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Mushroom Mycelium

There are 6 products.

Showing 1-6 of 6 item(s)

White Truffle Mycelium (Tuber melanosporum)

White Truffle Mycelium...

Price €17.01
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>White Truffle Mycelium (Tuber magnatum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 30 or 50 ml.</strong></span></h2> <p><span><strong>We will use the same description, that we used for black Truffle. </strong></span></p> <p><span>Tuber melanosporum, called the black truffle, Périgord truffle or French black truffle, is a species of truffle native to Southern Europe. It is one of the most expensive edible mushrooms in the world.</span></p> <p><span>The round, dark brown fruiting bodies (ascocarps) have a black-brown skin with small pyramidal cusps. They have a strong, aromatic smell and normally reach a size of up to 10 cm (3.9 in). Some may be significantly larger, such as a black truffle found 2012 in Dordogne with a mass of 1.277 kg (2.82 lb).</span></p> <p><span>Their flesh is initially white, then dark. It is permeated by white veins which turn brown with age.[5] The spores are elliptical and measure about 22–55 µm by 20–35 µm.[3] They are dark brown and covered with large spikes.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Aroma</span></strong></p> <p><span>The fruiting bodies of the black truffle exude a scent reminiscent of undergrowth, strawberries, wet earth or dried fruit with a hint of cocoa. Their taste, which fully develops after the truffles are heated, is slightly peppery and bitter.[6] If stored at room temperature, the aromatic compounds dissipate, while storage at around the freezing point (0 °C) leads to an increased synthesis of these compounds.</span></p> <p><span>The volatile compounds that contribute to the aroma and are developed by the fruiting bodies include 2-methyl-1-butanol, isoamyl alcohol, 2-methylbutyraldehyde and 3-methylbutyraldehyde, as well as traces of sulfur compounds.[6][7] One of these, dimethyl sulfide, is what attracts truffle dogs, truffle hogs and truffle flies to the fruiting bodies.[8] Several species of yeast, which produce part of the aromatic compounds, have been isolated from Tuber melanosporum and Tuber magnatum.</span></p> <p><strong><span>You will need:</span></strong></p> <p><span>Mycelium - 1 pack.</span></p> <p><span>A tree in the suburban area (oak, beech or walnut).</span></p> <p><span>Ready-made soil for indoor plants with a high content of peat.</span></p> <ol> <li><span></span></li> </ol> <p><span>Moss, leaf litter, branches.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Growing method:</span></strong></p> <p><span>Favorable time for planting mycelium "Truffle Black" - from May to August.</span></p> <ol> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>Under the young deciduous trees (oak, beech, walnut) dig 3 holes with a diameter of 10 cm and a depth of 15 cm near the tree along the circumference.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="2"> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>The wells to half the depth should be filled with a compost prepared in advance - ground with a high content of peat, then decompose the pieces of composted mycelium into the wells, at the rate of 1/3 of the package per 1 hole. Cover the hole with compost to the brim, tightly seal.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="3"> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>Pour 1 liter of water gently and slowly through each hole. Also, moisten the soil around the wells, but already with plenty of water - at least 1 bucket per place. The soil on the plantation should not dry up. Cover the wells with a layer of moss, leaf litter, branches.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="4"> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>For the winter the plantation is covered with fallen leaves or straw. The fungus grows at a depth of 25-30 cm and is usually located in nests of 5-7 pieces.</span></li> </ol> <p><strong><span>Fruiting</span></strong></p> <p><span>25-30 year.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Productivity</span></strong></p> <p><span>Usually, the harvest is 25-30 Fruits per year, per season from one tree. Per 1qm 3,5-4,5 kg.</span></p> <h2><strong>Synonyme: <i>Tuber magnatum</i></strong></h2> <p></p> </body> </html>
P 401 W 30ml
White Truffle Mycelium (Tuber melanosporum)
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Black Truffle Mycelium (Tuber melanosporum)

Black Truffle Mycelium...

Price €17.00
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Black Truffle Mycelium (Tuber melanosporum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 60 ml.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Tuber melanosporum, called the black truffle, Périgord truffle or French black truffle, is a species of truffle native to Southern Europe. It is one of the most expensive edible mushrooms in the world.</span></p> <p><span>The round, dark brown fruiting bodies (ascocarps) have a black-brown skin with small pyramidal cusps. They have a strong, aromatic smell and normally reach a size of up to 10 cm (3.9 in). Some may be significantly larger, such as a black truffle found 2012 in Dordogne with a mass of 1.277 kg (2.82 lb).</span></p> <p><span>Their flesh is initially white, then dark. It is permeated by white veins which turn brown with age.[5] The spores are elliptical and measure about 22–55 µm by 20–35 µm.[3] They are dark brown and covered with large spikes.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Aroma</span></strong></p> <p><span>The fruiting bodies of the black truffle exude a scent reminiscent of undergrowth, strawberries, wet earth or dried fruit with a hint of cocoa. Their taste, which fully develops after the truffles are heated, is slightly peppery and bitter.[6] If stored at room temperature, the aromatic compounds dissipate, while storage at around the freezing point (0 °C) leads to an increased synthesis of these compounds.</span></p> <p><span>The volatile compounds that contribute to the aroma and are developed by the fruiting bodies include 2-methyl-1-butanol, isoamyl alcohol, 2-methylbutyraldehyde and 3-methylbutyraldehyde, as well as traces of sulfur compounds.[6][7] One of these, dimethyl sulfide, is what attracts truffle dogs, truffle hogs and truffle flies to the fruiting bodies.[8] Several species of yeast, which produce part of the aromatic compounds, have been isolated from Tuber melanosporum and Tuber magnatum.</span></p> <p><strong><span>You will need:</span></strong></p> <p><span>Mycelium - 1 pack.</span></p> <p><span>A tree in the suburban area (oak, beech or walnut).</span></p> <p><span>Ready-made soil for indoor plants with a high content of peat.</span></p> <ol> <li><span></span></li> </ol> <p><span>Moss, leaf litter, branches.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Growing method:</span></strong></p> <p><span>Favorable time for planting mycelium "Truffle Black" - from May to August.</span></p> <ol> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>Under the young deciduous trees (oak, beech, walnut) dig 3 holes with a diameter of 10 cm and a depth of 15 cm near the tree along the circumference.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="2"> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>The wells to half the depth should be filled with a compost prepared in advance - ground with a high content of peat, then decompose the pieces of composted mycelium into the wells, at the rate of 1/3 of the package per 1 hole. Cover the hole with compost to the brim, tightly seal.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="3"> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>Pour 1 liter of water gently and slowly through each hole. Also, moisten the soil around the wells, but already with plenty of water - at least 1 bucket per place. The soil on the plantation should not dry up. Cover the wells with a layer of moss, leaf litter, branches.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="4"> <li><span><span>       </span></span><span>For the winter the plantation is covered with fallen leaves or straw. The fungus grows at a depth of 25-30 cm and is usually located in nests of 5-7 pieces.</span></li> </ol> <p><strong><span>Fruiting</span></strong></p> <p><span>25-30 year.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Productivity</span></strong></p> <p><span>Usually the harvest is 25-30 Fruits per year, per season from one tree. Per 1qm 3,5-4,5 kg.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> </body> </html>
P 401 B 30 ml
Black Truffle Mycelium (Tuber melanosporum)
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Golden Oyster Mushroom Mycelium - Seeds (Pleurotus citrinopileatus)

Golden Oyster Mushroom...

Price €4.50
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Golden Oyster Mushroom Mycelium (Pleurotus citrinopileatus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0101;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 ml.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Yellow Oyster mushrooms have daffodil yellow, petal-shaped caps with ivory white stems. The cap is smooth and often convex with age. The margin can be smooth with a slight wave. The flesh is white and can be thin or thick depending on size, regardless its texture maintains a meaty and melting quality. The aroma is fruity and reminiscent of an aged red wine, a quality that permeates with cooking. The mushrooms' stem is short, often horizontal as it emerges perpendicular from its wooded host. The stems can be somewhat bitter. Yellow Oyster mushrooms are very fragile; handle with care.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Seasons/Availability</span></strong></p> <p><span>Cultivated Yellow Oyster mushrooms are available year-round, whereas wild Yellow Oyster mushrooms can be found in the fall and winter months.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Current Facts</span></strong></p> <p><span>Yellow Oyster mushrooms are scientifically classified as Pleurotus citrinopileatus, though they have also been classified under Pleurotus Cornucopiae and according to recent research should actually be categorized as a varietal of P. cornucopiae. They are most recognized as wild mushrooms, though they can also be cultivated. A range of other different colors, pink, blue, and gray can also be found in both wild and cultivated form. The mushrooms grow in tightly layered, non-uniformed clumps and are also recognized as Golden Oyster mushrooms.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Nutritional Value</span></strong></p> <p><span>Carotenoids, an amino acid essential to life, and the amount of lighting or sun received are what give the Yellow Oyster mushroom its vivid yellow color. The mushrooms contain higher levels of copper and zinc than in other cultivated mushrooms. Oyster mushrooms also contain several other essential amino acids in varying amounts, including folic acid, lovastatin (shown to lower cholesterol levels), and fatty acids.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Applications</span></strong></p> <p><span>Yellow Oyster mushrooms are best suited as a soup and stir fry mushroom or braising mushroom: their texture does not lend itself well to raw applications. The stems of the Yellow Oyster mushroom may be quite bitter to some individuals, in which case they should be removed and discarded. Yellow Oyster mushrooms pair well with seafood, pork, garlic, ginger, soy, tomatoes, Asian vegetables and pot herbs. Traditional recipes include stir fries, curries and soups and these are good starting points if you have never cooked with Yellow Oyster mushroom before. Modern recipes include companion ingredients such as clams, fennel, wild arugula, fresh and melting cheeses, cured meats such as prosciutto, wild ramps, black garlic and young shallots. To store, place in paper bag or between paper towels. Never store fresh mushrooms in plastic as the plastic deteriorates the flesh rapidly.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Ethnic/Cultural Info</span></strong></p> <p><span>All varieties of Oyster mushrooms can be used for successful mycoremediation, which is the process of growing mushrooms to clean the earth. Oyster mushrooms have been shown to clean soil of crude oil after oil spills, PCP (a wood preservative), wastewater and pesticide-contaminated wastes. The mushrooms not only degrade the pollutants in the soil or water, they also mineralize the pollutant so it will return to the air as ammonia, carbon dioxide, chlorine and water.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Geography/History</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Yellow Oyster mushroom is native to eastern Russia, northern China and Japan. It is a wide-spread mushroom that has naturalized in many different Western and Northern Hemisphere regions with a prevalence in North America and other continents, growing readily on dead wood year-round and specifically flourishing in autumn forests, cascading in tight shelf-like patterns along dead hardwood deciduous trees. All Oyster mushroom strains need moist conditions to fruit, although different strains fruit in different temperature ranges. Many available Yellow Oyster mushrooms have been cultivated, as they are easy to grow. Home growing kits are available.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Recipe Ideas</span></strong></p> <p><span>Recipes that include Yellow Oyster Mushrooms. One  is easiest, three is harder.</span></p> <p><span>eCurry                  Spicy Oyster Mushroom in Banana Leaves</span></p> <p><span>Cookstr                               Roasted Yellow Oyster Mushrooms and Arugula Bruschetta with Basil Purée</span></p> <p><span>The Whole Gang                             Asparagus, Potato and Oyster Mushroom Tart</span></p> <p><span>The New York Times                      Cardoon Soup With Coddled Oysters And Oyster Mushrooms</span></p> <p><span>So Hungry I Could Blog                 Shaved White Turnip and Bok Choy with Golden Oyster Mushrooms</span></p> <p><span>All Things Considered Yummy!                 Cilantro and Coconut Roasted Chicken with Golden Oyster Mushrooms</span></p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r10GqUKmSbc" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener">GROWING MUSHROOMS ON YOUR OWN SUBSTRATE AND CONTAINER VIDEO</a></strong></h2>
P 402 Y
Golden Oyster Mushroom Mycelium - Seeds (Pleurotus citrinopileatus)
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White Oyster Mushroom Mycelium Spores Seeds (Pleurotus cornucopiae) 3 - 10

White Oyster Mushroom...

Price €3.00
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>White Oyster Mushroom Mycelium Spores Seeds (Pleurotus cornucopiae)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f60202;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 ml.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Pleurotus cornucopiae is a species of edible fungus in the genus Pleurotus, It is quite similar to the better-known Pleurotus ostreatus, and like that species is cultivated and sold in markets in Europe and China, but it is distinguished because its gills are very decurrent, forming a network on the stem.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Naming</span></strong></p> <p><span>The species name means "of the Cornucopia" (Horn of Plenty), which is appropriate since the mushrooms are edible and sometimes take on a shape similar to a drinking horn.</span></p> <p><span>The original definition of this species, or basionym, was made by Jean-Jacques Paulet in 1793 as Dendrosarcos cornucopiae. At a time when most gilled mushrooms were lumped into genus Agaricus, Paulet invented genus Dendrosarcos, later Latinised to Dendrosarcus, for those having an excentric or missing stipe. In fact those fungi have not been found to be a closely related group, and today the name only has historical interest, though the taxonomic rules imply that it still needs to be recorded. In 1871 in his "Führer in die Pilzkunde" ("Guide to Mycology"), Paul Kummer introduced Pleurotus as a genus,[4] but the allocation of P. cornucopiae to it was only done later in 1910 by Léon Louis Rolland.</span></p> <p><span>The synonym Pleurotus sapidus due to Schulzer (1873) is sometimes seen</span></p> <p><span>The English name "Branched Oyster Mushroom" has been given to this species.</span></p> <p><strong><span>General</span></strong></p> <p><span>The cap grows to about 15 cm, with a pale yellowish, brownish or greyish surface. At most there may be very slight traces of the veil.</span></p> <p><span>The stem is always present, may be forked and can vary from excentric to fairly central. Each stem may be up to about 11 cm long and up to 2 cm thick.</span></p> <p><span>The whitish gills are decurrent down the stem and anastomose (criss-cross), becoming a network of ridges at the bottom.</span></p> <p><span>The strong smell has an aniseed element and is also floury when the mushroom is cut. The taste is floury.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Distribution, habitat &amp; ecology</span></strong></p> <p><span>This mushroom is saprobic on dead wood and can also be a weak parasite.[8] It occurs stumps and fallen trunks of oak, beech, elm, and other broad-leaved trees.</span></p> <p><span>Appearing from spring to late summer, it is distributed in the wild throughout Europe, where it varies locally between common and fairly rare.[7] It is also reported from the U.S. and Mexico.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Similar species</span></strong></p> <p><span>P. cornucopiae is quite similar to the well-known food mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, being distinguished because in the latter case, the gills are not very decurrent and the cap colour is slate or bluish grey. Another species, Pleurotus pulmonarius has a comparable cap colour to P. cornucopiae but the gills on the stipe are similar to P. ostreatus.</span></p> <p><span>It is even more closely related to the yellow-capped "golden oyster mushroom", Pleurotus citrinopileatus, which is native to eastern Asia. The forms are easily distinguishable by the cap colour, but they are sometimes considered to be just varieties of the same species, and as a consequence golden oyster mushrooms are sometimes identified using the older scientific name Pleurotus cornucopiae.[12] However, according to the mycological reference "Species Fungorum", these are two separate species.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Human impact</span></strong></p> <p><span>This mushroom is edible and it is cultivated in a manner similar to P. ostreatus, though less extensively.[14] For instance a Chinese paper evaluated several commercially available varieties of P. cornucopiae and reported that it in the Shanghai area an appropriate growth medium is cotton-seed hulls and wood-chips, with 65% water content.[15] Another paper (actually treating the yellow-topped form) also suggested pasteurized switch grass as a useful substrate, though the yield was less than with cotton-seed hulls and straw.</span></p> <p><span>It is a mild parasite of broad-leaved trees.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>GROWING INSTRUCTION Oyster </span></strong></h2> <p><strong><span>Growing of mushrooms on wood (extensive method)</span></strong></p> <p><span>Oyster mushrooms are grown on tree stumps in greenhouses or cellars, in shady places on the plot. Freshly chopped aspen, poplar or oak trunks are cut into chunks 30-40 cm in length and 15-25 cm in diameter. In the prepared sections, holes with a depth of 4-5 cm are drilled. And a diameter of 2 cm. Or make the notches over the entire area, or the notches with an ax. In these holes put a little mycelium, then cover with pieces of bark, chips, sawdust or moss, so that the mycelium does not fall out of them. The air in the room should not be dry, with a relative humidity of 90%. At lower humidity, water can be sprayed. In 2-3 months the mycelium of the fungus permeates all the churks. In the future, the chocks can be taken out of the room and each chuck is buried in the ground at 10-15 cm deep in a shaded place, where direct sunlight does not reach. And you can land at once in the garden, moreover, at any time of the year, even in winter. Morozov mycelium is not afraid. During this period it is necessary to water chocks. Mushrooms, planted on wood, grow 5-6 years.</span></p> <p><span>Rate of consumption: one package of mycelium is enough for 50 kg of wood.</span></p> <p><span>Growing mushrooms on plant residues (intensive method)</span></p> <p><strong><span>Substrate</span></strong></p> <p><span>Straw or sunflower husks are used as a substrate. Straw and husk must be of good quality, without signs of rot and mold. Before processing, it is desirable to chop the straw, at home it will be sufficient to grind to 3-7 cm. Grinding makes the straw compact and more accessible to the enzymes of the mycelium.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Substrate preparation</span></strong></p> <p><span>For home use, simple pasteurization options can be used, for example, with boiling water. The substrate is poured with water at a temperature of 80-90 ° C and held for 3-4 hours for husks or 7-8 hours for straw. Then the water is drained, and the substrate (straw or husk) should cool to a temperature of 20-30 ° C. Before sowing the mycelium and packing, the moisture content of the substrate is approximately determined: if the substrate is compressed in the hand, water droplets should appear between the fingers, which corresponds to the optimum humidity of the substrate-70%. In case of waterlogging, water will flow down in trickles.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Formation of substrate blocks</span></strong></p> <p><span>Then, the well cooled and wrung out substrate is mixed with the mycelium. Put the compost in a transparent plastic bag. To tie. For air exchange, make several incisions 3-5 cm across the entire area of ​​the package. A ready-made mushroom block was obtained.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Fruiting</span></strong></p> <p><span>Germination of mycelium lasts 15 - 18 days at a temperature of 14 - 28 ° C. When fruiting, natural and active ventilation is used. Illuminate substrate blocks only during fruiting, and in open areas and in rooms with windows, normal day-night mode is considered. In those places where the rudiments of fruiting bodies appeared, they carefully cut the film. Fruiting takes 2-3 weeks. In 5-7 days between the waves. The first three waves bring the greatest harvest. Yield 35-40% of the weight of the substrate.</span></p> <p><span>Rate of application: 2% of the mycelium from the total mass of the moistened, soaked substrate.</span></p> <h2><strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r10GqUKmSbc" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener">Growing Mushrooms on Your Own Substrate and Container VIDEO</a><br /></strong></h2>
P 402 W
White Oyster Mushroom Mycelium Spores Seeds (Pleurotus cornucopiae) 3 - 10
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Lingzhi Mushroom Or Reishi Mushroom, Mycelium, Spores, Seeds

Lingzhi, Reishi Mushroom,...

Price €5.00
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Lingzhi Mushroom Or Reishi Mushroom, Mycelium, Spores, Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 Dowels / Plugs.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>The lingzhi mushroom or reishi mushroom (traditional Chinese: 靈芝; pinyin: língzhī; Japanese: 霊芝; rōmaji: reishi; Vietnamese: linh chi; literally: "soul/spirit mushroom") is a species complex that encompasses several fungal species of the genus Ganoderma, most commonly the closely related species Ganoderma lucidum, Ganoderma tsugae, and Ganoderma lingzhi. G. lingzhi[1] enjoys special veneration in East Asia, where it has been used as a medicinal mushroom in traditional Chinese medicine for more than 2,000 years,[2] making it one of the oldest mushrooms known to have been used medicinally.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Description</span></strong></p> <p><span>Lingzhi is a polypore mushroom that is soft (when fresh), corky, and flat, with a conspicuous red-varnished, kidney-shaped cap and, depending on specimen age, white to dull brown pores underneath.[9] It lacks gills on its underside and releases its spores through fine pores, leading to its morphological classification as a polypore.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Preparation</span></strong></p> <p><span>Because of its bitter taste, lingzhi is traditionally prepared as a hot water extract product.[51] Thinly sliced or pulverized lingzhi (either fresh or dried) is added to a pot of boiling water, the water is then reduced to a simmer, and the pot is covered; the lingzhi is then simmered for two hours.[citation needed] The resulting liquid is fairly bitter in taste and dark, with the more active red lingzhi more bitter than the black. The process is sometimes repeated for additional concentration. Alternatively, it can be used as an ingredient in a formula decoction or used to make an extract (in liquid, capsule, or powder form). The more active red forms of lingzhi are far too bitter to be consumed in a soup.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Medical uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>A 2015 Cochrane database review found insufficient evidence to justify the use of G. lucidum as a first-line cancer treatment. It suggests that G. lucidum may have "benefit as an alternative adjunct to conventional treatment in consideration of its potential of enhancing tumour response and stimulating host immunity".[52] Existing studies do not support the use of G. lucidum for treatment of risk factors of cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Habitat</span></strong></p> <p><span>Ganoderma lucidum, and its close relative Ganoderma tsugae, grow in the northern Eastern Hemlock forests. These two species of bracket fungus have a worldwide distribution in both tropical and temperate geographical regions, growing as a parasite or saprotroph on a wide variety of trees.[9] Similar species of Ganoderma have been found growing in the Amazon.[26] In nature, lingzhi grows at the base and stumps of deciduous trees, especially maple.[27] Only two or three out of 10,000 such aged trees will have lingzhi growth, and therefore its wild form is extremely rare. Today, lingzhi is effectively cultivated on hardwood logs or sawdust/woodchips.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>The Chinese classics first used zhi during the Warring States period (475–221 BCE) and lingzhi during the Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE).[citation needed]</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><span>The word zhi 芝 occurs approximately 100 times in classical texts.[29] Occurrences in early Chinese histories, such as the (91 BCE) Shiji "Records of the Grand Historian" and (82 CE) Hanshu "Book of Han", predominantly refer to the "Mushroom of Immortality; elixir of life". They record that fangshi "masters of esoterica; alchemists; magicians", supposedly followers of Zou Yan (305–240 BCE), claimed to know secret locations like Mount Penglai where the magic zhi mushroom grew. Some sinologists propose that the mythical zhi 芝 derived from Indian legends about soma that reached China around the 3rd century BCE.[30] Fangshi courtiers convinced Qin and Han emperors, most notably Qin Shi Huang (r. 221–210 BCE) and Emperor Wu of Han (r. 141–87 BCE), to dispatch large expeditions (e.g., Xu Fu in 219 BCE) seeking the zhi Plant of Immortality, but none produced tangible results. Zhi occurrences in other classical texts often refer to an edible fungus. The Liji "Record of Ritual" lists zhi "lichens" as a type of condiment.[31] The Chuci "Song of the South" metaphorically mentions, "The holy herb is weeded out".[32] The Huainanzi "Philosophers of Huainan" records a zizhi 紫芝 "Purple Mushroom" Aphorism, "The zhi fungus grows on mountains, but it cannot grow on barren boulders."</span></p> <p><span>The word lingzhi 靈芝 was first recorded in a fu 賦 "rhapsody; prose-poem" by the Han dynasty polymath Zhang Heng (CE 78–139). His Xijing fu 西京賦 "Western Metropolis Rhapsody" description of Emperor Wu of Han's (104 BCE) Jianzhang Palace parallels lingzhi with shijun 石菌 "rock mushroom": "Raising huge breakers, lifting waves, That drenched the stone mushrooms on the high bank, And soaked the magic fungus on vermeil boughs."[34] The commentary by Xue Zong (d. 237) notes these fungi were eaten as drugs of immortality.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><span>The (ca. 1st–2nd century CE) Shennong bencao jing "Divine Farmer's Classic of Pharmaceutics" classifies zhi into six color categories, each of which is believed to benefit the qi "Life Force" in a different part of the body: qingzhi 青芝 "Green Mushroom" for Liver, chizhi 赤芝 "Red Mushroom" for heart, huangzhi 黃芝 "Yellow Mushroom" for spleen, baizhi 白芝 "White Mushroom" for Lung, heizhi "Black Mushroom" 黑芝 for kidney, and zizhi 紫芝 "Purple Mushroom" for Essence. Commentators identify this red chizhi (or danzhi 丹芝 "cinnabar mushroom") as the lingzhi.</span></p> <p><span>Chi Zhi (Ganoderma rubra) is bitter and balanced. It mainly treats binding in the chest, boosts the heart qi, supplements the center, sharpens the wits, and [causes people] not to forget [i.e., improves the memory]. Protracted taking may make the body light, prevent senility, and prolong life so as to make one an immortal. Its other name is Dan Zhi (Cinnabar Ganoderma). It grows in mountains and valleys.[35][36]</span></p> <p><span>While Chinese texts have recorded medicinal uses of lingzhi for more than 2,000 years, a few sources erroneously claim more than 4,000 years.[37] Modern scholarship accepts neither the historicity of Shennong "Divine Farmer" (legendary inventor of agriculture, traditionally r. 2737–2697 BCE) nor that he wrote the Shennong bencao jing[citation needed].</span></p> <p><span>The (ca. 320 CE) Baopuzi, written by the Jin Dynasty Daoist scholar Ge Hong, has the first classical discussion of Zhi.[38] Based upon no-longer extant texts, Ge distinguishes five categories of zhi, each with 120 varieties: Shizhi 石芝 "stone Zhi", Muzhi 木芝 "wood Zhi", Caozhi 草芝 "Plant Zhi", Rouzhi 肉芝 "flesh zhi", and junzhi 菌芝 "mushroom zhi. For example, the "mushroom zhi".</span></p> <p><span>Tiny excresences. These grow deep in the mountains, at the base of large trees or beside springs. They may resemble buildings, palanquins and horses, dragon and tigers, human beings, or flying birds. They may be any of the five colors. They too number 120 for which there exist illustrations. All are to be sought and gathered while using Yu's Pace, and they are to be cut with a bone knife. When dried in the shade, powdered, and taken by the inch-square spoonful, they produce geniehood. Those of the intermediate class confer several thousands of years, and those of the lowest type a thousand years of life</span></p> <p><strong><span>Taxonomy and naming</span></strong></p> <p><span>Names for the lingzhi fungus have a two thousand-year history. The Chinese term lingzhi 靈芝 was first recorded during the Han dynasty (206 BC – 9 AD). Petter Adolf Karsten named the genus Ganoderma in 1881.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Botanical names</span></strong></p> <p><span>The fungus was given its first binomial name, Boletus lucidus, by English botanist William Curtis in 1781. The lingzhi's botanical names have Greek and Latin roots. The generic name Ganoderma derives from the Greek ganos γανος "brightness; sheen", hence "shining" and derma δερμα "skin".</span></p> <p><span>The specific epithet lucidum is Latin for "shining". Tsugae is derived from the Japanese word for "hemlock" (tsuga 栂).</span></p> <p><span>There are multiple species of lingzhi, scientifically known to be within the Ganoderma lucidum species complex and mycologists are researching the differences among species within this complex.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Chinese names</span></strong></p> <p><span>In the Chinese language, lingzhi is made up of the compounds ling 灵 "spirit, spiritual; soul; miraculous; sacred; divine; mysterious; efficacious; effective" (cf. Lingyan Temple) and zhi 芝 "(traditional) plant of longevity; fungus; seed; branch; mushroom; excrescence". Fabrizio Pregadio notes, "The term zhi, which has no equivalent in Western languages, refers to a variety of supermundane substances often described as plants, fungi, or "excresences"."[6] Zhi occurs in other Chinese plant names such as zhima 芝麻 "sesame" or "seed", and was anciently used a phonetic loan character for zhi 芷 "Angelica iris". Chinese differentiates Ganoderma species between chizhi 赤芝 "red mushroom" G. lucidum and zizhi 紫芝 "purple mushroom" G. japonicum.</span></p> <p><span>Lingzhi has several synonyms. ruicao 瑞草 "auspicious plant" (with rui 瑞 "auspicious; felicitous omen" and the suffix cao "plant; herb") is the oldest; the (c. 3rd century BCE) Erya dictionary defines qiu </span><span>苬</span><span> (interpreted as a miscopy of jun 菌 "mushroom") as zhi 芝 "mushroom" and the commentary of Guo Pu (276–324) says, "The [zhi] flowers three times in one year. It is a [ruicao] felicitous plant."[7] Other Chinese names for Ganoderma include ruizhi 瑞芝 "auspicious mushroom", shenzhi 神芝 "divine mushroom" (with shen "spirit; god' supernatural; divine"), mulingzhi 木灵芝 (with "tree; wood"), xiancao 仙草 "immortality plant" (with xian "(Daoism) transcendent; immortal; wizard"), and lingzhicao 灵芝草 or zhicao 芝草 "mushroom plant".</span></p> <p><span>Since both Chinese ling and zhi have multiple meanings, lingzhi has diverse English translations. Renditions include "[zhi] possessed of soul power",[8] "Herb of Spiritual Potency" or "Mushroom of Immortality",[9] "Numinous Mushroom",[10] "divine mushroom",[11] "divine fungus",[12] "Magic Fungus",[13] and "Marvelous Fungus".</span></p> <p><strong><span>Japanese names</span></strong></p> <p><span>Japanese language Reishi 霊芝 is a Sino-Japanese loan word from lingzhi. This modern Japanese kanji 霊 is the shinjitai "new character form" for the kyūjitai "old character form" 靈.</span></p> <p><span>Reishi synonyms divide between Sino-Japanese borrowings and native Japanese coinages. Sinitic loanwords include literary terms such as zuisō 瑞草 (from ruicao) "auspicious plant" and sensō 仙草 (from xiaocao) "immortality plant". A common native Japanese name is mannentake 万年茸 "10,000 year mushroom". The Japanese writing system uses shi or shiba 芝 for "grass; lawn; turf" and take or kinoko 茸 for "mushroom" (e.g., shiitake). Other Japanese terms for reishi include kadodetake 門出茸 "departure mushroom", hijiridake 聖茸 "sage mushroom", and magoshakushi 孫杓子 "grandchild ladle".</span></p> <p><strong><span>English names</span></strong></p> <p><span>English lingzhi or ling chih (sometimes spelled "ling chi" from French EFEO Chinese transcription) is a Chinese loanword. The Oxford English Dictionary gives Chinese "líng divine + zhī fungus" as the origin of ling chih or lingzhi, and defines, "The fungus Ganoderma lucidum, believed in China to confer longevity and used as a symbol of this on Chinese ceramic ware."[15] The OED notes the earliest recorded usage of the Wade–Giles romanization ling chih in 1904,[16] and of the Pinyin lingzhi in 1980. In addition to the transliterated loanword, English names include "glossy ganoderma" and "shiny polyporus".</span></p>
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Become our seed supplier</strong></h2> <h2><strong>What does it take to become our seed supplier?</strong></h2> <p>In order to become our supplier, you need to have a video and pictures of the fruits of the plants you offer us, with your personal details and a date on paper that will be clearly visible (with your name and email address you use for PayPal).</p> <p>If it is a vegetable (tomato, pepper, cucumber ...) you need to know the exact name of the variety, because if you use any other name and we cannot find the information on the internet, then we are not interested in those seeds.</p> <p>You will need to send us a smaller amount of seed (20) so that we can perform seed germination testing. After that, we can arrange a further purchase of the seed from you.</p> <p>We make payments exclusively through PayPal (there is no other payment option).</p> </body> </html>
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