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1.800.000 fresh seeds / 1kg Organic Poppy (Papaver somniferum) 22 - 3

3.800.000 fresh seeds / 1kg...

Price €22.00
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>3.800.000 fresh seeds / 1kg Organic Real Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for package of 1kg 3.800.000 fresh seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>It can be used for sowing and eating 1.800.000 fresh seeds - 1 kg (Papaver somniferum)</p> <p>Papaver somniferum, the Opium poppy, is the species of plant from which opium and poppy seeds are derived. Opium is the source of many narcotics, including morphine (and its derivative heroin), thebaine, codeine, papaverine, and noscapine. The Latin botanical name means the "sleep-bringing poppy", referring to the sedative properties of some of these opiates.</p> <p>The opium poppy is the only species of Papaveraceae that is an agricultural crop grown on a large scale. Other species, Papaver rhoeas and Papaver argemone, are important agricultural weeds, and may be mistaken for the crop.</p> <p>It is also valuable for ornamental purposes, and has been known as the "common garden poppy", referencing all the group of poppy plants.</p> <p>Poppy seeds of Papaver somniferum are an important food item and the source of poppyseed oil, a healthy edible oil that has many uses.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Papaver somniferum is an annual herb growing to 100cm. All parts of the plant are strongly glaucous, giving a greyish-green appearance, and the stem and leaves are sparsely covered with coarse hairs. The leaves are lobed and clasp the stem at the base. The flowers are up to 120mm diameter, normally with four white, mauve or red petals, sometimes with dark markings at the base. The fruit is a hairless, rounded capsule topped with 12–18 radiating stigmatic rays. All parts of the plant exude white latex when wounded.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Use of the opium poppy predates written history. Images of opium poppies have been found in ancient Sumerian artifacts (circa 4000 BC). The making and use of opium was known to the ancient Minoans.[7] Its sap was later named opion by the ancient Greeks, from whence it gained its modern name of opium.</p> <p>Opium was used for treating asthma, stomach illnesses, and bad eyesight.</p> <p>The First and Second Opium Wars among China, the British Empire and France took place in the late 1830s through the early 1860s, when the Chinese attempted to stop western traders smuggling opium into their country.</p> <p>Many modern writers, particularly in the 19th century, have written on the opium poppy and its effects, notably Thomas de Quincey in Confessions of an English Opium Eater</p> <p>The French Romantic composer Hector Berlioz used opium for inspiration, subsequently producing his Symphonie Fantastique. In this work, a young artist overdoses on opium and experiences a series of visions of his unrequited love.</p> <p>Opium poppies (flower and fruit) appear on the coat of arms of the Royal College of Anaesthetists.</p> <p><strong><em>Legality</em></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Opium poppy cultivation in the United Kingdom does not require a license, but extracting opium for medicinal products does.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In Italy, it is forbidden to grow P. somniferum to extract the alkaloids, but small numbers of specimens can be grown without special permits for purely ornamental purposes.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Unlike in its neighbour countries Austria and Switzerland, where opium poppy is still cultivated legally, it has been delegalized in Western Germany after World War II, extending this regulation after German reunification in 1990 also to territories of former GDR, where opium poppy cultivation had remained legal until then.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In the United Arab Emirates, where the drug law is especially stern, at least one man was reported to have been imprisoned for possessing poppy seeds obtained from a bread roll.[9]</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In New Zealand, section 9(4) of the Misuse of Drugs Act states, "It shall be a defence to a charge under subsection (1) [Cultivation of prohibited plants] if the person charged proves that the prohibited plant to which the charge relates was of the species Papaver somniferum, and that it was not intended to be a source of any controlled drug or that it was not being developed as a strain from which a controlled drug could be produced."</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In northern Burma, opium bans have ended a century-old tradition of growing poppy. Between 20,000 and 30,000 ex-poppyfarmers left the Kokang region as a result of the ban in 2002.[11] People from the Wa region, where the ban was implemented in 2005, fled to areas where growing opium is still possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In the United States, opium is listed as a Schedule II controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration. In addition, "Opium poppy and poppy straw" are also prohibited.[12] However, this is not typically enforced for poppies grown or sold for ornamental or food purposes.[4] Though the opium poppy is legal for culinary or æsthetic reasons, poppies were once grown as a cash crop by farmers in California; the law of poppy cultivation in the United States is somewhat ambiguous.</p> <p>The reason for the ambiguity is because The Opium Poppy Control Act of 1942 (now repealed),[14][15][16] stated that any opium poppy should be declared illegal, even if the farmers were issued a state permit. § 3 of The Opium Poppy Control Act stated:</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It shall be unlawful for any person who is not the holder of a license authorizing him to produce the opium poppy, duly issued to him by the Secretary of the Treasury in accordance with the provisions of this Act, to produce the opium poppy, or to permit the production of the opium poppy in or upon any place owned, occupied, used, or controlled by him.</p> <p>This led to the Poppy Rebellion, and to the Narcotics Bureau arresting anyone planting opium poppies and forcing the destruction of poppy fields of anyone who defied the prohibition of poppy cultivation. Though the press of those days favored the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, the state of California supported the farmers who grew opium poppies for their seeds for uses in foods such as poppyseed muffins. Today, this area of law has remained vague and remains somewhat controversial in the United States. The Opium Poppy Control Act of 1942 was repealed on 27 October 1970.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The seeds themselves contain very small amounts of opiates,[4] and have no measurable narcotic effect in small quantities. See poppy tea. However, the television show MythBusters demonstrated that one could test positive for narcotics after consuming four poppy seed bagels. On the show Brainiac: Science Abuse, subjects tested positive after eating only two poppy seed bagels.</p> <p><strong>Medicine</strong></p> <p>Australia (Tasmania), Turkey and India are the major producers of poppy for medicinal purposes and poppy-based drugs, such as morphine or codeine.[23] The USA has a policy of sourcing 80% of its narcotic raw materials from the traditional producers, India and Turkey.[24]</p> <p>A recent initiative to extend opium production for medicinal purposes called Poppy for Medicine was launched by The Senlis Council which proposes that Afghanistan could produce medicinal opium under a scheme similar to that operating in Turkey and India.[25] The Council proposes licensing poppy production in Afghanistan, within an integrated control system supported by the Afghan government and its international allies, to promote economic growth in the country, create vital drugs and combat poverty and the diversion of illegal opium to drug traffickers and terrorist elements. Interestingly, Senlis is on record advocating reintroduction of poppy into areas of Afghanistan, specifically Kunduz, which has been poppy free for some time.</p> <p>The Senlis proposal is based in part on the assertion that there is an acute global shortage of opium poppy-based medicines some of which (morphine) are on the World Health Organisation's list of essential drugs as they are the most effective way of relieving severe pain. This assertion is contradicted by the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), the "independent and quasi-judicial control organ monitoring the implementation of the United Nations drug control conventions". INCB reports that the supply of opiates is greatly in excess of demand.</p> <p>In March 2010, researchers from the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Calgary published an article in Nature Chemical Biology about their discovery of two enzymes and their encoding genes, thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM) and codeine O-demethylase (CODM), involved in morphine biosynthesis derived from the opium poppy.[27] The enzymes were identified as non-heme dioxygenases, and were isolated using functional genomics.[27] Codeine O-demethylase produces the enzyme that converts codeine into morphine.</p> <p><strong>Medical cultivation in the UK</strong></p> <p>In late 2006, the British government permitted the pharmaceutical company Macfarlan Smith (a Johnson Matthey company, FTSE 100) to cultivate opium poppies in England for medicinal reasons[29] after Macfarlan Smith's primary source, India, decided to increase the price of export opium latex. This move is well received by British farmers,[citation needed] with a major opium poppy field based in Didcot, England. As of 2012, they were growing in Dorset, Hampshire, Oxfordshire and Lincolnshire as a spring-sown breakcrop recognised under the single payment scheme farm subsidy.[30] The Office of Fair Trading has alerted the government to their monopoly position on growing in the UK and worldwide production of diamorphine and recommended consideration.[29] The governments response advocated the status quo, being concerned interference might cause the company to stop production.</p> <p><strong>Use as food</strong></p> <p>The opium poppy is the source of two food ingredients: poppy seed and poppyseed oil. The seeds contain very low levels of opiates,[4] and the oil extracted from them contains even less. Both the oil and the seed residue also have commercial uses.</p> <p><strong>Poppy seeds</strong></p> <p>Poppy seeds are commonly used in cuisine from many different cultures. They can be dry roasted and ground to be used in wet curry (curry paste) or dry curry. They have a creamy and nut-like flavor, and when used with ground coconut, the seeds provide a unique and flavour-rich curry base.</p> <p><strong>Ornamental cultivation</strong></p> <p>Once known as the "common garden poppy", live plants and seeds of the opium poppy are widely sold by seed companies and nurseries in most of the western world, including the United States. Poppies are sought after by gardeners for the vivid coloration of the blooms, the hardiness and reliability of the poppy plants, the exotic chocolate-vegetal fragrance note of some cultivars, and the ease of growing the plants from purchased flats of seedlings or by direct sowing of the seed. Poppy seed pods are also sold for dried flower arrangements.</p> <p>Since "opium poppy and poppy straw" are listed in Schedule II of the United States' Controlled Substances Act, a DEA license may be required to grow poppies in ornamental or display gardens. In fact, the legal status of strictly ornamental poppy gardens is more nuanced, and destruction of ornamental poppy installations or prosecution of gardeners (except those caught extracting opium via capsule scarification or tea extraction) are virtually unheard of.[4] During the early spring, opium poppies can be seen flowering in gardens throughout North America and Europe, and beautiful displays are found in many private planters, as well as in public botanical and museum gardens (e.g., United States Botanical Garden, Missouri Botanical Garden, North Carolina Botanical Garden).</p> <p>Many countries grow the plants, and some rely heavily on the commercial production of the drug as a major source of income. As an additional source of profit, the seeds of the same plants are sold for use in foods, so the cultivation of the plant is a significant source of income. This international trade in seeds of P. somniferum was addressed by a UN resolution "to fight the international trade in illicit opium poppy seeds" on 28 July 1998.</p> <p><strong>Popular culture</strong></p> <p>In the 19th century Thomas de Quincey wrote Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821). A book on Opium and allegedly the first book in the series of drug-addiction literature.</p> <p>Recently, a feature film entitled The Opium Eater was released exploring the life of Eric Detzer and how he would go about acquiring opium poppies from flower shops and gardens in the Pacific Northwest (north of Seattle) to feed his addiction. This true story is based on an autobiography, Poppies: Odyssey of an Opium Eater written by Detzer, and starring David Bertelsen. Since the festival release of this film in Breckenridge, CO, eBay has stopped allowing the sale of opium poppy pods on their auction site. This may also be attributed to the death of a Colorado teen, who overdosed on opium tea around the same time.</p> <p>What may be the most well known literary use of the poppy occurs both in L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and in MGM's classic 1939 film based on the novel.</p> <p>In the novel, while on their way to the Emerald City, Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion walk through a field of poppies, and both Dorothy and the Lion mysteriously fall asleep. The Scarecrow and the Tin Man, not being made of flesh and blood, are unaffected. They carry Dorothy to safety and place her on the ground beyond the poppy field. While they are considering how to help the Lion, a field mouse runs in front of them, fleeing a cougar. The Tin Man beheads the cougar with his axe, and the field mouse pledges her eternal gratitude. Being the Queen of the Field Mice, she gathers all her subjects together. The Tin Man cuts down several trees, and builds a wagon. The Lion is pushed onto it, and the mice pull the wagon safely out of the poppy field.</p> <p>In the 1939 film, the sequence is considerably altered. The poppy field is conjured up by the Wicked Witch of the West, and it appears directly in front of the Emerald City, preventing the four travelers from reaching it. As in the novel, Dorothy and the Cowardly Lion fall asleep, but in a direct reversal of the book, the Scarecrow and the Tin Man are unable to carry Dorothy. Glinda, who has been watching over them, conjures up a snowfall which kills the poppies' narcotic power and enables Dorothy and the Lion to awaken. Unfortunately, the Tin Man has been weeping in despair, and the combination of his tears and the wet snow has caused him to rust. After he is oiled by Dorothy, the four skip happily toward the Emerald City.</p> <p>In Baum's other Oz books, Oz's ruler, Princess Ozma, is often shown wearing poppies in her hair as decoration.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 38 B 1kg
1.800.000 fresh seeds / 1kg Organic Poppy (Papaver somniferum) 22 - 3
Arum Seeds, Snakeshead, Adder's Root (Arum maculatum) 2.25 - 1

Arum Seeds, Snakeshead,...

Price €2.25
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Arum Seeds, Snakeshead, Adder's Root (Arum maculatum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Arum maculatum is a common woodland plant species of the family Araceae. It is widespread across most of Europe, as well as Turkey and the Caucasus. It is known by an abundance of common names including snakeshead, adder's root, arum, wild arum, arum lily, lords-and-ladies, devils and angels, cows and bulls, cuckoo-pint, soldiers diddies, priest's pintle, Adam and Eve, bobbins, naked girls, naked boys, starch-root, wake robin, friar's cowl, sonsie-give-us-your-hand, jack in the pulpit and cheese and toast. The name "lords-and-ladies" and other gender-related names refer to the plant's likeness to male and female genitalia symbolising copulation.</p> <p>The purple-spotted leaves of A. maculatum appear in the spring (April–May) followed by the flowers borne on a poker-shaped inflorescence called a spadix, which is partially enclosed in a pale green spathe or leaf-like hood. The flowers are hidden from sight, clustered at the base of the spadix with a ring of female flowers at the bottom and a ring of male flowers above them.</p> <p>Above the male flowers is a ring of hairs forming an insect trap. Insects, especially owl-midges Psychoda phalaenoides,[6] are attracted to the spadix by its faecal odour and a temperature up to 15 °C warmer than the ambient temperature.[7] The insects are trapped beneath the ring of hairs and are dusted with pollen by the male flowers before escaping and carrying the pollen to the spadices of other plants, where they pollinate the female flowers. The spadix may also be yellow, but purple is the more common.</p> <p>In autumn, the lower ring of (female) flowers forms a cluster of bright red berries which remain after the spathe and other leaves have withered away. These attractive red to orange berries are extremely poisonous. The berries contain oxalates of saponins which have needle-shaped crystals which irritate the skin, mouth, tongue, and throat, and result in swelling of throat, difficulty breathing, burning pain, and upset stomach. However, their acrid taste, coupled with the almost immediate tingling sensation in the mouth when consumed, means that large amounts are rarely taken and serious harm is unusual. It is one of the most common causes of accidental plant poisoning based on attendance at hospital emergency departments.</p> <p>The root-tuber may be very big and is used to store starch. In mature specimens, the tuber may be as much as 400 mm below ground level.</p> <p>All parts of the plant can produce allergic reactions in many people and the plant should be handled with care. Many small rodents appear to find the spadix particularly attractive; finding examples of the plant with much of the spadix eaten away is common. The spadix produces heat and probably scent as the flowers mature, and this may attract the rodents.</p> <p>Arum maculatum is also known as cuckoo pint or cuckoo-pint in the British Isles and is named thus in Nicholas Culpepers' famous 17th-century herbal. This is a name it shares with Arum italicum (Italian lords-and-ladies) - the other native British Arum. "Pint" is a shortening of the word "pintle", meaning penis, derived from the shape of the spadix. The euphemistic shortening has been traced to Turner in 1551.[9]</p> <p>As a seedling the plant has small light green leaves that are not glossy like the mature leaves. At about 5 months its leaves grow larger and glossier. At 1 year old all of the leaves become glossy and die back. The next year the plant flowers during summer.</p> <p>It grows in woodland areas and riversides. It can occasionally grow as a weed in partly shaded spots.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p><strong>Culinary</strong></p> <p>The root of the cuckoo-pint, when roasted well, is edible and when ground was once traded under the name of Portland sago. It was used like salep (orchid flour) to make saloop — a drink popular before the introduction of tea or coffee. It was also used as a substitute for arrowroot. If prepared incorrectly, it can be highly toxic, so should be prepared with due diligence and caution.</p> <p><strong>Cultivated</strong></p> <p>Arum maculatum is cultivated as an ornamental plant in traditional and woodland shade gardens. The cluster of bright red berries standing alone without foliage can be a striking landscape accent. The mottled and variegated leaf patterns can add bright interest in darker habitats.</p> <p>Arum maculatum may hybridize with Arum italicum.</p> <p><strong>Laundry starch</strong></p> <p>In 1440, the nuns of Syon Abbey in England used the roots of the cuckoo-pint flower to make starch for altar cloths and other church linens. In fact, communion linen could only be made in this way.</p>
MHS 119 AM
Arum Seeds, Snakeshead, Adder's Root (Arum maculatum) 2.25 - 1
Giant Granadilla Seeds (Passiflora quadrangularis) 2.5 - 10

Giant Granadilla Seeds...

Price €2.50
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Granadilla Seeds, Passion Fruit (Passiflora quadrangularis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Passiflora quadrangularis</b></i><span>, the&nbsp;</span><b>giant granadilla</b><span>,&nbsp;</span><b>barbadine</b><span>&nbsp;(</span>Trinidad<span>),&nbsp;</span><b>grenadine</b><span>&nbsp;(</span>Haiti<span>),&nbsp;</span><b>giant tumbo</b><span>&nbsp;or&nbsp;</span><b>badea</b><span>&nbsp;(</span><small>Spanish pronunciation:&nbsp;</small><span title="Representation in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)" class="IPA">[baˈðe.a]</span><span>), is a species of plant in the family Passifloraceae. It produces the largest fruit of any species within the genus&nbsp;</span><i>Passiflora</i><span>.</span><sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup><span>&nbsp;It is a perennial climber native to the&nbsp;</span>Neotropics<span>.</span></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p>It is a vigorous, tender evergreen perennial climber with nodding red flowers, each surrounded by white and purple filaments. It has smooth, cordate, ovate or<span>&nbsp;</span>acuminate<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves;<span>&nbsp;</span>petioles<span>&nbsp;</span>bearing from 4 to 6 glands; an<span>&nbsp;</span>emetic<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>narcotic<span>&nbsp;</span>root; scented<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers; and a large, oblong<span>&nbsp;</span>fruit, containing numerous seeds, embedded in a<span>&nbsp;</span>subacid<span>&nbsp;</span>edible pulp.<sup id="cite_ref-EB1911_3-0" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>The badea is sometimes grown in<span>&nbsp;</span>greenhouses. The fruits of several other species of Passiflora are eaten.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. laurifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is the<span>&nbsp;</span>water lemon<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. maliformis</i><span>&nbsp;</span>the<span>&nbsp;</span>sweet calabash<span>&nbsp;</span>of the<span>&nbsp;</span>West Indies.<sup id="cite_ref-EB1911_3-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>The fruit<span>&nbsp;</span>juice<span>&nbsp;</span>of the badea is used as a beverage. In some parts of Sri Lanka the fruit, where it is known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>ටං ටිං</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<small></small><span title="Representation in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)" class="IPA">[ tʌŋ tIŋ]</span>), රට පුහුල් or ටුං ටුං,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>is cooked as a vegetable curry, and the seeds are consumed as a snack or used to extract juice.</p> <p>A<span>&nbsp;</span>tea<span>&nbsp;</span>is made from the leaves which is used for<span>&nbsp;</span>high blood pressure<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>diabetes. A drink and ice-cream are made from the fruit.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Ornamental">Ornamental</span></h2> <p><i>Passiflora quadrangularis</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is also grown as an ornamental. Requiring a minimum temperature of 15 °C (59 °F), in temperate zones, it must be grown under glass. It has gained the<span>&nbsp;</span>Royal Horticultural Society’s<span>&nbsp;</span>Award of Garden Merit.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 24-48 hours soak in warm water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">25 ° C +</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 18 PQ
Giant Granadilla Seeds (Passiflora quadrangularis) 2.5 - 10
Giant Roselle Seeds...

Giant Roselle Seeds...

Price €1.75
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2 class=""><b>Giant Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus sabdariffa)</b></h2> <h2 class=""><strong style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 2rem;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></h2> <p><strong>The fruits of this roselle are twice as big as any other roselle.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>The roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a species of Hibiscus native to the Old World tropics, used for the production of bast fiber and as an infusion. It is an annual or perennial herb or woody-based subshrub, growing to 2–2.5 m (7–8 ft) tall. The leaves are deeply three- to five-lobed, 8–15 cm (3–6 in) long, arranged alternately on the stems.</p> </div> <p>The flowers are 8–10 cm (3–4 in) in diameter, white to pale yellow with a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and have a stout fleshy calyx at the base, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) wide, enlarging to 3–3.5 cm (1.2–1.4 in), fleshy and bright red as the fruit matures. It takes about six months to mature.</p> <p><span><strong>Names</strong></span></p> <p><span>The roselle is known as the rosella or rosella fruit in Australia. It is also known as 'Belchanda' among Nepalese, Tengamora among Assamese and "mwitha" among Bodo tribals in Assam, চুকর Chukor in Bengali, Gongura in Telugu, Pundi in Kannada, Ambadi in Marathi, LalChatni or Kutrum in Mithila] Mathipuli in Kerala, chin baung in Burma, กระเจี๊ยบแดง KraJiabDaeng in Thailand, ສົ້ມ ພໍດີ som phor dee in Lao PDR, bissap in Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and Niger, the Congo and France, dah or dah bleni in other parts of Mali, wonjo in the Gambia, zobo in western Nigeria (the Yorubas in Nigeria call the white variety Isapa (pronounced Ishapa)), Zoborodo in Northern Nigeria, Chaye-Torosh in Iran, karkade (كركديه; Arabic pronunciation: [ˈkarkade])[dubious – discuss] in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Sudan, omutete in Namibia, sorrel in the Caribbean and in Latin America, Flor de Jamaica in Mexico, Saril in Panama, grosella in Paraguay and vinagreira, caruru-azedo or quiabo-roxo in Brazil. Rosela in Indonesia, asam belanda[1] in Malaysia. In Chinese it is 洛神花 (Luo Shen Hua) . In Zambia the plant is called lumanda in ciBemba, katolo in kiKaonde, or wusi in chiLunda.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plant is considered to have antihypertensive properties. In some places, the plant is primarily cultivated for the production of bast fibre from the stem of the plant. The fibre may be used as a substitute for jute in making burlap.[2] Hibiscus, specifically Roselle, has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild laxative, and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and cancer.[3]</span></p> <p><span>The red calyces of the plant are increasingly exported to America and Europe, where they are used as food colourings. Germany is the main importer. It can also be found in markets (as flowers or syrup) in some places such as France, where there are Senegalese immigrant communities. The green leaves are used like a spicy version of spinach. They give flavour to the Senegalese fish and rice dish thiéboudieune. Proper records are not kept, but the Senegalese government estimates national production and consumption at 700 t (770 short tons) per year. Also in Burma their green leaves are the main ingredient in making chin baung kyaw curry.</span></p> <p><span>In East Africa, the calyx infusion, called "Sudan tea", is taken to relieve coughs. Roselle juice, with salt, pepper, asafoetida and molasses, is taken as a remedy for biliousness.</span></p> <p><span>The heated leaves are applied to cracks in the feet and on boils and ulcers to speed maturation. A lotion made from leaves is used on sores and wounds. The seeds are said to be diuretic and tonic in action and the brownish-yellow seed oil is claimed to heal sores on camels. In India, a decoction of the seeds is given to relieve dysuria, strangury and mild cases of dyspepsia. Brazilians attribute stomachic, emollient and resolutive properties to the bitter roots.[4]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Leafy vegetable/Greens</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Andhra cuisine, Hibiscus cannabinus, called Gongura, is extensively used. The leaves are steamed along with lentils and cooked with Dal. The other unique dish prepared is gongura pachadi, it is prepared by mixing fried leaves with spices and made into a Gongura Pacchadi, the most famous dish of Andhra cuisine and is often described as king of all foods of Andhra ethnics(andhrulu)</span></p> <p><span>In Burmese cuisine, called chin baung ywet (lit. sour leaf), the roselle is widely used and considered an affordable vegetable for the population. It is perhaps the most widely eaten and popular vegetable in Burma.[5] The leaves are fried with garlic, dried or fresh prawns and green chili or cooked with fish. A light soup made from roselle leaves and dried prawn stock is also a popular dish.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Beverage</strong></span></p> <p><span>Cuisine: Among the Bodo tribals of Bodoland, Assam (India) the leaves of both hibiscus sabdariffa and hibiscus cannabinus are cooked along with chicken, fish or pork, one of their traditional cuisines</span></p> <p><span>In the Caribbean sorrel drink is made from sepals of the roselle. In Malaysia, roselle calyces are harvested fresh to produce pro-health drink due to high contents of vitamin C and anthocyanins. In Mexico, 'agua de Flor de Jamaica' (water flavored with roselle) frequently called "agua de Jamaica" is most often homemade. Also, since many untrained consumers mistake the calyces of the plant to be dried flowers, it is widely, but erroneously, believed that the drink is made from the flowers of the non-existent "Jamaica plant". It is prepared by boiling dried sepals and calyces of the Sorrel/Flower of Jamaica plant in water for 8 to 10 minutes (or until the water turns red), then adding sugar. It is often served chilled. This is also done in Saint Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago where it is called 'sorrel'. The drink is one of several inexpensive beverages (aguas frescas) commonly consumed in Mexico and Central America, and they are typically made from fresh fruits, juices or extracts. A similar thing is done in Jamaica but additional flavor is added by brewing the tea with ginger and adding rum. It is a popular drink of the country at Christmas time. It is also very popular in Trinidad &amp; Tobago but cinnamon, cloves and bay leaves are preferred to ginger. In Mali, Senegal, The Gambia, Burkina Faso and Benin calyces are used to prepare cold, sweet drinks popular in social events, often mixed with mint leaves, dissolved menthol candy, and/or various fruit flavors. The Middle Eastern and Sudanese drink "Karkade"(كركديه) is a cold drink made by soaking the dried Karkade flowers in cold water over night in a refrigerator with sugar and some lemon or lime juice added.It is then consumed with or without ice cubes after the flowers have been strained.In Lebanon, sometimes toasted pine nuts are tossed into the drink.</span></p> <p><span>With the advent in the U.S. of interest in south-of-the-border cuisine, the calyces are sold in bags usually labeled "Flor de Jamaica" and have long been available in health food stores in the U.S. for making a tea that is high in vitamin C. This drink is particularly good for people who have a tendency, temporary or otherwise, toward water retention: it is a mild diuretic.</span></p> <p><span>In addition to being a popular homemade drink, Jarritos, a popular brand of Mexican soft drinks, makes a Flor de Jamaica flavored carbonated beverage. Imported Jarritos can be readily found in the U.S.</span></p> <p><span>In the UK the dried calyces and ready-made sorrel syrup are widely and cheaply available in Caribbean and Asian grocers. The fresh calyces are imported mainly during December and January in order to make Christmas and New Year infusions, which are often made into cocktails with additional rum. They are very perishable, rapidly developing fungal rot, and need to be used soon after purchase – unlike the dried product, which has a long shelf-life.</span></p> <p><span>In Africa, especially the Sahel, roselle is commonly used to make a sugary herbal tea that is commonly sold on the street. The dried flowers can be found in every market. Roselle tea is also quite common in Italy where it spread during the first decades of the 20th century as a typical product of the Italian colonies. The Carib Brewery Trinidad Limited, a Trinidad and Tobago brewery, produces a Shandy Sorrel in which the tea is combined with beer.</span></p> <p><span>In Thailand, Roselle is generally drunk as a cool drink,[6] but also as a tea, believed to also reduce cholesterol. It can also be made into a wine.</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus flowers are commonly found in commercial herbal teas, especially teas advertised as berry-flavoured, as they give a bright red colouring to the drink.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella flowers are sold as Wild Hibiscus flowers in syrup in Australia as a gourmet product. Recipes include filling them with goats cheese, serving them on baguette slices baked with brie, &amp; placing one plus a little syrup, in a champagne flute before adding the champagne when the bubbles cause the flower to open.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Jam and preserves</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Nigeria, rosella jam has been made since Colonial times and is still sold regularly at community fetes and charity stalls. It is similar in flavour to plum jam, although more acidic. It differs from other jams in that the pectin is obtained from boiling the interior buds of the rosella flowers. It is thus possible to make rosella jam with nothing but rosella buds and sugar. Roselle is also used in Nigeria to make a refreshing drink known as Zobo.</span></p> <p><span>In Burma, the buds of the roselle are made into 'preserved fruits' or jams. Depending on the method and the preference, the seeds are either removed or included. The jams, made from roselle buds and sugar, are red and tangy.</span></p> <p><span>"Sorrel jelly" is manufactured in Trinidad.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella Jam is also made in Queensland, Australia as a home-made or speciality product sold at fetes and other community events.[7]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Medicinal uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>Many parts of the plant are also claimed to have various medicinal values. They have been used for such purposes ranging from Mexico through Africa and India to Thailand. Roselle is associated with traditional medicine and is reported to be used as treatment for several diseases such as hypertension and urinary tract infections.[8]</span></p> <p><span>Although Roselle has well documented hypotensive effects,[9] there is currently insufficient evidence to support the benefit of Roselle for either controlling or lowering blood pressure due to a lack of well designed studies that measure the efficacy of Roselle on patients with hypertension.[10]</span></p> <p><span>A double blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial was conducted to determine the effect of Roselle leaf extract on a group of 60 subjects with serum LDL values in the range of 130-190 ml/dl (&lt;130 ml/dl is a goal value for most patients[11]) and no history of coronary heart disease. The experimental group received 1g of Roselle leaf extract while the placebo group received a similar amount of maltodextrin in addition to dietary and physical activity advice. Both groups had decreases in body weight, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides that can likely be attributed to the dietary and physical activity advice. At a dose of 1g/day, Roselle leaf extract did not appear to have a blood lipid lowering effect.[12]</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus sabdariffa has shown in vitro antimicrobial activity against E. coli.[13] A recent review stated that specific extracts of H. sabdariffa exhibit activities against atherosclerosis, liver disease, cancer, diabetes and other metabolic syndromes.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Phytochemicals</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plants are rich in anthocyanins, as well as protocatechuic acid. The dried calyces contain the flavonoids gossypetin, hibiscetine and sabdaretine. The major pigment, formerly reported as hibiscin, has been identified as daphniphylline. Small amounts of myrtillin (delphinidin 3-monoglucoside), Chrysanthenin (cyanidin 3-monoglucoside), and delphinidin are also present. Roselle seeds are a good source of lipid-soluble antioxidants, particularly gamma-tocopherol.[15]</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Production</strong></span></p> <p><span>China and Thailand are the largest producers and control much of the world supply. Thailand invested heavily in roselle production and their product is of superior quality, whereas China's product, with less stringent quality control practices, is less reliable and reputable. The world's best roselle comes from the Sudan, but the quantity is low and poor processing hampers quality. Mexico, Egypt, Senegal, Tanzania, Mali and Jamaica are also important suppliers but production is mostly used domestically.[16]</span></p> <p><span>In the Indian subcontinent (especially in the Ganges Delta region), roselle is cultivated for vegetable fibres. Roselle is called meśta (or meshta, the ś indicating an sh sound) in the region. Most of its fibres are locally consumed. However, the fibre (as well as cuttings or butts) from the roselle plant has great demand in various natural fibre using industries.</span></p> <p><span>Roselle is a relatively new crop to create an industry in Malaysia. It was introduced in early 1990s and its commercial planting was first promoted in 1993 by the Department of Agriculture in Terengganu. The planted acreage was 12.8 ha (30 acres) in 1993, but had steadily increased to peak at 506 ha (1,000 acres) in 2000. The planted area is now less than 150 ha (400 acres) annually, planted with two main varieties.[citation needed] Terengganu state used to be the first and the largest producer, but now the production has spread more to other states. Despite the dwindling hectarage over the past decade or so, roselle is becoming increasingly known to the general population as an important pro-health drink in the country. To a small extent, the calyces are also processed into sweet pickle, jelly and jam. jimmon rubillos</span></p> <p><span><strong>Crop research</strong></span></p> <p><span>In the initial years, limited research work were conducted by University Malaya (UM) and Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI). Research work at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) was initiated in 1999. In many respect, the amount of research work is still considered meagre in supporting a growing roselle industry in Malaysia.</span></p> <p><span>Crop genetic resources &amp; improvement[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase the crop productivity. Being an introduced species in Malaysia, there is a very limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. At present, UKM maintains a working germplasm collection, and also conducts agronomic research and crop improvement.</span></p> <p><span>Mutation breeding[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase its productivity. Being an introduced crop species in Malaysia, there is a limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. Furthermore, conventional hybridization is difficult to carry out in roselle due to its cleistogamous nature of reproduction. Because of this, a mutation breeding programme was initiated to generate new genetic variability.[17] The use of induced mutations for its improvement was initiated in 1999 in cooperation with MINT (now called Malaysian Nuclear Agency), and has produced some promising breeding lines. Roselle is a tetraploid species; thus, segregating populations require longer time to achieve fixation as compared to diploid species. In April 2009, UKM launched three new varieties named UKMR-1, UKMR-2 and UKMR-3, respectively. These three new varieties were developed using variety Arab as the parent variety in a mutation breeding programme which started in 2006.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Natural outcrossing under local conditions</strong></span></p> <p><span>A study was conducted to estimate the amount of outcrossing under local conditions in Malaysia. It was found that outcrossing occurred at a very low rate of about 0.02%. However, this rate is much lower in comparison to estimates of natural cross-pollination of between 0.20% and 0.68% as reported in Jamaica.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Source: Wikipedia</strong></span></p>
MHS 19 G (5 S)
Giant Roselle Seeds (Hibiscus sabdariffa)
Palestinian sweet lime...

Palestinian sweet lime...

Price €2.25
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Palestinian sweet lime seeds (Citrus limettioides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Citrus limettioides, Palestinian sweet lime or Indian sweet lime or common sweet lime, alternatively considered a cultivar of Citrus × limon, C. × limon 'Indian Lime', is a low acid lime that has been used in Palestine for food, juice, and rootstock.</p> <p>Indian sweet lime is a small evergreen tree with few thorns, growing 4 - 6 meters tall.<br />The tree is sometimes cultivated for its edible fruit, especially in India, the Mediterranean region, Vietnam, and tropical America</p> <p>It is a member of the sweet limes. Like the Meyer lemon, it is the result of a cross between the citron (Citrus medica) and a mandarin/pomelo hybrid distinct from sweet and sour oranges.</p> <p><strong>Edible Uses</strong></p> <p>Fruit - raw, cooked, or preserved. A succulent, acidic-sweet pulp. A soft drink is made from the juice.</p> <p><strong>Medicinal</strong></p> <p>The fruit has medicinal properties.<br />Citrus species contain a wide range of active ingredients and research is still underway in finding uses for them. They are rich in vitamin C, flavonoids, acids, and volatile oils. They also contain coumarins such as bergapten which sensitizes the skin to sunlight. Bergapten is sometimes added to tanning preparations since it promotes pigmentation in the skin, though it can cause dermatitis or allergic responses in some people. Some of the plants more recent applications are as sources of anti-oxidants and chemical exfoliants in specialized cosmetics.<br />Other Uses<br />Essential oil is obtained from the peel of the fruit.</p> <p>The plant is used as a rootstock for other Citrus species.</p> </body> </html>
V 119 CL
Palestinian sweet lime seeds (Citrus limettioides)

Bottle Palm Seeds (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis) 4.95 - 3

Bottle Palm Seeds...

Price €4.95
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Bottle Palm Seeds (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Hyophorbe lagenicaulis, the bottle palm or palmiste gargoulette, is a species of flowering plant in the Arecaceae family. It is native to Round Island, Mauritius.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The Bottle Palm's stem swells from near its base</p> <p>Bottle palm has a large swollen (sometimes bizarrely so) trunk. It is a myth that the trunk is a means by which the palm stores water. Bottle palms have only four to six leaves open at any time. The leaves of young palms have a red or orange tint, but a deep green is assumed at maturity. The flowers of the palm arise from under the crownshaft.</p> <p>This species is often confused with its relative, the Spindle Palm, which also has a swollen trunk. However the Spindle palm's trunk swells in the middle (resembling the shape of a spindle), whereas the trunk of the Bottle palm swells from near the base and tapers further up. Its inflorescence branches in 4 orders, and its 2.5 cm fruits can be orange or black. The trunk of both species becomes more and more slender as the palm ages.</p> <p>Within Mauritius, the only other extant Hyophorbe species is the common Hyophorbe vaughanii. The Bottle palm can be distinguished from this species however, by its swollen trunk when young; by its much smaller (2.5 cm) orange or black fruits; and by its inflorescence, which branches in four orders rather than three.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and habitat</strong></p> <p>The bottle palm is naturally endemic to Round Island, off the coast of Mauritius. While habitat destruction may destroy the last remaining palms in the wild, the survival of the species is assured due to its ubiquitous planting throughout the tropics and subtropics as a specimen plant. It is one of three Hyophorbe species which naturally occur in Mauritius, and one of only two that are still extant.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Bottle palms are very cold sensitive and are killed at 0 °C (32 °F) or colder for any appreciable length of time. They may survive a brief, light frost, but will have foliage damage. Only southern Florida and Hawaii provide safe locations in the USA to grow Bottle Palm, although mature flowering specimens may be occasionally be seen in favored microclimates around Cape Canaveral and Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater in coastal central Florida. It makes a fine container-grown palm in other locations as long as it is protected from the cold and not overwatered.</p>
PS 13
Bottle Palm Seeds (Hyophorbe lagenicaulis) 4.95 - 3

Variety from Peru

Variety from Peru
Red Maca Seeds (Lepidium meyenii)  - 3

Red Maca Seeds (Lepidium...

Price €2.20
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Red Maca Seeds (Lepidium meyenii)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is a hearty root vegetable grown in the high Andes of Bolivia and Peru. Cultivated since pre-Incan times, it is prized by indigenous peoples for its nutritional and medicinal properties along with its power as an aphrodisiac, energy enhancer, and hormonal balancer.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Profile:</strong></p> <p>A dietary staple for the indigenous peoples of the Andes, Maca (L. meyenii) is rich in nutrients, containing 31 different minerals, amino acids, antioxidants, alkaloids, and sterols. Maca is an "adaptogen", a substance that brings the body to a heightened state of resistance to disease. Studies suggest that it has a balancing effect on the hypothalamus, which in turn balances other endocrine glands in the body.</p> <p><strong>Clinical Research:</strong></p> <p>Maca (L. meyenii) root has flourished for thousands of years in the high Andes at altitudes up to 14,000 feet, in extreme climatic conditions where few other plants can survive a single season. Scientists suggest that Maca's remarkable endurance may help to explain its energizing and adaptogenic properties. Peruvian and Chinese researchers have conducted clinical tests on both humans and animals, verifying Maca's capacity to strengthen the libido and increase sperm count.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
P 35 C
Red Maca Seeds (Lepidium meyenii)  - 3
Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant,...

Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant,...

Price €4.95
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Camellia sinensis</b></i><span> </span>is a<span> </span>species<span> </span>of evergreen<span> </span>shrubs<span> </span>or small<span> </span>trees<span> </span>in the<span> </span>flowering plant<span> </span>family<span> </span>Theaceae<span> </span>whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce<span> </span>tea. Common names include "<b>tea plant</b>", "tea shrub", and "tea tree" (not to be confused with<span> </span><i>Melaleuca alternifolia</i>, the source of<span> </span>tea tree oil, or<span> </span><i>Leptospermum scoparium</i>, the New Zealand tea tree).</p> <p><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>sinensis</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>C. s.</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>assamica</i><span> </span>are two major varieties grown today.<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><span> </span>White tea,<span> </span>yellow tea,<span> </span>green tea,<span> </span>oolong,<span> </span>dark tea<span> </span>(which includes<span> </span>pu-erh tea) and<span> </span>black tea<span> </span>are all harvested from one or the other, but are<span> </span>processed<span> </span>differently to attain varying levels of<span> </span>oxidation.<span> </span>Kukicha<span> </span>(twig<span> </span>tea) is also harvested from<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i>, but uses twigs and stems rather than leaves.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nomenclature_and_taxonomy">Nomenclature and taxonomy</span></h2> <p>The<span> </span>generic<span> </span>name<span> </span><i>Camellia</i><span> </span>is taken from the<span> </span>Latinized name<span> </span>of Rev.<span> </span>Georg Kamel,<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>SJ<span> </span>(1661–1706), a<span> </span>Moravian-born<span> </span>Jesuit<span> </span>lay brother, pharmacist, and missionary to the<span> </span>Philippines.</p> <p>Carl Linnaeus<span> </span>chose his name in 1753 for the genus to honor Kamel's contributions to botany<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>(although Kamel did not discover or name this plant, or any<span> </span><i>Camellia</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>and Linnaeus did not consider this plant a<span> </span><i>Camellia</i><span> </span>but a<span> </span><i>Thea</i>).<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>Robert Sweet<span> </span>shifted all formerly<span> </span><i>Thea</i><span> </span>species to the genus<span> </span><i>Camellia</i><span> </span>in 1818.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>The name<span> </span><i>sinensis</i><span> </span>means "from China" in<span> </span>Latin.</p> <p>Four varieties of<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>are recognized.<sup id="cite_ref-FOC_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Of these,<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>sinensis</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>C. s.</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>assamica</i><span> </span>(JW Masters) Kitamura are most commonly used for tea, and<span> </span><i>C. s.</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>pubilimba</i><span> </span>Hung T. Chang and<span> </span><i>C. s.</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>dehungensis</i><span> </span>(Hung T. Chang &amp; BH Chen) TL Ming are sometimes used locally.<sup id="cite_ref-FOC_1-2" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>The Cambod type tea (<i>C. assamica</i><span> </span>subsp.<span> </span><i>lasiocaly</i>) was originally considered a type of assam tea. However, later genetic work showed that it is a hybrid between Chinese small leaf tea and assam type tea.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Tea plants are native to East Asia, and probably originated in the borderlands of north Burma and southwestern China.<sup id="cite_ref-Yamamoto_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup></p> <ul> <li>Chinese (small leaf) tea [<i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>sinensis</i>]</li> <li>Chinese Western Yunnan Assam (large leaf) tea [<i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>assamica</i>] <ul> <li>Indian Assam (large leaf) tea [<i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>assamica</i>]</li> </ul> </li> <li>Chinese Southern Yunnan Assam (large leaf) tea [<i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>assamica</i>]</li> </ul> <p>Chinese (small leaf) type tea may have originated in southern China possibly with hybridization of unknown wild tea relatives. However, since no wild populations of this tea are known, the precise location of its origin is speculative.<sup id="cite_ref-Meegahakumbura_1_10-0" class="reference">[10]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Meegahakumbura_2_11-0" class="reference">[11]</sup></p> <p>Given their genetic differences forming distinct<span> </span>clades, Chinese Assam type tea (<i>C. s.</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>assamica</i>) may have two different parentages – one being found in southern<span> </span>Yunnan<span> </span>(Xishuangbanna,<span> </span>Pu'er City) and the other in western Yunnan (Lincang,<span> </span>Baoshan). Many types of Southern Yunnan Assam tea have been hybridized with the closely related species<span> </span><i>Camellia taliensis.</i><span> </span>Unlike Southern Yunnan Assam tea, Western Yunnan Assam tea shares many genetic similarities with Indian Assam type tea (also<span> </span><i>C. s.</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>assamica</i>). Thus, Western Yunnan Assam tea and Indian Assam tea both may have originated from the same parent plant in the area where southwestern China, Indo-Burma, and Tibet meet. However, as the Indian Assam tea shares no<span> </span>haplotypes<span> </span>with Western Yunnan Assam tea, Indian Assam tea is likely to have originated from an independent domestication. Some Indian Assam tea appears to have hybridized with the species<span> </span><i>Camellia pubicosta.</i><sup id="cite_ref-Meegahakumbura_1_10-1" class="reference">[10]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Meegahakumbura_2_11-1" class="reference">[11]</sup></p> <p>Assuming a generation of 12 years, Chinese small leaf tea is estimated to have diverged from Assam tea around 22,000 years ago, while Chinese Assam tea and Indian Assam tea diverged 2,800 years ago. This divergence tea would correspond to the last<span> </span>glacial maximum.<sup id="cite_ref-Meegahakumbura_1_10-2" class="reference">[10]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Meegahakumbura_2_11-2" class="reference">[11]</sup></p> <p>Chinese small leaf type tea was introduced into India in 1836 by the British and some Indian Assam type tea (e.g.<span> </span>Darjeeling tea) appear to be genetic hybrids of Chinese small leaf type tea, native Indian Assam, and possibly also closely related wild tea species.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivars">Cultivars</span></h2> <p>Hundreds,<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup><span> </span>if not thousands of<span> </span>cultivars<span> </span>of<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>are known. Some Japanese cultivars include:</p> <ul> <li>Benifuuki<sup id="cite_ref-ijtc_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup></li> <li>Fushun<sup id="cite_ref-vdat_15-0" class="reference">[15]</sup></li> <li>Kanayamidori<sup id="cite_ref-ijtc_14-1" class="reference">[14]</sup></li> <li>Meiryoku<sup id="cite_ref-vdat_15-1" class="reference">[15]</sup></li> <li>Saemidori<sup id="cite_ref-vdat_15-2" class="reference">[15]</sup></li> <li>Okumidori<sup id="cite_ref-vdat_15-3" class="reference">[15]</sup></li> <li>Yabukita<sup id="cite_ref-vdat_15-4" class="reference">[15]</sup></li> </ul> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>is native to<span> </span>East Asia, the<span> </span>Indian Subcontinent, and<span> </span>Southeast Asia, but it is today cultivated across the world in tropical and subtropical regions. It is an evergreen<span> </span>shrub<span> </span>or small<span> </span>tree<span> </span>that is usually trimmed to below 2 m (6.6 ft) when cultivated for its leaves. It has a strong<span> </span>taproot. The flowers are yellow-white, 2.5–4 cm (0.98–1.57 in) in diameter, with seven or eight petals.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/36/Flower_of_Tea_plant.jpg/220px-Flower_of_Tea_plant.jpg" width="220" height="147" class="thumbimage" title="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flower of tea plant</div> </div> </div> <p>The seeds of<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>C. oleifera</i><span> </span>can be pressed to yield<span> </span>tea oil, a sweetish seasoning and cooking oil that should not be confused with<span> </span>tea tree oil, an<span> </span>essential oil<span> </span>that is used for medical and cosmetic purposes, and originates from the leaves of a different plant.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e3/Camellia_sinensis_-_K%C3%B6hler%E2%80%93s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-025.jpg/220px-Camellia_sinensis_-_K%C3%B6hler%E2%80%93s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-025.jpg" width="220" height="267" class="thumbimage" title="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>plant, with cross-section of the flower (lower left) and seeds (lower right)</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e3/Camellia_sinensis_MHNT.BOT.2016.12.24.jpg/220px-Camellia_sinensis_MHNT.BOT.2016.12.24.jpg" width="220" height="166" class="thumbimage" title="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>-<span> </span>MHNT</div> </div> </div> <p>The leaves are 4–15 cm (1.6–5.9 in) long and 2–5 cm (0.79–1.97 in) broad. Fresh leaves contain about 4%<span> </span>caffeine, as well as related compounds including<span> </span>theobromine.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><span> </span>The young, light-green leaves are preferably harvested for tea production; they have short, white hairs on the underside. Older leaves are deeper green. Different leaf ages produce differing tea qualities, since their chemical compositions are different. Usually, the tip (bud) and the first two to three leaves are harvested for processing. This hand picking is repeated every one to two weeks.</p> <p>In 2017, Chinese scientists sequenced the genome of<span> </span><i>C. s. var. assamica .</i><span> </span>It contains about three billion base pairs, which was larger than most plants previously sequenced.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>is mainly cultivated in tropical and subtropical climates, in areas with at least 127 cm (50 in) of rainfall a year. Tea plants prefer a rich and moist growing location in full to part sun and can be grown in<span> </span>hardiness zones<span> </span>7 – 9. However, the clonal one is commercially cultivated from the equator to as far north as<span> </span>Cornwall<span> </span>and<span> </span>Scotland<span> </span>on the UK mainland.<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup><span> </span>Many high-quality teas are grown at high elevations, up to 1,500 m (4,900 ft), as the plants grow more slowly and acquire more flavor.</p> <p>Tea plants will grow into a tree if left undisturbed, but cultivated plants are pruned to waist height for ease of plucking. Two principal varieties are used, the small-leaved Chinese variety plant (<i>C. s. sinensis</i>) and the large-leaved Assamese plant (<i>C. s. assamica</i>), used mainly for black tea.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Chinese_teas">Chinese teas</span></h3> <p>The Chinese plant is a small-leafed bush with multiple stems that reaches a height of some 3 m. It is native to southeast China. The first tea plant variety to be discovered, recorded, and used to produce tea dates back 3,000 years ago, it yields some of the most popular teas.</p> <p><i>C. s.</i><span> </span>var.<span> </span><i>waldenae</i><span> </span>was considered a different species,<span> </span><i>C. waldenae</i><span> </span>by SY Hu,<sup id="cite_ref-ICS_21-0" class="reference">[21]</sup><span> </span>but it was later identified as a variety of<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-22" class="reference">[22]</sup><span> </span>This variety is commonly called Waldenae Camellia. It is seen on<span> </span>Sunset Peak<span> </span>and<span> </span>Tai Mo Shan<span> </span>in<span> </span>Hong Kong. It is also distributed in<span> </span>Guangxi<span> </span>province, China.<sup id="cite_ref-ICS_21-1" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Indian_and_Nepali_teas">Indian and Nepali teas</span></h3> <p>Three main kinds of tea are produced in India:</p> <ul> <li>Assam<span> </span>comes from the heavily forested northeastern section of the country,<span> </span>Assam. Tea from here is rich and full-bodied. In Assam, the first tea estate of India was established, in 1837.</li> <li>Darjeeling<span> </span>is from the cool and wet<span> </span>Darjeeling<span> </span>region, tucked in the foothills of the<span> </span>Himalayas. Tea plantations reach 2,200 meters. The tea is delicately flavored and considered to be one of the finest teas in the world. The Darjeeling plantations have three distinct harvests, termed 'flushes', and the tea produced from each flush has a unique flavor. First (spring) flush teas are light and aromatic, while the second (summer) flush produces tea with a bit more bite. The third, or autumn flush gives a tea that is lesser in quality.</li> </ul> <p>Nepali tea is also considered to be similar to the tea produced in Darjeeling, mostly because the eastern part of Nepal, where a large amount of tea is produced, has similar topography to that of Darjeeling.</p> <ul> <li>Nilgiri<span> </span>is from a southern region of India almost as high as Darjeeling. Grown at elevations between 1,000 and 2,500 m, Nilgiri teas are subtle and rather gentle and are frequently blended with other, more robust teas.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (December 2014)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></li> </ul> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Camellia_sinensis-fruto.jpg/200px-Camellia_sinensis-fruto.jpg" width="200" height="150" class="thumbimage" title="Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Seed-bearing fruit of<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i></div> </div> </div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Pests_and_diseases">Pests and diseases</span></h3> <div class="hatnote navigation-not-searchable">Main article:<span> </span>List of tea diseases</div> <div class="hatnote navigation-not-searchable">See also:<span> </span>List of Lepidoptera that feed on Camellia</div> <p>Tea leaves are eaten by some<span> </span>herbivores, such as the<span> </span>caterpillars<span> </span>of the<span> </span>willow beauty<span> </span>(<i>Peribatodes rhomboidaria</i>), a<span> </span>geometer moth.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Health_effects">Health effects</span></h2> <p>Although health benefits have been assumed throughout the history of using tea as a common beverage, no high-quality evidence shows that tea confers significant benefits.<sup id="cite_ref-medline_23-0" class="reference">[23]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-nccih_24-0" class="reference">[24]</sup><span> </span>In<span> </span>clinical research<span> </span>over the early 21st century, tea has been studied extensively for its potential to lower the risk of<span> </span>human diseases, but none of this research is conclusive as of 2017.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Biosynthesis_of_caffeine">Biosynthesis of caffeine</span></h2> <p>Caffeine, a molecule produced in<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i>, functions as a<span> </span>secondary metabolite. Caffeine is a purine alkaloid and its biosynthesis occurs in young tea leaves and is regulated by several enzymes.<sup id="cite_ref-25" class="reference">[25]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-26" class="reference">[26]</sup><span> </span>The biosynthetic pathway in<span> </span><i>C. sinensis</i><span> </span>differs from other caffeine-producing plants such as<span> </span>coffee<span> </span>or<span> </span>guayusa. Analysis of the pathway was carried out by harvesting young leaves and using reverse transcription<span> </span>PCR<span> </span>to analyze the genes encoding the major enzymes involved in synthesizing caffeine. The gene<span> </span><i>TCS1</i><span> </span>encodes caffeine synthase. Younger leaves feature high concentrations of TCS1 transcripts, allowing more caffeine to be synthesized during this time. Dephosphorylation of xanthosine-5'-monophosphate into<span> </span>xanthosine<span> </span>is the committed step for the xanthosines entering the beginning of the most common pathway. A sequence of reactions turns xanthosine into 7-methylxanthosine, then 7-methylxanthine, then theobromine, and finally into caffeine.</p> <h2 class="title style-scope ytd-video-primary-info-renderer"><yt-formatted-string force-default-style="" class="style-scope ytd-video-primary-info-renderer">Tea Germination from Seed</yt-formatted-string></h2> <p><iframe width="640" height="385" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Dh9dhkOBynw?rel=0&amp;hd=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" class="embed-responsive-item"> </iframe></p> </body> </html>
MHS 1 CS
Tea Tree Seeds, tea plant, tea shrub (Camellia sinensis)

Variety from Peru

Variety from Peru
Black Maca Organic Seeds (Lepidium meyenii) Aphrodisiac 2.049999 - 1

Black Maca Organic Seeds...

Price €2.05
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Black Maca Organic Seeds (Lepidium meyenii) Aphrodisiac</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <div>Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is a hearty root vegetable grown in the high Andes of Bolivia and Peru. Cultivated since pre-Incan times, it is prized by indigenous peoples for its nutritional and medicinal properties along with its power as an aphrodisiac, energy enhancer and hormonal balancer.</div> <div>Nutritional Profile:</div> <div>A dietary staple for the indigenous peoples of the Andes, Maca (L. meyenii) is rich in nutrients, containing 31 different minerals, amino acids, antioxidants, alkaloids and sterols. Maca is an "adaptogen", a substance which brings the body to a heightened state of resistance to disease. Studies suggest that it has a balancing effect on the hypothalamus, which in turn balances other endocrine glands in the body.</div> <div> </div> <div>Clinical Research:</div> <div>Maca (L. meyenii) root has flourished for thousands of years in the high Andes at altitudes up to 14,000 feet, in extreme climatic conditions where few other plants can survive a single season. Scientists suggest that Maca's remarkable endurance may help to explain its energizing and adaptogenic properties. Peruvian and Chinese researchers have conducted clinical tests on both humans and animals, verifying Maca's capacity to strengthen the libido and increase sperm count. <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </div> </body> </html>
P 35 B
Black Maca Organic Seeds (Lepidium meyenii) Aphrodisiac 2.049999 - 1
Miracle Fruit, Miracle Berry Seeds (Synsepalum dulcificum) 4.95 - 1

Miracle Fruit, Miracle...

Price €4.95
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Miracle Fruit - &nbsp;Miracle Berry Seeds (Synsepalum dulcificum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Synsepalum dulcificum, also known as the miracle fruit, is a plant with a berry that, when eaten, causes sour foods (such as lemons&nbsp; and limes) subsequently consumed to taste sweet. Miracle Fruit&nbsp; is a berry born on a small shrub native to Ghana, Africa. The fruit contains a unique glycolprotein called miraculin that inhibits the tongue's perception of sour flavors.When the fleshy part of the fruit is eaten, this molecule binds to the tongue's taste buds, causing sour foods to taste sweet. The effects are experienced by moving the pleasant tasting fruit over the tongue and then discarding the seed. For up to an hour all bitter and sour flavors will be masked and everything consumed will taste sweet. The fruit are commonly used as a novelty, but they are also valuable for medicinal and dietary purposes as well. Miracle Fruit can mask the metallic flavor food gets after a chemo treatment, thereby acting somewhat like an appetite stimulant. By eliminating that intense metallic flavor the overwhelming sense of nausea and aversion to food vanishes. Chemo patients are able to enjoy a simple meal after using a Miracle Fruit, and this can help improve quality of life, reverse unwanted weight loss, and help speed recovery.</p> <h3><strong>Culture Location:</strong></h3> <p>Young plants need a constant tropical environment (warmth and high humidity), but mature plants will tolerate periods of household temperatures as long as they are not subject to direct heat. In the summer the plant should be moved outdoors to a warm, humid, lightly shaded spot.</p> <h3><strong>Fruit:</strong></h3> <p>The fruit is a small red, ellipsoid berry approximately 1/2 inch long and contains a single seed. The fruit are produced in flushes many months of the year. Although not sweet itself, when a fruit is eaten and the pulp allowed to coat the taste buds, an miraculous effect occurs. A slice of lemon or lime will taste deliciously sweet. The marvelous aroma and sweetness of the citrus remains but the sourness is almost completely covered. Strawberries taste like they are dipped in sugar. The effect remains for 1 hour or more.</p> <h3><strong>MIRACLE FRUIT</strong></h3> <p>grows between 6 to 15 feet in height and has dense foliage. The plant grows best in soils with a pH as low as 4.5 to 5.8, in an environment free from frost and in partial shade with high humidity. It is tolerable to drought, full sunshine and slopes. The seeds need at least 14 to 21 days to germinate.</p>
V 204
Miracle Fruit, Miracle Berry Seeds (Synsepalum dulcificum) 4.95 - 1
Parsley Giant of Naples Seeds (Petroselinum crispum)

Parsley Giant of Naples...

Price €1.50
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Parsley Giant of Naples Seeds (Petroselinum crispum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #e03e2d;"><strong>Price for Package of 600 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Parsley Giant of Naples. Very large flat-leaf variety from Naples with incredible flavor. Plants are large with strong, long stalks and large leaves.</p> <p>Start from seed or transplants. Leaves grow back stronger after cutting. 75-80 days. Very cold hardy. Will overwinter in most areas.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><strong>PARSLEY PLANTING, GROWING, AND HARVESTING PARSLEY</strong></h2> <p>Parsley is a biennial plant with bright green, featherlike leaves and is in the same family as dill. This herb is used in soups, sauces, and salads, and it lessens the need for salt in soups. Not only is it the perfect garnish, but also it is healthy; it’s rich in iron and vitamins A and C.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PLANTING</strong></p> <p>For a head start, plant seeds in individual pots indoors 10 to 12 weeks before the last spring frost. For better germination, you can soak the seeds overnight.</p> <p>Plant the seeds 3 to 4 weeks before the last spring frost because parsley is a slow starter. (The plants can handle the cold weather.) It can take up to 3 weeks for the plants to sprout.</p> <p>Plant the seeds in moist, rich soil about 6 to 8 inches apart. For thinner plants, plant about 6 to 10 inches apart. Try to pick an area that is weed-free; that way, you’ll be able to see the parsley sprouting after about 3 weeks.</p> <p>You can use a fluorescent light to help the seedlings grow. Make sure it remains two inches above the leaves at all times.</p> <p>To ensure the best growth, the soil should be around 70ºF.</p> <p>Plant parsley near asparagus, corn, and tomatoes in your garden.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CARE</strong></p> <p>Be sure to water the seeds often while they germinate so that they don’t dry out.</p> <p>Throughout the summer, be sure to water the plants evenly.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>PESTS/DISEASES</strong></p> <p>Stem rot</p> <p>Leaf spots</p> <p>Black swallowtail larvae</p> <p>Carrot fly and celery fly larvae</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>HARVEST/STORAGE</strong></p> <p>When the leaf stems have three segments, parsley is ready to be harvested.</p> <p>Cut leaves from the outer portions of the plant whenever you need them. Leave the inner portions of the plant to mature.</p> <p>One method of storing the parsley fresh is to put the leaf stalks in water and keep them in the refrigerator.</p> <p>Another method of storage is drying the parsley. Cut the parsley at the base and hang it in a well-ventilated, shady, and warm place. Once it’s completely dry, crumble it up and store it in an airtight container.</p> <p>If you want fresh parsley throughout the winter, replant a parsley plant in a pot and keep it in a sunny window.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 181 (1g)
Parsley Giant of Naples Seeds (Petroselinum crispum)
Okra Burgundy Seeds  - 5

Okra Burgundy Seeds...

Price €1.85
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Okra Burgundy Seeds Clemson Spineless</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 15 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>This variety is one of the most popular, prolific and reliable strains available.  Straight, 6-7 inch, red pods are slightly ridged and definitely spineless.   Plants 3 ft. high, produce an abundance of dark green, 6-inch slightly tapered and ribbed, straight, pointed pods without spines.   Best when 2 1/2-3 in. long. Fine quality and prolific.  First harvest  around 60 days after seed is sown. </div> <div>Days to Germination: 10-14</div> <div>Days To Harvest:  55-65</div> <div>Planting Depth: 1/2 - 3/4 in.</div> <div>Spacing, Row: 3 foot</div> <div>Plant Height: 3 ft.</div> <div>Light:  Full Sun</div> <h3><strong>Sowing instructions:</strong></h3> <div>Sow under cover 4-6 weeks before last frost or directly outside in warmer areas from late spring.</div> <div>Sow 1/2-3/4 inch deep, 2 to a pot and thin to strongest seedling, or thinly in rows, thinning to 18-24 inches between plants.</div> <div>Plant out after last frost.</div> <div>Sunny location required in order to maximise harvest.</div> <div>Harvest pods when they are young and tender, 2 1/2 - 3 inches long. </div> <div>Keep ripe pods picked to encourage production.</div> <div>showing.</div> <div>Harvest the beans when the pods are well fat and the seed still soft.</div> </body> </html>
P 52 C
Okra Burgundy Seeds  - 5