production</strong></span></p> <p><span>China and Thailand are the largest producers and control much of the world supply. Thailand invested heavily in roselle production and their product is of superior quality, whereas China's product, with less stringent quality control practices, is less reliable and reputable. The world's best roselle comes from the Sudan, but the quantity is low and poor processing hampers quality. Mexico, Egypt, Senegal, Tanzania, Mali and Jamaica are also important suppliers but production is mostly used domestically.[16]</span></p> <p><span>In the Indian subcontinent (especially in the Ganges Delta region), roselle is cultivated for vegetable fibres. Roselle is called meśta (or meshta, the ś indicating an sh sound) in the region. Most of its fibres are locally consumed. However, the fibre (as well as cuttings or butts) from the roselle plant has great demand in various natural fibre using industries.</span></p> <p><span>Roselle is a relatively new crop to create an industry in Malaysia. It was introduced in early 1990s and its commercial planting was first promoted in 1993 by the Department of Agriculture in Terengganu. The planted acreage was 12.8 ha (30 acres) in 1993, but had steadily increased to peak at 506 ha (1,000 acres) in 2000. The planted area is now less than 150 ha (400 acres) annually, planted with two main varieties.[citation needed] Terengganu state used to be the first and the largest producer, but now the production has spread more to other states. Despite the dwindling hectarage over the past decade or so, roselle is becoming increasingly known to the general population as an important pro-health drink in the country. To a small extent, the calyces are also processed into sweet pickle, jelly and jam. jimmon rubillos</span></p> <p><span><strong>Crop research</strong></span></p> <p><span>In the initial years, limited research work were conducted by University Malaya (UM) and Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI). Research work at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) was initiated in 1999. In many respect, the amount of research work is still considered meagre in supporting a growing roselle industry in Malaysia.</span></p> <p><span>Crop genetic resources &amp; improvement[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase the crop productivity. Being an introduced species in Malaysia, there is a very limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. At present, UKM maintains a working germplasm collection, and also conducts agronomic research and crop improvement.</span></p> <p><span>Mutation breeding[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase its productivity. Being an introduced crop species in Malaysia, there is a limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. Furthermore, conventional hybridization is difficult to carry out in roselle due to its cleistogamous nature of reproduction. Because of this, a mutation breeding programme was initiated to generate new genetic variability.[17] The use of induced mutations for its improvement was initiated in 1999 in cooperation with MINT (now called Malaysian Nuclear Agency), and has produced some promising breeding lines. Roselle is a tetraploid species; thus, segregating populations require longer time to achieve fixation as compared to diploid species. In April 2009, UKM launched three new varieties named UKMR-1, UKMR-2 and UKMR-3, respectively. These three new varieties were developed using variety Arab as the parent variety in a mutation breeding programme which started in 2006.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Natural outcrossing under local conditions</strong></span></p> <p><span>A study was conducted to estimate the amount of outcrossing under local conditions in Malaysia. It was found that outcrossing occurred at a very low rate of about 0.02%. However, this rate is much lower in comparison to estimates of natural cross-pollination of between 0.20% and 0.68% as reported in Jamaica.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Source: Wikipedia</strong></span></p>
MHS 19 G (5 S)
Giant Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus sabdariffa)
Bergamot Orange Seeds...

Bergamot Orange Seeds...

Price €3.50 SKU: V 21 CB
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Bergamot Orange Seeds (Citrus bergamia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 4 Seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Citrus bergamia, the bergamot orange, is a fragrant citrus fruit the size of an orange, with a yellow or green color similar to a lime, depending on ripeness.</p> <p>Citrus bergamia is a small tree that blossoms during the winter. The juice tastes less sour than lemon but more bitter than grapefruit.</p> <p>Oil from the peel of the fruit, and extract from the fruit juice, are used to make medicine. Bergamot is used for high levels of cholesterol or other fats (lipids) in the blood (hyperlipidemia).</p> <p>An essence extracted from the aromatic skin of this sour fruit is used to flavor Earl Grey and Lady Grey teas,[10] as well as confectionery (including Turkish delight[16]). It is often used to make marmalade, particularly in Italy. In Sweden and Norway, bergamot is a very common flavorant in snus, a smokeless tobacco product.[17] Likewise, in dry nasal snuff, it is also a common aroma in traditional blends.</p> <p>In France, particularly the Ardennes region and the city of Nancy, essential oils made from the fruit are used to make a square, flat candy called the "Bergamote de Nancy".<br />Bergamot oil is one of the most commonly used ingredients in perfumery. It is prized for its ability to combine with an array of scents to form a bouquet of aromas that complement each other. Bergamot is a major component of the original Eau de Cologne composed by Jean-Marie Farina at the beginning of the 18th century in Germany. The first use of bergamot oil as a fragrance ingredient was recorded in 1714 and can be found in the Farina Archive in Cologne. However, much "Bergamot oil" is today derived instead from eau de Cologne mint, also known as bergamot mint, which is a variety of water mint and is unrelated to citrus.</p> <p></p> </body> </html>
V 21 CB
Bergamot Orange Seeds (Citrus bergamia)

Variety from America

Sugar beet seeds Authority...

Sugar beet seeds Authority...

Price €1.75 SKU: P 8
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Sugar beet seeds Authority - Heirloom</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Sugar beet - a cold-resistant, light-loving culture, medium-demanding to the fertility of the soil. Sugar beet gives high stable yields, easy to transport. Sugar beet loves heat, light, and moisture.</p> <p>The amount of sugar in the fruit depends on the number of sunny days in August — October. Sugar beet is used not only for making sugar but also for feeding animals.</p> <p>The optimum temperature for seed germination is 10–12 ° C, growth, and development is 20–22 ° C. Shoots are sensitive to frost.</p> <p>Name: Sugar beet Authority<br />Harvest: 75-100 days<br />Root weight: 500-850 g<br />The sugar content: 18-21%<br />Sowing depth: 2-3 cm.</p> <p>tion temperature: 10-15 ° C.</p>
P 8 (20 S)
Sugar beet seeds Authority - Heirloom
100 Seeds Habanero Red 5.45 - 3

100 Seeds Habanero Red

Price €5.45 SKU: C 19 R
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>100 Seeds Habanero Red (Capsicum chinense)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 100 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <div>The habanero is a variety of chili pepper. Unripe habaneros are green, and they color as they mature. The most common color variants are orange and red, but the fruit may also be white, brown, yellow, green, or purple. Typically, a ripe habanero chili is 2–6 cm (0.8–2.4 in) long. Habanero chilis are very hot, rated 100,000–650,000 on the Scoville scale. The habanero's heat, its flavor, and its floral aroma have made it a popular ingredient in hot sauces and spicy foods.<br><br>The name indicates something or someone from La Habana (Havana). In English, it is sometimes spelled and pronounced habañero, the tilde being added as a hyperforeignism patterned after jalapeño.<br><br><strong>Origin and current use</strong><br>The habanero chili comes from the Amazon, from which it was spread, reaching Mexico. A specimen of a domesticated habanero plant, dated at 8,500 years old, was found at an archaeological site in Peru.[citation needed] An intact fruit of a small domesticated habanero, found in pre-ceramic levels in Guitarrero Cave in the Peruvian highlands, was dated to 6500 BC.<br><br>The habanero chili was disseminated by Spanish colonists to other areas of the world, to the point that 18th-century taxonomists mistook China for its place of origin and called it Capsicum chinense ("the Chinese pepper").<br><br>Today, the largest producer is the Yucatán Peninsula, in Mexico. Habaneros are an integral part of Yucatecan food, accompanying most dishes, either in natural form or purée or salsa. Other modern producers include Belize, Panama, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, and parts of the United States, including Texas, Idaho, and California.<br><br>The Scotch bonnet is often compared to the habanero, since they are two varieties of the same species, but they have different pod types. Both the Scotch bonnet and the habanero have thin, waxy flesh. They have a similar heat level and flavor. Both varieties average around the same level of pungency, but the actual degree varies greatly from one fruit to another according to genetics, growing methods, climate, and plant stress.<br><br>In 1999, the habanero was listed by Guinness World Records as the world's hottest chili, but it has since been displaced by other peppers. The Bhut jolokia (or ghost pepper) and Trinidad moruga scorpion have since been identified as native Capsicum chinense subspecies even hotter than the habanero. Breeders constantly crossbreed subspecies to attempt to create cultivars that will break the record on the Scoville scale. One example is the Carolina Reaper, a cross between a Bhut jolokia pepper with a particularly pungent red habanero.<br><br><strong>Cultivation</strong><br>Habaneros thrive in hot weather. Like all peppers, the habanero does well in an area with good morning sun and in soil with a pH level around 5 to 6 (slightly acidic). Habaneros which are watered daily produce more vegetative growth but the same number of fruit, with lower concentrations of capsaicin, as compared to plants which are watered only when dry (every seven days). Overly moist soil and roots will produce bitter-tasting peppers. Daily watering during flowering and early setting of fruit helps prevent flower and immature fruit from dropping, but flower dropping rates are reported to often reach 90% even in ideal conditions.<br><br>The habanero is a perennial flowering plant, meaning that with proper care and growing conditions, it can produce flowers (and thus fruit) for many years. Habanero bushes are good candidates for a container garden. In temperate climates, though, it is treated as an annual, dying each winter and being replaced the next spring. In tropical and subtropical regions, the habanero, like other chiles, will produce year round. As long as conditions are favorable, the plant will set fruit continuously.<br><br><strong>Cultivars</strong><br>Several growers have attempted to selectively breed habanero plants to produce hotter, heavier, and larger peppers. Most habaneros rate between 200,000 and 300,000 on the Scoville scale. In 2004, researchers in Texas created a mild version of the habanero, but retained the traditional aroma and flavor. The milder version was obtained by crossing the Yucatán habanero pepper with a heatless habanero from Bolivia over several generations.</div> <div></div> <div>Black habanero is an alternative name often used to describe the dark brown variety of habanero chilis (although they are slightly different, being slightly smaller and slightly more sphere-shaped). Some seeds have been found which are thought to be over 7,000 years old. The black habanero has an exotic and unusual taste, and is hotter than a regular habanero with a rating between 400,000 and 450,000 Scoville units. Small slivers used in cooking can have a dramatic effect on the overall dish. Black habaneros take considerably longer to grow than other habanero chili varieties. In a dried form, they can be preserved for long periods of time, and can be reconstituted in water then added to sauce mixes. Previously known as habanero negro, or by their Nahuatl name, their name was translated into English by spice traders in the 19th century as "black habanero". The word "chocolate" was derived from the Nahuatl word, xocolātl [ʃoˈkolaːt͡ɬ], and was used in the description, as well (as "chocolate habanero"), but it proved to be unpronounceable to the British traders, so it was simply named "black habanero".<br><br>A 'Caribbean Red,' a cultivar within the habanero family, has a citrusy and slightly smoky flavor, with a Scoville rating ranging from 300,000 to 445,000 Scoville units.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
C 19 R (100 S)
100 Seeds Habanero Red 5.45 - 3

This plant is medicinal plant
Fo-ti, He-shou-wu Seeds (Polygonum multiflorum) 4.95 - 1

Fo-ti, He-shou-wu Seeds...

Price €3.95 SKU: MHS 110
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Fo-ti, He-shou-wu Seeds (Polygonum multiflorum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #fd0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><em>Polygonum multiflorum</em>&nbsp;(Fo-ti) is a popular herb in traditional Chinese medicine. Commonly known as He shou wu in China and Fo-ti in North America, studies have shown this herb to be beneficial in the treatment of cancer, diabetes, hair loss, hardening of the arteries, and neurodegenerative diseases.</p> <p><strong>What is Fo-Ti?</strong></p> <p><em>Polygonum multiflorum</em> Thunb. (<em>P. multiflorum</em>) or <em>Fallopia maltiflora</em> is officially listed in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia and is one of the most popular herbs in Chinese medicines [R].</p> <p>In North America, it is commonly known as Fo-ti.</p> <p>It is widely cultivated throughout China and other countries such as Japan, where it grows in valley shrubs, hillside forests, gutter rock crevices and other locations at altitudes of 200-3000 m [R].</p> <p>The plant grows to be 2-4 m tall consisting of a woody tuber, leaves that are 3-7 cm long and arrowhead-shaped, white or greenish-white flowers that are 6-7 mm in diameter and an achene fruit 2.5-3 mm in length [R].</p> <p>Over the years, parts of Fo-ti&nbsp;have been used for different medicinal purposes.</p> <p>The leaves, root tuber, and rhizomes have been used as a tonic in the anti-aging formula while the stem has been used to alleviate insomnia and to help treat diabetes [R].</p> <p><strong>Chemical Constituents of&nbsp;Fo-ti</strong></p> <p>More than 100 chemical compounds have been isolated from Fo-ti, and the most biologically relevant components have been determined to be from the families of stilbenes, quinones, flavonoids, and phospholipids.</p> <p>Processing Fo-ti, as opposed to using the raw herb, influences the amount and type of chemical constituents found in the plant [R,&nbsp;R].</p> <p>The toxicity of processed Fo-ti&nbsp;is lower than that of the crude herb and this may be associated with the decreased levels of some of the components after processing [R].</p> <p>Additionally, processing of Fo-ti&nbsp;resulted in the formation of five new chemicals that were not identified in the crude herb [R].</p> <p>Refer to the technical section for the full names of these new chemicals and for an extensive list of the chemical constituents of Fo-ti&nbsp;view the article by Lin <em>et al.</em> (2015) [R].</p> <p>Two of the best-studied constituents of Fo-ti include&nbsp;2,3,5,40-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG) and emodin.</p> <p><strong>Pharmacokinetics of Fo-ti</strong></p> <p>Only limited data about certain constituents of Fo-ti is available.</p> <p>Rats rapidly absorb TSG into its bodily fluid and quickly eliminated, distributing through the liver and lung but hardly through the blood-brain and blood-testicle barriers [R].</p> <p>Emodin is found primarily in the liver and brain [R].</p> <p><strong>Health Benefits of Fo-ti</strong></p> <p>Fo-ti&nbsp;exhibits a wide spectrum of pharmacological effects, including anti-aging, immunologic, neuroprotective, anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects.</p> <p>However, few clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the traditional therapeutic claims and to understand the medical potential of its bioactive compounds.</p> <p><strong>Immune-Supporting Effects of&nbsp;Fo-ti</strong></p> <p><strong>1) Anti-inflammatory Effects of&nbsp;Fo-ti</strong></p> <p>TSG and emodin in Fo-ti&nbsp;can decrease inflammation and help with colitis in mouse models by increasing PPAR-gamma and decreasing NF-kB&nbsp;[R, R, R].</p> <p>In mice, A methanol extract of Fo-ti has an&nbsp;anti-inflammatory effect on mouse macrophage cells that are stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (a bacterial toxin from harmful bacteria).</p> <p>This Fo-ti extract inhibited NF-kB activation and thus reduced nitric oxide, COX-2 enzyme, and inflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha and&nbsp;IL-6 [R].</p> <p>Emodin protects microglia cells in the brain from inflammation due to lipopolysaccharides through AMPK/Nrf2 activation [R].</p> <p><strong>2) Fo-ti Promotes Good Immune Function</strong></p> <p>The sugars (rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, and glucose) and anthraquinone glycosides found within Fo-ti&nbsp;can improve immune response and overall immune system function (immunomodulatory effect).</p> <p>Fo-ti boosts the immune system by increasing the production of T and B cells, and improving the activities of the immune cells, as well as increasing the secretion of the inflammatory tumor necrosis factor.</p> <p>Further, Fo-ti increases the&nbsp;activity of natural killer (NK) cells [R, R].</p> <p><strong>3)&nbsp;Fo-ti May be Effective against MRSA</strong></p> <p>Fo-ti has anti-bacterial activity against methicillin-resistant <em>Staphylocuccus aureus</em> (MRSA) in a cell-based study [R].</p> <p><strong>4)&nbsp;Fo-ti has Antiviral activities</strong></p> <p>Fo-ti exhibited anti-HIV by preventing the virus from entering lymphocytes in a cell-based study [R].</p> <p>Emodin blocks binding of SARS coronavirus human cells in a cell-based study [R].</p> <p><strong>5) Fo-ti May Help with Asthma</strong></p> <p>In a mouse model of asthma, Fo-ti decreases airway allergic symptoms [R].</p> <p><strong>Antioxidant Activities of&nbsp;Fo-ti</strong></p> <p><strong>6) Fo-ti&nbsp;Protects the Liver</strong></p> <p>The anthraquinones and polysaccharides found in Fo-ti<em>&nbsp;</em>protect&nbsp;the liver by reducing inflammation, preventing fat oxidation, and increasing antioxidant effects [R, R].</p> <p>Pre-treating rats with 200 mg/kg water extract of Fo-ti protect the rats against chloroform-induced liver toxicity and significantly reduced plasma ALT (a liver enzyme that indicates liver damage) as well as improved glutathione levels and other oxidative stress markers. However, increasing the dose to 400 mg/kg did not protect the liver against chloroform toxicity, and at 4000 mg/kg, Fo-ti damaged the liver [R].</p> <p><strong>7) Fo-ti May Protect the Bone from Oxidative Stress</strong></p> <p>TSG from Fo-ti extract protects the bone-making cells (osteoblasts) from oxidative damage in a cell-based study, suggesting that TSG may protect against osteoporosis due to oxidative stress&nbsp;[R].</p> <p>Hot water extract of Fo-ti prevents bone loss (osteopenia) from mice with that lose bone mass from having their ovaries removed [R].</p> <p><strong>8) Fo-ti Protects Tissues&nbsp;Oxidation in Diabetes</strong></p> <p>2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside&nbsp;protects against kidney damage from high blood sugar in diabetic mice through SIRT1 and TGF-beta1 pathways [R, R].</p> <p>Stilbene glucoside from Fo-ti inhibits tissue aging due to high blood sugar (formation of advanced glycation end product) [R].</p> <p><strong>Neuroprotective effects of&nbsp;Fo-ti</strong></p> <p><strong>9) Fo-ti&nbsp;May&nbsp;Help with Alzheimer’s Disease</strong></p> <p>In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s, tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside from Fo-ti helps with memory deficit [R].</p> <p>A small Chinese clinical trial found that Fo-ti extract is effective against Alzheimer’s disease [R].</p> <p>Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside helps slow down age-related memory loss in rats [R].</p> <p>In a cell-based study, treatment with a Fo-ti root extract reduced amyloid plaque&nbsp;that can cause Alzheimer‘s disease [R].</p> <p>Emodin, a chemical found in Fo-ti, inhibits the enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine, which might be how it helps with cognitive function in a similar manner to Huperzine A and some Alzheimer‘s drugs [R].</p> <p><strong>10) Fo-ti May Help with Parkinson’s Disease</strong></p> <p>In mouse models of Parkinson’s Disease, TSG and an ethanol extract of Fo-ti protects dopaminergic neurons from chemical-induced damage [R,&nbsp;R].</p> <p><strong>11) Fo-ti&nbsp;Protects the Brain from&nbsp;Stroke</strong></p> <p>Hexane extracts of Fo-ti can protect against tissue damage following stroke in mice and thus may have clinical applications as a protective agent against neurological injury [R].</p> <p><strong>12) Fo-ti Protects Against Glutamate-Induced Toxicity</strong></p> <p>In a cell-based study, Fo-ti protects neuronal cells from the hippocampus against glutamate toxicity, suggesting that it can help with cognitive disorders, especially ones that involve memory loss [R].</p> <p><strong>Fo-ti&nbsp;and&nbsp;Cardiovascular Risks</strong></p> <p><strong>13) Fo-ti&nbsp;Helps Reduces Cholesterol</strong></p> <p>Fo-ti&nbsp;can reduce cholesterol and triglycerides in people with high cholesterol&nbsp;[R, R, R].</p> <p>However, further research is required to understand how Fo-ti&nbsp;helps reduce cholesterol.</p> <p><strong>14) Fo-ti&nbsp;Helps Prevent Hardening of the Arteries</strong></p> <p>TSG<em>&nbsp;</em>can prevent hardening of the arteries by reducing lipid levels in the blood, reduce inflammation and normalize the structure of the blood vessel via a reduction in the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 genes [R].</p> <p><strong>15) Fo-ti&nbsp;has Protective Effects in Blood-Clotting Disorders</strong></p> <p>Thromboembolic (blood-clotting) disorders are caused by loose blood clots that form in a blood vessel and are carried by the bloodstream into another vessel that subsequently becomes blocked.</p> <p>This often happens in the lungs (pulmonary embolism), brain (stroke), gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or leg. This phenomenon is known as thromboembolism.</p> <p>The chemical 2,3,5,4′-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside&nbsp;isolated from Fo-ti can prevent abnormal blood clotting [R].</p> <p><strong>16) Fo-ti<em>&nbsp;</em>Protects the Heart</strong></p> <p>In rats, TSG protected the heart from squeezing pressure around the abdomen [R].</p> <p>In a heart attack model, Fo-ti stilbene glycoside can protect against cell injury from lack of oxygen or blood flow by increasing the levels of cellular antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and the nitric oxide pathways [R].</p> <p><strong>17) Fo-ti Helps with Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome</strong></p> <p>Fo-ti, together with red ginseng, helps with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome by improving high blood pressure, obesity, high blood lipids, inflammation of the blood vessels, and insulin sensitivity&nbsp;[R].</p> <p><strong>Other</strong></p> <p><strong>18) Fo-ti&nbsp;Helps Prevent Cancer</strong></p> <p>These anthraquinones induce apoptosis (cell death) in cancer cells and activate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways which are abnormal in many human cancers [R, R].</p> <p>Emodin and aloe-emodin&nbsp;can inhibit cell growth (by inhibiting apoptosis) of human cervical cancer cells, human tongue cancer cells, neuroblastoma cells, and melanoma cells [R].</p> <p>It could significantly reduce colon tumor volume and weight in mice [R].</p> <p>Emodin enhanced tumor cell death of gallbladder cancer cells that are injected into mice [R].</p> <p><strong>19) Fo-ti&nbsp;Helps with Insomnia and Sleep Disorders</strong></p> <p>Fo-ti&nbsp;extracts are commonly prescribed in Taiwan for the treatment of insomnia [R].</p> <p>Additionally, although the evidence is insufficient, <em>P. multiflorum</em> may ease the anxiety and insomnia experienced by patients with bipolar disorder [R].</p> <p><strong>20) Fo-ti&nbsp;Helps With Hair Growth</strong></p> <p>Fo-ti&nbsp;has traditionally been used to treat patients suffering from baldness and hair loss&nbsp;throughout East Asia.</p> <p>This traditional use of the herb has been substantiated by a study conducted in mice showing that <em>P. multiflorum</em> extracts promote hair growth by inducing the anagen phase in resting hair follicles [R].</p> <p>Torachrysone-8-O-β-D-glucoside, a compound found in <em>P. multiflorum</em>, can significantly increase the number of dermal papilla cells which play a role in hair growth and hair fiber length [R].</p> <p><strong>Potential Side Effects and Toxicity</strong></p> <p><strong>Liver Toxicity of Fo-ti</strong></p> <p>The best-known toxicity of <em>P. multiflorum</em> is the induction of hepatotoxicity [R]. Hepatotoxicity induced by <em>P. multiflorum </em>can be severe and even result in death.</p> <p>Several cases of hepatotoxicity due to <em>P. multiflorum</em> have been reported in patients from Australia, China, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands and Slovakia who were taking the product for hair loss, chronic prostatitis or to boost the immune system [R, R, R, R].</p> <p>The main chemicals responsible for the hepatotoxicity of <em>P. multiflorum</em> are free anthraquinones such as emodin and physcion [R]. The toxicity of emodin has been detailed by the U.S. National Toxicology Program [R].</p> <p>The hepatotoxicity of the water extract is higher than that of the ethanol and acetone extracts of <em>P. multiflorum</em>. Processing of <em>P. multiflorum</em> also decreased hepatotoxicity [R, R].</p> <p><strong>Kidney and Lung Toxicity of Fo-ti</strong></p> <ol> <li><em> multiflorum</em> is also toxic to the kidneys (nephrotoxicity) and the lungs (pulmonary toxicity), particularly after long-term use.</li> <li><em> multiflorum</em> causes embryonic toxicity in mice and may affect embryonic development, suggesting that it may not be safe for pregnant women.</li> </ol> <p>Warfarin (prescribed to prevent the formation of blood clots) may interact negatively with <em>P. multiflorum </em>resulting in bone marrow suppression [R].</p> <p><strong>Technical</strong></p> <ul> <li>The underlying mechanisms of <em>P. multiflorum </em>may be related to the antioxidant effects of TSG, a decrease of the angiotensin II level, suppression of transforming growth factor-β1 expression, and inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.</li> <li>Cardiac remodeling refers to the changes in size, shape, structure, and function of the heart and is usually a pathological result of an injury to the heart muscle.</li> <li>Several studies have demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effects of <em>P. multiflorum</em> occur through inhibition of the expression of pro-inflammatory signaling factors such as nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, chemokines, and cytokines (R, R1).</li> <li>Additionally, other markers of diabetes, including the expression of TGF-β1, COX-2, and SIRT1 genes, were found to significantly improve in TSG-treated diabetic rats [R].</li> <li>Full chemical names for the compounds found in <em>P. multiflorum </em>after processing: 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4(H)-pyran-4-one, hydroxymaltol, 5-hydroxym ethyl-furfural, butanedioic acid, and 5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4(H)-pyran-4-one</li> <li>P. multiflorum boosts the immune system by accelerating the production of T and B lymphocytes, initiating the mixed lymphocyte reaction, improving macrophage phagocytosis, and increasing secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Other names for <em>P. multiflorum </em>include:</strong></p> <p>Chinese Cornbind, Chinese Knotweed, Climbing Knotweed, Fallopia multiflora, Flowery Knotweed, Fo Ti Tieng, <strong>Fo-Ti,</strong> He Shou Wu, Ho Shou Wu, Multiflora Preparata, Poligonum, Poligonum Multiflorum, Polygonum,Polygonum Multiflorum Thunberg, Racine de Renouée Multiflore, Radix Polygoni Multiflori, Radix Polygoni Shen Min, Renouée, Renouée à Fleurs Nombreuses, Renouée de Chine, Renouée Multiflore, Reynoutria multiflora (Thunb), Rhizoma Polygonata, Shen Min, Shou Wu, Shou Wu Pian, Tuber Fleeceflower, Zhihe Shou Wu, Zi Shou Wu</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 110 (5 S)
Fo-ti, He-shou-wu Seeds (Polygonum multiflorum) 4.95 - 1