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Beetroot family

There are 22 products.

Showing 1-12 of 22 item(s)
Beetroot 1000 Seeds - Egyptian

1400 Seeds Egyptian Beetroot

Price €8.00
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><em><strong>Beetroot Seeds - Egyptian (Beta vulgaris)</strong></em></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size:14pt;">Price for Package of 1400 seeds (20g).</span></strong></span></h2> <div>Heirloom variety dating back to 1800’s that produces a flattish beetroot with dark red flesh that has lighter zones. Excellent old fashioned flavour, eaten raw or cooked. Delicious edible tops</div> <div>stay green and can be used as spinach or in salads. Early variety. 55 days.</div>
P 111 (20g)
Beetroot 1000 Seeds - Egyptian
  • New
Beetroot Rainbow Beet Seeds

Rainbow Beetroot Seeds

Price €2.00
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Rainbow Beetroot Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 55+- (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A visually stunning mixture of five beetroot varieties with superb contrasting outer skins, flesh, stems and leaves! Each variety has a deliciously sweet flavour and they can be enjoyed as mature roots or as tasty 'baby beets'. Delicious whether they are eaten hot or cold, cooked or pickled, Beetroot 'Rainbow Beet' can even be sliced raw into salads for a colourful crunch. Try steaming the tender stems and leaves as an alternative to spinach or Swiss chard. Height: 30cm (12in). Spread: 15cm (6in).</p> <p>    Collection comprises:</p> <p>    Beetroot 'Subeto' - Deep, rich, purple-red roots with purple stems and green leaves.</p> <p>    Beetroot 'Boldor' - A vibrant globe variety with a yellow flesh and orange outer skin. The yellow stems contrast nicely with the bright green leaves.</p> <p>    Beetroot 'Chioggia' - A striking globe variety with red-pink skin and an appealing 'bullseye' formation of red and white rings on the inside fading to soft pink when cooked. Pink stems.</p> <p>    Beetroot 'Albina Vereduna' - Pure white roots with superb flavour, and pale green stems.</p> <p>    Beetroot 'Bull's Blood Scarletta' - A striking variety with dark burgundy-purple leaves, stems and outer skins. When cut open, roots are cerise pink with attractive concentric rings.</p> <h3><strong>How To Sow</strong></h3> <p>Direct sow beetroot seeds outdoors from March to July in a weed-free, sunny position in fertile, light, well-drained soil. Sow beetroot seeds thinly in shallow drills at a depth of 3cm (1") and 30cm (12") apart. Germination will usually take 12 to 24 days. When large enough to handle, thin out the seedlings within each row to 10cm (4") apart.</p> <h3><strong>Aftercare</strong></h3> <p>When growing beetroot, water as necessary to prevent the soil from drying out and keep the plants cool and moist. This will help to avoid plants running to seed. Roots can be lifted at any time from June to October once they have reached 3cm (1") diameter or more. Harvest any remaining crops before the first frosts. Beetroot can be stored until mid-spring in boxes of moist sand in a frost free shed or garage.</p> </body> </html>
VE 223 (1g)
Beetroot Rainbow Beet Seeds
  • New
Beetroot Seeds - Egyptian

100 Seeds Egyptian Beetroot

Price €1.15
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>100 Seeds Egyptian Beetroot (Beta vulgaris)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <p class="">Heirloom variety dating back to 1800’s that produces a flattish beetroot with dark red flesh that has lighter zones.<br><br>‘Beetroot Flat of Egypt’ is a very old heritage variety with a flattened heart-shaped root. It is known by a number of variants on the name - The ‘Egyptian Flat Rooted Beetroot’, ‘Egyptian Beetroot’ or even, would you believe, The ‘Egyptian Turnip Rooted Beetroot’!<br>Originating in Egypt, (although you may never have guessed), it was first described in the early 1800s and was common in seed catalogs from 1870. In 1885, Vilmorin said “An exceedingly early variety and certainly the best of the early kitchen-garden kinds”. In France it is better known as Betterave 'Rouge Noir Plate d’Egypte'.<br><br>Egyptian Beetroot produces smooth-skinned roots, often heart-shaped, wider than tall, with a deep red, tender, and flavorsome flesh. Its interior has no fibrous 'strings' and its sweet flesh is a deep crimson/burgundy. It is particularly good when eaten raw, for instance when grated in salads.<br>The plants are shorter than conventional beet relatives and the leaves are a beautiful blend of emerald green and crimson/burgundy.<br><br>Egyptian Beetroot has rapid early season growth and, as most of the root forms above the ground, the mature beet can be pulled rather than dug in 50 to 60 days. It is ideal for early sowings in cold frames and for successional sowing outside for a prolonged cropping period. It is at its best when grown in spring and summer as the exposed mature beetroot does not enjoy hard frosts.<br>The plants are quick growing, very early maturing, and resistant to bolting. They are recommended for shallow soils and growing in cold frames and can be grown closer together than most heritage varieties because the plants do not develop large tops.</p> </div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 230 (1,5g)
Beetroot Seeds - Egyptian
  • New
Beetroot Seeds 'Monika'

Beetroot Seeds Monika

Price €1.35
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Beetroot Seeds 'Monika' (Beta vulgaris)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>A splendid variety with so many advantages. Virtually no thinning is required, being a monogerm type, and it is also highly bolt-resistant. Perfect for both early and later sowings, we love the baby beets pickled in sweet vinegar.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>How to grow Beetroot:</strong></p> </div> <div>Beetroot is remarkably easy to grow and can be grown across a wide range of climates. It prefers moist, sunny conditions with not excessive heat. It is sown as a warm-season crop in most regions but performs best during the cooler, drier months in tropical zones where it may prefer some shade in summer conditions</div> <div>Beetroot can be sown from very early in the season until late and can be grown in raised beds or containers all year round. Sow the seeds closer together for cutting and use in baby leaf salads, they can be constantly thinned, as you need them throughout the growing period. The young shoots are also deliciously sweet.&nbsp;</div> <div>Beetroot seeds are clustered together with each cork-like fruit containing two or three seeds. Once germinated, they require thinning out early to avoid root disturbance. (Some varieties have been bred to only produce one seed and are called 'Monogerm' seeds).</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Position:</strong></p> </div> <div>Beetroot prefer to be grown in light, sandy soil in a sunny position, but can tolerate pretty much any sort of soil and some shade will be tolerated, a pH of 6.0-7.0 is fine but if you know your soil is too acid dig in some lime.&nbsp;</div> <div>Dig over the site with a spade (preferably in the autumn prior to sowing). Remove perennial weeds and large stones as these can cause the roots to become mis-shapen</div> <div>Level roughly and then work over the area with a rake to leave a fine finish. If you can, two or three weeks before sowing, spread a general granular fertiliser across the site and rake into the soil. Do not add manure to the soil as this will cause the roots to develop incorrectly.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>When to sow Beetroot: </strong><br>Late spring to autumn.</p> </div> <div>Beetroots can be grown from early spring onwards if grown indoors or undercover.&nbsp;</div> <div>Seeds can be planted directly into the ground after the threat of frost has passed. Beetroots are best planted at soil temperatures between 7°C and 25°C. The best quality beetroots are grown at temperatures of 10 to 18°C (50 to 65°F).The crops will tolerate light frost.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>How to sow Beetroot:</strong></p> </div> <div>The seeds require plenty of moisture to germinate. Soaking them in warm water for an hour or two prior to planting is a great way to speed up germination. Expected germination time 10 to 14 days.&nbsp;</div> <div>Prevent a glut when planting beetroot by sowing your seed in stages, a small batch at a time every couple of weeks will give a continuous harvest.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Sowing Indoors: </strong><br>From February</p> </div> <div>Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot, at a depth of 25mm (1in). When the seedlings emerge there may be more than one from each seed cluster. When they are about 5cm (2in) tall, carefully separate these into individual plants prior to planting out (only transplant the strongest seedlings). This will avoid seedlings competing with one another and prevent a distorted, misshapen harvest.&nbsp;</div> <div>Successful transplanting can be carried out as soon as plants have formed their first true leaves. Unlike other root crops, beetroot seedlings transplant reasonably well providing they are not too large and are kept moist when transplanting.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Sowing Direct: </strong><br>From May</p> </div> <div>It is best to sow beetroot seeds directly into the ground when the temperature of the soil has warmed to about 7°C (44°F). Sow thinly in prepared seed beds. Where plants are sown direct it is important to thin the multiple seedlings back to one plant. If carefully removed, the thinnings can be transplanted to form additional rows.</div> <div>The spacing is quite important. If you wish to grow small, pickling size beets, they need to be sown quite close together, about 5cm (2in) apart, in rows 15cm (6in) apart. If you wish to grow standard size beetroots, then sow about 10cm (4in) apart, in rows that are at least 30cm (12in) apart.</div> <div>Cover lightly with 25mm (1in) of fine soil. Firm gently, water well and keep moist.&nbsp;</div> <div>Seedlings appear in 7 to 21 days. When large enough thin to at least 10cm (4in) apart.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Cultivation:&nbsp;</strong></p> </div> <div>Keep the rows weed free and the seedlings well watered. Once the roots have developed and they start to swell, beetroots need to be watered moderately. Beetroot has shallow roots and it is important to keep the plants moist. If they experience long dry periods, the beetroot will become hairy and fibrous. Intermittent or inadequate watering can result in stress cracks and breakdown of roots. Don't overwater as this only encourages leaf growth and not bulb growth.&nbsp;</div> <div> <p>During cool weather, the plants can be watered once a week. During very hot weather, less water can be given two to three times a week instead of a lot of water once a week.</p> </div> <div> <p><strong>Companion Planting:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Good Companions - Onions, Silverbeet, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Cabbage, Dwarf Beans. Aromatic Herbs, Celery, Chamomile, Spinach, Chard.</p> </div> <div>Bad Companions - tall beans, runner beans.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Common Problems:&nbsp;</strong></p> </div> <div>Boron deficiency is sometimes seen in root vegetable crops. This causes leaf yellowing and scorching. It is very rare if general purpose fertiliser is used that includes trace elements such as boron, magnesium, manganese, iron and molybdenum.</div> <div>Fungal leaf spots and rust sometimes occur on beetroot leaves. These are worse when plants are poorly grown (lack of sun, water and nutrients) or planted at the wrong time of year. Avoid growing beetroot during most humid time of the year in tropical regions, improve air circulation, reduce nitrogen applications and avoid excessive wetting of the foliage. Apply seaweed sprays to build disease resistance and supply trace elements.</div> <div>Slugs or snails may eat the leaves. Repellent molasses or chilli spray, or barriers and traps to control slugs and snails may be required in extreme cases.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Propagation:</strong></p> </div> <div>Beetroot are both wind and insect pollinated; they will cross with silverbeet, chard and other beets.&nbsp;</div> <div>Plants are biennial, producing vegetative growth in the first season and flowers and seed in the second. If plants bolt, eat do not allow to go to seed.</div> <div>Do not have two varieties in flower at the same time or isolate plants to keep different strains pure. Where possible, allow at least three to four plants of one variety that show good growth and disease resistance for flowering and seed production.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Harvesting:&nbsp;</strong></p> </div> <div>Beetroot is ready to be picked when the roots are between the size of a golf ball and a tennis ball – this is usually 12 to 16 weeks after sowing. The smaller the root the better the quality.&nbsp;</div> <div>Pull from all along the row and not just in one place, as this thins out the rows, allowing more space for the other beetroot to grow. To harvest, gently hold the tops and lift while levering under the root with a hand fork. Remove the tops by twisting them off with your hands to prevent the plants bleeding their juice – don’t throw these away, they have bags of taste and can be cooked and eaten like spinach. Store roots in dry sand, soil, or peat for winter use.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Culinary Uses:</strong></p> </div> <div>Before cooking beets, cut off the tops within a couple of inches of the top. This helps lock in the nutrients during cooking. When the tops are attached to any root vegetable, they leech the nutrients from the root. They should be cooked whole and then peeled; otherwise, they bleed all their colour and nutrients into the water.&nbsp;</div> <div>The deep-red roots are eaten Boiled, steamed or roasted as a vegetable (if roasted, cover with lemon juice to stop browning). They can be eaten cold as a salad after cooking and adding oil and vinegar, or raw and shredded.&nbsp;</div> <div>A large proportion of commercial production is processed into boiled and sterilised beets or into pickles. In Eastern Europe beet soup, such as cold borscht, is a popular dish. Beetroot leaves are lovely in a salad or cooked. Use as you would spinach.</div> <div>Beetroot can easily be stored for later use, and the most common method is by pickling them in vinegar.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Storing:</strong></p> </div> <div>The greens and the roots should be stored separately as the greens are highly perishable, but the roots can last for some time in storage. Another method to store beetroot is pickling and making chutney.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Other Uses:</strong></p> </div> <div>Beetroot is known for staining the tablecloth, but can be used to make an excellent natural dye. It gives a fantastic range of colours, from yellow, through reds to browns, dependent on the type of mordant used. Within older bulbs of beetroot, the colour is a deeper crimson and the flesh is much softer. Beetroot dye may also be used in ink.</div> <div>Betanin, obtained from the roots, is used industrially as red food colourants, e.g. to improve the colour of tomato paste, sauces, desserts, jams and jellies, ice cream, sweets and breakfast cereals.</div> <div> <p></p> <p><strong>Origin:</strong></p> </div> <div>Beetroot are biennial plants grown as annuals and harvested for their swollen root tuber and leaves. The type of wild plant from which it came, had thin, poor roots and was native to the Mediterranean but spread eastwards into West Asia. It was known as a vegetable as early as 300 BC but was only introduced into Germany and Britain around the sixteenth century.</div> <div>Beetroots are related to the sugar beet and to swiss chard, the foliage beets that are grown for the greens and not the root.</div> <div> <p></p> <p class=""><strong>History:&nbsp;</strong></p> </div> <div>From the Middle Ages, beetroot was used as a treatment for a variety of conditions, especially illnesses relating to digestion and the blood. Platina recommended taking beetroot with garlic to nullify the effects of 'garlic-breath'.</div> <div>Since Roman times, beetroot juice has been considered an aphrodisiac and natural Viagra.&nbsp;</div> <div>It is a rich source of the element boron, which plays an important role in the production of human sex hormones. Field Marshal Montgomery is reputed to have exhorted his troops to 'take favours in the beetroot fields', a euphemism for visiting prostitutes.</div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 33 (1g)
Beetroot Seeds 'Monika'
  • New
Beetroot Seeds “Cylindra”

Beetroot Seeds Cylindra

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <h2><strong>Beetroot Seeds&nbsp;“Cylindra” (Beta vulgaris var. crassa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #e03e2d;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of&nbsp;100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Beetroot Cylindra, as its name suggests is a cylindrical (half-long or stump-rooted) beetroot. Smooth-skinned with dark purple-red flesh, it grows a dark red, elongated root 7 to 10cm (6 to 8in) long.&nbsp;</div> <div>This unique variety has a very fine, smooth texture with little fibre, the root maintains its sweetness and tenderness over a long growing season and does not get woody.&nbsp;</div> <div>The roots are sweet with an earthy-caramel taste, especially lovely when roasted. The roots stand proud above the soil, but can be earthed up, and remain in good condition a long period. The red-green leaves are sweeter and more “beety” tasting than other beet leaves.</div> <div>Beetroot Cylindra matures medium early, a little more slowly than globe-shaped beetroot, but because of its cylindrical root shape can be and can be spaced more closely together, making it productive in small spaces. Because of its uniform width, it is ideal for cutting into uniform slices (it is sometimes called Butter Slicer), perfect for slicing, pickling and canning.&nbsp;</div> <div>There are quite a number of myths about this beautiful beetroot.</div> <div>Some sources, both on the web and printed in books, state that Cylindra is an old English or Danish variety. ('recorded by 1840 and widely grown by 1880'.), but Cylindra is apparently a relatively young beetroot. It was first brought to market and entered in a French catalogue in 1968-69. We have not managed to find earlier references, which mentions Cylindra.</div> <div>Several sources also refer to Cylindra being synonymous with Formanova, again, we have not managed to find sources, which have confirmed this.</div> <div>How to grow Beetroot:</div> <div>Beetroot are remarkably easy to grow and can be grown across a wide range of climates. It prefers moist, sunny conditions with not excessive heat. It is sown as a warm season crop in most regions, but performs best during the cooler, drier months in tropical zones where it may prefer some shade in summer conditions</div> <div>Beetroot can be sown from very early in the season until late and can be grown in raised beds or containers all year round. Sow the seeds closer together for cutting and use in baby leaf salads, they can be constantly thinned, as you need them throughout the growing period. The young shoots are also deliciously sweet.&nbsp;</div> <div>Beetroot seeds are clustered together with each cork-like fruit containing two or three seeds. Once germinated, they require thinning out early to avoid root disturbance. (Some varieties have been bred to only produce one seed and are called 'Monogerm' seeds).</div> <div>Position:</div> <div>Beetroot prefer to be grown in light, sandy soil in a sunny position, but can tolerate pretty much any sort of soil and some shade will be tolerated, a pH of 6.0-7.0 is fine but if you know your soil is too acid dig in some lime.&nbsp;</div> <div>Dig over the site with a spade (preferably in the autumn prior to sowing). Remove perennial weeds and large stones as these can cause the roots to become mis-shapen</div> <div>Level roughly and then work over the area with a rake to leave a fine finish. If you can, two or three weeks before sowing, spread a general granular fertiliser across the site and rake into the soil. Do not add manure to the soil as this will cause the roots to develop incorrectly.</div> <div>When to sow Beetroot: Late spring to autumn.</div> <div>Beetroots can be grown from early spring onwards if grown indoors or undercover.&nbsp;</div> <div>Seeds can be planted directly into the ground after the threat of frost has passed. Beetroots are best planted at soil temperatures between 7°C and 25°C. The best quality beetroots are grown at temperatures of 10 to 18°C (50 to 65°F).The crops will tolerate light frost.</div> <div>How to sow Beetroot:</div> <div>The seeds require plenty of moisture to germinate. Soaking them in warm water for an hour or two prior to planting is a great way to speed up germination. Expected germination time 10 to 14 days.&nbsp;</div> <div>Prevent a glut when planting beetroot by sowing your seed in stages, a small batch at a time every couple of weeks will give a continuous harvest.</div> <div>Sowing Indoors: From February</div> <div>Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot, at a depth of 25mm (1in). When the seedlings emerge there may be more than one from each seed cluster. When they are about 5cm (2in) tall, carefully separate these into individual plants prior to planting out (only transplant the strongest seedlings). This will avoid seedlings competing with one another and prevent a distorted, misshapen harvest.&nbsp;</div> <div>Successful transplanting can be carried out as soon as plants have formed their first true leaves. Unlike other root crops, beetroot seedlings transplant reasonably well providing they are not too large and are kept moist when transplanting.</div> <div>Sowing Direct: From May</div> <div>It is best to sow beetroot seeds directly into the ground when the temperature of the soil has warmed to about 7°C (44°F). Sow thinly in prepared seed beds. Where plants are sown direct it is important to thin the multiple seedlings back to one plant. If carefully removed, the thinnings can be transplanted to form additional rows.</div> <div>The spacing is quite important. If you wish to grow small, pickling size beets, they need to be sown quite close together, about 5cm (2in) apart, in rows 15cm (6in) apart. If you wish to grow standard size beetroots, then sow about 10cm (4in) apart, in rows that are at least 30cm (12in) apart.</div> <div>Cover lightly with 25mm (1in) of fine soil. Firm gently, water well and keep moist.&nbsp;</div> <div>Seedlings appear in 7 to 21 days. When large enough thin to at least 10cm (4in) apart.</div> <div>Cultivation:&nbsp;</div> <div>Keep the rows weed free and the seedlings well watered. Once the roots have developed and they start to swell, beetroots need to be watered moderately. Beetroot has shallow roots and it is important to keep the plants moist. If they experience long dry periods, the beetroot will become hairy and fibrous. Intermittent or inadequate watering can result in stress cracks and breakdown of roots. Don't overwater as this only encourages leaf growth and not bulb growth.&nbsp;</div> <div>During cool weather, the plants can be watered once a week. During very hot weather, less water can be given two to three times a week instead of a lot of water once a week.</div> <div>Companion Planting:&nbsp;</div> <div>Good Companions - Onions, Silverbeet, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Cabbage, Dwarf Beans. Aromatic Herbs, Celery, Chamomile, Spinach, Chard.</div> <div>Bad Companions - tall beans, runner beans.</div> <div>Common Problems:&nbsp;</div> <div>Boron deficiency is sometimes seen in root vegetable crops. This causes leaf yellowing and scorching. It is very rare if general purpose fertiliser is used that includes trace elements such as boron, magnesium, manganese, iron and molybdenum.</div> <div>Fungal leaf spots and rust sometimes occur on beetroot leaves. These are worse when plants are poorly grown (lack of sun, water and nutrients) or planted at the wrong time of year. Avoid growing beetroot during most humid time of the year in tropical regions, improve air circulation, reduce nitrogen applications and avoid excessive wetting of the foliage. Apply seaweed sprays to build disease resistance and supply trace elements.</div> <div>Slugs or snails may eat the leaves. Repellent molasses or chilli spray, or barriers and traps to control slugs and snails may be required in extreme cases.</div> <div>Propagation:</div> <div>Beetroot are both wind and insect pollinated; they will cross with silverbeet, chard and other beets.&nbsp;</div> <div>Plants are biennial, producing vegetative growth in the first season and flowers and seed in the second. If plants bolt, eat do not allow to go to seed.</div> <div>Do not have two varieties in flower at the same time or isolate plants to keep different strains pure. Where possible, allow at least three to four plants of one variety that show good growth and disease resistance for flowering and seed production.</div> <div>Harvesting:&nbsp;</div> <div>Beetroot is ready to be picked when the roots are between the size of a golf ball and a tennis ball – this is usually 12 to 16 weeks after sowing. The smaller the root the better the quality.&nbsp;</div> <div>Pull from all along the row and not just in one place, as this thins out the rows, allowing more space for the other beetroot to grow. To harvest, gently hold the tops and lift while levering under the root with a hand fork. Remove the tops by twisting them off with your hands to prevent the plants bleeding their juice – don’t throw these away, they have bags of taste and can be cooked and eaten like spinach. Store roots in dry sand, soil, or peat for winter use.</div> <div>Culinary Uses:</div> <div>Before cooking beets, cut off the tops within a couple of inches of the top. This helps lock in the nutrients during cooking. When the tops are attached to any root vegetable, they leech the nutrients from the root. They should be cooked whole and then peeled; otherwise, they bleed all their colour and nutrients into the water.&nbsp;</div> <div>The deep-red roots are eaten Boiled, steamed or roasted as a vegetable (if roasted, cover with lemon juice to stop browning). They can be eaten cold as a salad after cooking and adding oil and vinegar, or raw and shredded.&nbsp;</div> <div>A large proportion of commercial production is processed into boiled and sterilised beets or into pickles. In Eastern Europe beet soup, such as cold borscht, is a popular dish. Beetroot leaves are lovely in a salad or cooked. Use as you would spinach.</div> <div>Beetroot can easily be stored for later use, and the most common method is by pickling them in vinegar.</div> <div>Storing:</div> <div>The greens and the roots should be stored separately as the greens are highly perishable, but the roots can last for some time in storage. Another method to store beetroot is pickling and making chutney.</div> <div>Other Uses:</div> <div>Beetroot is known for staining the tablecloth, but can be used to make an excellent natural dye. It gives a fantastic range of colours, from yellow, through reds to browns, dependent on the type of mordant used. Within older bulbs of beetroot, the colour is a deeper crimson and the flesh is much softer. Beetroot dye may also be used in ink.</div> <div>Betanin, obtained from the roots, is used industrially as red food colourants, e.g. to improve the colour of tomato paste, sauces, desserts, jams and jellies, ice cream, sweets and breakfast cereals.</div> <div>Origin:</div> <div>Beetroot are biennial plants grown as annuals and harvested for their swollen root tuber and leaves. The type of wild plant from which it came, had thin, poor roots and was native to the Mediterranean but spread eastwards into West Asia. It was known as a vegetable as early as 300 BC but was only introduced into Germany and Britain around the sixteenth century.</div> <div>Beetroots are related to the sugar beet and to swiss chard, the foliage beets that are grown for the greens and not the root.</div> <div>History:&nbsp;</div> <div>From the Middle Ages, beetroot was used as a treatment for a variety of conditions, especially illnesses relating to digestion and the blood. Platina recommended taking beetroot with garlic to nullify the effects of 'garlic-breath'.</div> <div>Since Roman times, beetroot juice has been considered an aphrodisiac and natural Viagra.&nbsp;</div> <div>It is a rich source of the element boron, which plays an important role in the production of human sex hormones. Field Marshal Montgomery is reputed to have exhorted his troops to 'take favours in the beetroot fields', a euphemism for visiting prostitutes.</div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script> </div> </div> </div>
VE 31 (1g)
Beetroot Seeds “Cylindra”
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Exotic Beetroot Seeds - Chioggia

Exotic Beetroot Seeds -...

Price €1.55
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Exotic Beetroot Seeds - Chioggia</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 15 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This traditional Italian globe shaped beetroot has dark green leaves and deep red stems. When sliced unusual red and white rings are exposed, adding an attractive element to the salad plate. Sweet taste. Suitable for use in salads or as a hot vegetable.</p> <p><strong>Sowing Instructions:</strong></p> <p><strong>Site &amp; Soil</strong></p> <p>Beetroot's ideal soil is medium to light, although a heavy but well-dug soil will also be OK. What it definitely does not like is a soil which has recently been manured - this will cause the roots to be mis-shapen. The soil should be neutral or slightly alkaline ('pH' 6.5 to 7.5) although it is tolerant of most normal conditions.</p> <p><strong>When to Sow</strong></p> <p>Beetroot should be sown when the danger of hard frost has passed, mid-April is about right. In order to avoid glut, plant in small batches up until mid-July. If you want beetroot crops three or four weeks earlier, use a small poly-tunnel or cloche. Simply place the poly-tunnel in position two weeks before sowing (to warm up the soil), then sow the seed three or four weeks earlier than normal.</p> <p><strong>How to Sow</strong></p> <p>With a trowel, scoop out a line in the soil about 2.5cm (1in) deep - where more than one line is to be planted, space each line about 30cm (1ft) apart. Space the seeds in the lines 5cm (2in) apart and cover with soil. Water if the soil is dry.</p>
P 80
Exotic Beetroot Seeds - Chioggia
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Beetroot Seeds Golden Detroit

Golden Beetroot Seeds...

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Golden Beetroot Seeds Golden Detroit</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 25 seeds</strong></span></h2> <p>This is a productive variety of golden yellow beetroot that produces extremely large fruits, delicious flavor, golden-yellow color retained when cooked. It is used as an ordinary beetroot and can be used for sweet as well as for preparing many other dishes, as well as for arranging.</p> <p>Its greatest advantage is its taste, which is pleasant in contrast to the heavy taste of ordinary beetroot. Mature roots do not become fibrous.</p> <p>From this beetroot, your hands will not be colored like by ordinary beetroot.</p> <p>In addition, the leaves can be harvested and utilized as spinach throughout the season. Good resistance to bolting (What is Bolting? When a plant goes to flower, tastes of the plant will change) and stores well. </p> <p>Ripening time: 55 days.</p> <p>If you sow after every few weeks over the summer, you will be supplied with these vegetables until late summer.</p> <p>Sow seeds in spring after the last frost.</p> <p>Sow 1cm deep in rows 30cm apart.</p> <p>Pre-soaking seed in warm water 1 hour before sowing will speed up germination.</p> </body> </html>
P 70
Beetroot Seeds Golden Detroit
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Swiss Chard Rainbow Seeds

Swiss Chard Rainbow Seeds

Price €1.90
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Swiss Chard Rainbow Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 55+- (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Rainbow chard, which is extremely popular not only because of its rich colors! Remains a bit smaller than the white Swiss chard, but is more resistant and withstands winter protection even when planted outdoors. The outer leaves are harvested, if the weather permits, this can be done until the end of November. The stems can be cooked or steamed as vegetables, the young leaves are also for raw consumption e.g. best suited in salads. Because of its color, it is also a real eye-catcher as a decorative plant in the perennial border. It should be in a sunny location on freshly moist soil.</p> <p>Origin: France</p> <p>Ripening time: 70 days (medium early)</p> <p>Leaves: medium to 40 cm</p> <p>Plant height: 50 cm</p> </body> </html>
VE 11 (1g)
Swiss Chard Rainbow Seeds
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Swiss Chard Seeds 'White Silver' 1.45 - 2

Swiss Chard Seeds White Silver

Price €1.45
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Swiss Chard Seeds 'White Silver'</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 (1.9g) or 1600 (20g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <div>Chard 'White Silver' has the best flavour of any chard and looks wonderful with its chunky white-stems. A hugely long producing and worthwhile plant.&nbsp;Chard is one of my desert island veg because you can pick it for months on end and there are so many fantastic ways to cook it . Make sure to strip the white from the green, as they have different cooking times.</div> <div>For a delicious, nutritious and quick recipe for chard, try out a simple Chard and Coconut Soup for a family dinner.</div> </div> <div>Companion Plants: Celery, cucumbers, dill, garlic, hyssop, lettuce, mint, nasturtium, onions, potatoes, rosemary, sage, spinach,&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <table border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Name &amp; Variety</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Chard 'White Silver'&nbsp;</em>(Beet Leaf, Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla)</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Soil Type:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">Richly manured ground. They like a rich soil, so dig in lots of organic material to planting position.</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Site:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">Full sun or partial shade</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Seed:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">For a constant supply throughout the year, sow undercover from February - March then direct sow in April - early September. Easy germination.</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Spacing:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">Plant seedlings 60cm apart if in rows. Sow 3-4 seeds in stations 23cm apart - leaving 35cm between the rows.</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Hardiness:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">Hardy</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Care tips:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">Protect with cloches in winter for good quality growth.</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Harvesting:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">The leaves will produce all year in the South or from April to December in the North. Harvest small leaves for salad from 8 weeks after sowing - a brilliant cut-and-come again crop.</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Cooking Notes:</strong></span></td> <td><span style="color: #008000;">Separate the white and the green for cooking, the white stems take 2-3 minutes longer (about 8mins) than the green leaves (5mins).</span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 99 (1,9g)
Swiss Chard Seeds 'White Silver' 1.45 - 2
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Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN 2.15 - 1

Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN

Price €2.15
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 160 (2g) seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><span style="color: #000000;">A really dark green spinach with heavily blistered, rounded leaves on semi-erect plants.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">The dark green heavily blistered leaves of Giant American can be harvested all through the summer and autumn months. A very productive variety.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Produces masses of heavily blistered dark green leaves.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Thin, juicy and sweetly flavoured.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Harvest during the summer and autumn.</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Suitable For - Vegetable plot, raised beds, container garden, limited space, window boxes</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Sowing Months - March - August</span></p> <p><span style="color: #000000;">Harvest - May - November</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 43 (2g)
Spinach Seeds GIANT AMERICAN 2.15 - 1
  • New
New Zealand Spinach Seeds (Tetragonia tetragonoides) 1.85 - 1

New Zealand Spinach Seeds...

Price €1.85
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>New Zealand Spinach Seeds (Tetragonia tetragonoides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tetragonia tetragonoides, commonly called New Zealand spinach and other local names, is a flowering plant in the fig-marigold family (Aizoaceae). It is often cultivated as a leafy vegetable.</p> <p>It is a widespread species, native to eastern Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. It has been introduced and is an invasive species in many parts of Africa, Europe, North America, and South America. Its natural habitat is sandy shorelines and bluffs, often in disturbed areas. It is a halophyte and grows well in the saline ground.</p> <p>The plant has a trailing habit and will form a thick carpet on the ground or climb through other vegetation and hang downwards. It can have erect growth when young. The leaves of the plant are 3–15 cm long, triangular in shape, and bright green. The leaves are thick and covered with tiny papillae that look like water drops on the top and bottom of the leaves. The flowers of the plant are yellow, and the fruit is a small, hard capsule covered with small horns.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The species, rarely used by indigenous people as a leaf vegetable, was first mentioned by Captain Cook. It was immediately picked, cooked, and pickled to help fight scurvy, and taken with the crew of the Endeavour.[6] It spread when the explorer and botanist Joseph Banks took seeds back to Kew Gardens during the latter half of the 18th century.[7] For two centuries, T. tetragonioides was the only cultivated vegetable to have originated from Australia and New Zealand.</p> <p>There are some indications that Māori did eat kōkihi perhaps more regularly. "To counteract the bitterness of the older leaves of this herb, the Māori boiled it with the roots of the convolvulus (pōhue)".</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>It is grown for the edible leaves and can be used as food or an ornamental plant for ground cover. As some of its names signify, it has similar flavor and texture properties to spinach and is cooked like spinach. Like spinach, it contains oxalates; its medium to low levels of oxalates needs to be removed by blanching the leaves in hot water[10] for one minute, then rinsing in cold water before cooking. It thrives in hot weather and is considered an heirloom vegetable. Few insects consume it, and even slugs and snails do not seem to feed on it.</p> <p>The thick, irregularly-shaped seeds should be planted just after the last spring frost. Before planting, the seeds should be soaked for 12 hours in cold water, or 3 hours in warm water. Seeds should be planted 5–10 mm (0.2–0.4 in) deep, and spaced 15–30 cm (5.9–11.8 in) apart. The seedlings will emerge in 10–20 days, and it will continue to produce greens through the summer. A mature plant will self-seed. Seeds will overwinter up to USDA zone 5.</p> <p><strong>Names</strong></p> <p>This widely distributed plant has many common names, depending on its location. In addition to the name New Zealand spinach, it is also known as Botany Bay spinach, Cook's cabbage, kōkihi (in Māori), sea spinach, and tetragon. Its Australian names of Warrigal Greens and Warrigal Cabbage[6] come from the local use of warrigal to describe plants that are wild (not farmed originally).</p>
P 448 NZ
New Zealand Spinach Seeds (Tetragonia tetragonoides) 1.85 - 1
  • New
Spinach Seeds Matador

Spinach Seeds Matador

Price €1.65
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Spinach Seeds Matador</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 2g (160) seeds.</strong></span><span><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;"><br></span></strong></span></h2> <p>Spinach Matador is an excellent early all round variety with oval and smooth leaves. Slow bolting spinach with a good mildew resistance. Excellent taste and texture, and is very slow to bolt.</p> <p>Late sowings will last well into winter. &nbsp;This spinach has it all.</p> <p>Sow the spinach seeds from early spring or in the autumn outside in a prepared bed 1 cm deep. &nbsp;Rich, weel drained soil is recommended. &nbsp;Thin out to 5-10cm apart as the seedlings appear. Water well in dry spells. Harvest the young leaves as required, picking only a few from each plant.</p> <p>Easy to grow, annual leaf vegetable. Crops for a long period.</p> <p>Can be sown in the autumn for winter leaves.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 26 (2g)
Spinach Seeds Matador
  • New