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Tomato Seeds Novosadski Jabucar

300 Seeds Novosadski...

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<h2><strong>Novosadski Jabucar Tomato 450 Seeds&nbsp;</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 300 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <div>70-80 days, Medium early variety, Indeterminate.&nbsp;The fruits are round, smooth, bright red, average weight is 130-150 g.&nbsp;He has a good ratio of total sugar and acid, with a dry matter content of 6 to 6.5% and a very good taste. It can be grown from seeds, and without support.</div> <div>History:</div> <div>Old tested variety&nbsp;from Serbia. 'Jabucar' means 'Apple' in Serbian.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 197 (1g)
Tomato Seeds Novosadski Jabucar
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Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus) 2.25 - 1

Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus)

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<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 class=""><strong>Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1235 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <p>Amaranthus, collectively known as amaranth, is a cosmopolitan genus of annual or short-lived perennial plants. Some amaranth species are cultivated as leaf vegetables, cereals, and ornamental plants. Most of the species from Amaranthus are summer annual weeds and are commonly referred to as pigweed. Catkin-like cymes of densely packed flowers grow in summer or autumn.</p> <p>Approximately 60 species are recognized, with inflorescences and foliage ranging from purple and red to green or gold. Members of this genus share many characteristics and uses with members of the closely related genus Celosia.</p> <p>"Amaranth" derives from Greek ἀμάραντος (amarantos), "unfading," with the Greek word for "flower," ἄνθος (anthos), factoring into the word's development as "amaranth." The more accurate "amarant" is an archaic variant.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>Amaranthus shows a wide variety of morphological diversity among and even within certain species. Although the family (Amaranthaceae) is distinctive, the genus has few distinguishing characters among the 70 species included. This complicates taxonomy and Amaranthus has generally been considered among systematists as a "difficult" genus.</p> <p>Formerly, Sauer (1955) classified the genus into two subgenera, differentiating only between monoecious and dioecious species: Acnida (L.) Aellen ex K.R. Robertson and Amaranthus.</p> <p>Although this classification was widely accepted, further infrageneric classification was (and still is) needed to differentiate this widely diverse group.</p> <p>Currently, Amaranthus includes three recognized subgenera and 70 species, although species numbers are questionable due to hybridization and species concepts. Infrageneric classification focuses on inflorescence, flower characters and whether a species is monoecious/dioecious, as in the Sauer (1955) suggested classification. A modified infrageneric classification of Amaranthus was published by Mosyakin &amp; Robertson (1996) and includes three subgenera: Acnida, Amaranthus, and Albersia. The taxonomy is further differentiated by sections within each of the subgenera.</p> <p><strong><em>Human uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Known to the Aztecs as huauhtli, it is thought to have represented up to 80% of their caloric consumption before the conquest. Another important use of amaranth throughout Mesoamerica was to prepare ritual drinks and foods. To this day, amaranth grains are toasted much like popcorn and mixed with honey, molasses or chocolate to make a treat called alegría, meaning "joy" in Spanish. Diego Duran described the festivities for Huitzilopochtli, whose name means "hummingbird of the left side" or "left-handed hummingbird". (Real hummingbirds feed on amaranth flowers.) The Aztec month of Panquetzaliztli (7 December to 26 December) was dedicated to Huitzilopochtli. People decorated their homes and trees with paper flags; there were ritual races, processions, dances, songs, prayers, and finally human sacrifices. This was one of the more important Aztec festivals, and the people prepared for the whole month. They fasted or ate very little; a statue of the god was made out of amaranth (huautli) seeds and honey, and at the end of the month, it was cut into small pieces so everybody could eat a little piece of the god. After the Spanish conquest, cultivation of amaranth was outlawed, while some of the festivities were subsumed into the Christmas celebration.</p> <p>Because of its importance as a symbol of indigenous culture, its gluten-free palatability, ease of cooking, and a protein that is particularly well-suited to human nutritional needs, interest in grain amaranth (especially A. cruentus and A. hypochondriacus) revived in the 1970s. It was recovered in Mexico from wild varieties and is now commercially cultivated. It is a popular snack sold in Mexico, sometimes mixed with chocolate or puffed rice, and its use has spread to Europe and parts of North America. Amaranth and quinoa are non-grasses and are called pseudocereals because of their flavor and cooking similarities to cereals.</p> <p><strong>Amaranth seed</strong></p> <p>Several species are raised for amaranth "grain" in Asia and the Americas.</p> <p>Ancient amaranth grains still used to this day include the three species, Amaranthus caudatus, Amaranthus cruentus, and Amaranthus hypochondriacus.[10] Although amaranth was cultivated on a large scale in ancient Mexico, Guatemala, and Peru, nowadays it is only cultivated on a small scale there, along with India, China, Nepal, and other tropical countries; thus, there is potential for further cultivation in those countries, as well as in the U.S. In a 1977 article in Science, amaranth was described as "the crop of the future." It has been proposed as an inexpensive native crop that could be cultivated by indigenous people in rural areas for several reasons:</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It is easily harvested.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Its seeds are a good source of protein. Compared to grains, amaranth is unusually rich in the essential amino acid lysine. Common grains such as wheat and corn are comparatively rich in amino acids that amaranth lacks; thus, amaranth and grains can complement each other.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The seeds of Amaranthus species contain about thirty percent more protein than cereals like rice, sorghum and rye. In cooked and edible forms, amaranth is competitive with wheat germ and oats - higher in some nutrients, lower in others.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It is easy to cook.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; As befits its weedy life history, amaranth grains grow very rapidly and their large seedheads can weigh up to 1 kilogram and contain a half-million seeds in three species of amaranth.</p> <p><strong>Amaranth seed flour</strong></p> <p>Amaranth seed flour has been evaluated as an additive to wheat flour by food specialists. To determine palatability, different levels of amaranth grain flour were mixed with the wheat flour and baking ingredients (1% salt, 2.5% fat, 1.5% yeast, 10% sugar and 52–74% water), fermented, molded, pan-proofed and baked. The baked products were evaluated for loaf volume, moisture content, color, odor, taste and texture. The amaranth containing products were then compared with bread made from 100% wheat flour. The loaf volume decreased by 40% and the moisture content increased from 22 to 42% with increase in amaranth grain flour. The study found that the sensory scores of the taste, odor, color, and texture decreased with increasing amounts of amaranth. Generally, above 15% amaranth grain flour, there were significant differences in the evaluated sensory qualities and the high amaranth-containing product was found to be of unacceptable palatability to the population sample that evaluated the baked products.</p> <p><strong>Leaves, roots, and stems</strong></p> <p>Amaranth species are cultivated and consumed as a leaf vegetable in many parts of the world. There are four species of Amaranthus documented as cultivated vegetables in eastern Asia: Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus blitum, Amaranthus dubius, and Amaranthus tricolor.</p> <p>In Indonesia and Malaysia, leaf amaranth is called bayam. In the Philippines, the Ilocano word for the plant is "kalunay"; the Tagalog word for the plant is kilitis or "kulitis". In the state of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in India, it is called Chaulai and is a popular green leafy vegetable (referred to in the class of vegetable preparations called saag). It is called Chua in Kumaun area of Uttarakhand, where it is a popular red-green vegetable. In Karnataka state in India, it is called Harive (ಹರಿವೆ). It is used to prepare curries like Hulee, palya, Majjigay-hulee and so on. In the state of Kerala, it is called 'Cheera' and is consumed by stir-frying the leaves with spices and red chillies to make 'Cheera Thoran'. In Tamil Nadu State, it is called முளைக்கீரை and is regularly consumed as a favourite dish, where the greens are steamed, and mashed, with light seasoning of salt, red chillis and cumin. It is called keerai masial (கீரை மசியல்). In Andhra Pradesh this leaf is added in preparation of a popular dal called thotakura pappu తొట కూర పప్పు (Telugu). In Maharashtra, it is called "Shravani Maath" (literally माठ grown in month of Shravan) and it is available in both red and white colour. In Orissa, it is called "Khada saga", it is used to prepare 'Saga Bhaja', in which the leaf is fried with chillies and onions.</p> <p>The root of mature amaranth is a popular vegetable. It is white and cooked with tomatoes or tamarind gravy. It has a milky taste and is alkaline.</p> <p>In China, the leaves and stems are used as a stir-fry vegetable, or in soups, and called 苋菜 (Mandarin Pinyin: xiàncài; Cantonese Jyutping: jin6 coi3) with variations in various dialects). Amaranth greens are believed to help enhance eyesight.[citation needed] In Vietnam, it is called rau dền and is used to make soup. There are two species popular as edible vegetable in Vietnam: dền đỏ- amaranthus tricolor and dền cơm or dền trắng- amaranthus viridis.</p> <p>A traditional food plant in Africa, amaranth has the potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable land care.[19] In East Africa, amaranth leaf is known in chewa as bonongwe, and in Swahili as mchicha, as terere in Kikuyu, Meru and Embu; and as telele in Kamba. In Bantu regions of Uganda it is known as doodo.[20] It is recommended by some doctors for people having low red blood cell count. It is also known among the Kalenjin as a drought crop (chepkerta). In Lingala (spoken in the Congo), it is known as lɛngalɛnga or bítɛkutɛku.[21] In Nigeria, it is a common vegetable and goes with all Nigerian starch dishes. It is known in Yoruba as Shoko a short form of Shokoyokoto (meaning make the husband fat) or arowo jeja (meaning "we have money left over for fish"). In the Caribbean, the leaves are called bhaji in Trinidad and callaloo in Jamaica, and are sautéed with onions, garlic and tomatoes, or sometimes used in a soup called pepperpot soup.</p> <p>In Greece, green amaranth (Amaranthus viridis) is a popular dish and is called βλήτα, vlita or vleeta. It is boiled, then served with olive oil and lemon juice like a salad, sometimes alongside fried fish. Greeks stop harvesting the plant (which also grows wild) when it starts to bloom at the end of August.</p> <p>In Sri Lanka, it is called "koora thampala". Sri Lankans cook it and eat it with rice. Fiji Indians call it choraiya bhaji.</p> <p><strong>Dyes</strong></p> <p>The flowers of the 'Hopi Red Dye' amaranth were used by the Hopi (a tribe in the western United States) as the source of a deep red dye. There is also a synthetic dye that has been named "amaranth" for its similarity in color to the natural amaranth pigments known as betalains. This synthetic dye is also known as Red No. 2 in North America and E123 in the European Union.</p> <p><strong>Ornamentals</strong></p> <p>The genus also contains several well-known ornamental plants, such as Amaranthus caudatus (love-lies-bleeding), a native of India and a vigorous, hardy annual with dark purplish flowers crowded in handsome drooping spikes. Another Indian annual, A. hypochondriacus (prince's feather), has deeply veined lance-shaped leaves, purple on the under face, and deep crimson flowers densely packed on erect spikes.</p> <p>Amaranths are recorded as food plants for some Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) species including the nutmeg moth and various case-bearer moths of the genus Coleophora: C. amaranthella, C. enchorda (feeds exclusively on Amaranthus), C. immortalis (feeds exclusively on Amaranthus), C. lineapulvella and C. versurella (recorded on A. spinosus).</p> <p><strong>Nutritional value</strong></p> <p>Amaranth greens are a common leaf vegetable throughout the tropics and in many warm temperate regions. See Callaloo</p> <p>Cooked amaranth leaves are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and folate; they are also a complementing source of other vitamins such as thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin, plus some dietary minerals including calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, copper, and manganese. Cooked amaranth grains are a complementing source of thiamine, niacin, riboflavin, and folate, and dietary minerals including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and manganese - comparable to common grains such as wheat germ, oats and others.</p> <p>Amaranth seeds contain lysine, an essential amino acid, limited in grains or other plant sources.</p> <p>&nbsp;Most fruits and vegetables do not contain a complete set of amino acids, and thus different sources of protein must be used. Amaranth too is limited in some essential amino acids, such as leucine and threonine. Amaranth seeds are therefore a promising complement to common grains such as wheat germ, oats, and corn because these common grains are abundant sources of essential amino acids found to be limited in amaranth.</p> <p>Amaranth may be a promising source of protein to those who are gluten sensitive, because unlike the protein found in grains such as wheat and rye, its protein does not contain gluten. According to a 2007 report, amaranth compares well in nutrient content with gluten-free vegetarian options such as buckwheat, corn, millet, wild rice, oats and quinoa.</p> <p>Several studies have shown that like oats, amaranth seed or oil may be of benefit for those with hypertension and cardiovascular disease; regular consumption reduces blood pressure and cholesterol levels, while improving antioxidant status and some immune parameters.</p> <p>While the active ingredient in oats appears to be water-soluble fiber, amaranth appears to lower cholesterol via its content of plant stanols and squalene.</p> <p>Amaranth remains an active area of scientific research for both human nutritional needs and foraging applications. Over 100 scientific studies suggest a somewhat conflicting picture on possible anti-nutritional and toxic factors in amaranth, more so in some particular strains of amaranth. Lehmann, in a review article, identifies some of these reported anti-nutritional factors in amaranth to be phenolics, saponins, tannins, phytic acid, oxalates, protease inhibitors, nitrates, polyphenols and phytohemagglutinins. Of these, oxalates and nitrates are of more concern when amaranth grain is used in foraging applications. Some studies suggest thermal processing of amaranth, particularly in moist environment, prior to its preparation in food and human consumption may be a promising way to reduce the adverse effects of amaranth's anti-nutritional and toxic factors.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Amaranth weed species have an extended period of germination, rapid growth, and high rates of seed production, and have been causing problems for farmers since the mid-1990s. This is partially due to the reduction in tillage, reduction in herbicidal use and the evolution of herbicidal resistance in several species where herbicides have been applied more often.[35] The following 9 species of Amaranthus are considered invasive and noxious weeds in the U.S and Canada: A. albus, A. blitoides, A. hybridus, A. palmeri, A. powellii, A. retroflexus, A. spinosus, A. tuberculatus, and A. viridis.</p> <p>A new herbicide-resistant strain of Amaranthus palmeri has appeared; it is glyphosate-resistant and so cannot be killed by herbicides using the chemical. Also, this plant can survive in tough conditions.This could be of particular concern to cotton farmers using glyphosate-resistant cotton. The species Amaranthus palmeri (Palmer amaranth) causes the greatest reduction in soybean yields and has the potential to reduce yields by 17-68% in field experiments. Palmer amaranth is among the "top five most troublesome weeds" in the southeast of the United States and has already evolved resistances to dinitroaniline herbicides and acetolactate synthase inhibitors. This makes the proper identification of Amaranthus species at the seedling stage essential for agriculturalists. Proper weed control needs to be applied before the species successfully colonizes in the crop field and causes significant yield reductions.</p> <p><strong>Seed saving</strong></p> <p>There are a multitude of varieties which cross with one another very easily. Some species have been found to cross with one another e.g. Amaranthus caudatus and Amaranthus hypochondriacus. For most types, flowering occurs as the days become shorter.</p> <p>Being wind-pollinated, they will cross with one another if less than 400 metres apart at flowering time. If the seed is to be used for planting, roguing is necessary to remove inferior individuals before they can flower and pollinate better plants.</p> <p>The seed heads mature gradually from bottom to top, requiring harvesters to be selective when choosing plants for seed harvesting. Seed harvest is maximized by shaking the near-mature seed heads into a paper bag or onto a canvas. In large growing areas the heads are cut all at once when most of the seeds are ripe. Once the heads have fully ripened, they tend to drop their seeds, so harvesting is done just before this point.</p> <p>Heads are then dried for a week and threshed with gloved hands or feet on canvas as the chaff is somewhat prickly. Care is required not to lose the seeds when winnowing because the chaff and seeds are of similar size and the seeds are of a light weight. Heaping uncleaned seeds in a bowl and tossing them will concentrate the light debris on the top, and it can then blow away. The process is repeated until only seeds remain.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 77 W (1g)
Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus) 2.25 - 1
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Bean Seeds 'Marvel of Venice' 1.85 - 1

Bean Seeds Marvel of Venice

Regular price €1.25 -9% Price €1.14
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<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Bean Seeds 'Marvel of Venice' (Phaseolus vulgaris)<br /></strong></em></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <div><span>The Marvel of Venice bean is produced on a large climbing vine that creates long slender bean pods. The outer skin of the Marvel of Venice bean ranges from a light to honey yellow color and can be from seven to ten inches in length. Inside it contains petite beans which depending upon variety can be black or white in color. When young the bean pod is edible in its entirety and offers a sweet bean flavor and tender yet meaty texture. Look for fresh beans whose pods are firm and unblemished, beans should be crisp and snap when you break off the tip of the pod. </span><br /><h2>Seasons/Availability</h2> <span>Marvel of Venice beans are available in the summer and early fall months. </span><br /><h2>Current Facts</h2> <span>The Marvel of Venice bean, botanically known as part of Phaseolus vulgaris, is a romano type bean and a pole variety that grows in a vining fashion. Romano beans are also further categorized as a European snap bean type and are thought to be a predecessor of the modern snap bean. An heirloom, Italian bean the Marvel of Venice bean is sought after for its superior fresh bean flavor which is rich and buttery. Romano type beans such as Marvel of Venice are unique among other beans and are recognizable by their meaty texture and flattened shape. </span><br /><h2>Nutritional Value</h2> <span>Marvel of Venice beans contain a significant amount of vitamin C and also offer some protein, vitamin A, calcium, iron and fiber. </span><br /><h2>Applications</h2> <span>Marvel of Venice beans can be used whole when fresh in both raw and cooked preparations. Additionally, bean pods can be left on the vine to fully mature and dry out then the inner beans removed and utilized as a dried or shelling bean. Marvel of Venice beans can be braised, steamed, simmered, grilled, deep-fried and sautéed. Add lightly cooked or raw beans to salads or serve alongside dips as a crudité. The beans offer a meaty texture when cooked and can stand up to prolonged cooking preparations making them an excellent addition to stews, soups or served braised as a side dish. Their flavor pairs well with tomatoes, garlic, shallots, fennel, lemon, dried red chile, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, fresh herbs, butter, pancetta, hazlenuts, pecorino and parmasean cheese. Beans will keep best if stored in a plastic bag, refrigerated and used within five to seven days. </span><br /><h2>Ethnic/Cultural Info</h2> <span>Also known as Meraviglia di Venezia in its native Italy the Marvel of Venice is classically used there in the tomato sauce based dish, fagiolini al’uccelletto. Romano type beans such as Marvel of Venice are the preferred bean of Italian cuisine and appear in many summer and fall preparations. The Marvel of Venice bean’s popularity extends to France and Spain as well as to Austria and Germany where it is sold under the name Rheingold. </span><br /><h2>Geography/History</h2> <span>Marvel of Venice beans are an heirloom romano variety bean believed to be native to Italy. Romano type beans are native to southern Europe and are known to be the snap bean of Europe. Be sure to provide adequate support when planting as the Marvel of Venice bean pods grow on vigorous vines that can climb up to seven feet of support trellis or poles. The white seeded variety is known to produce beans earlier in the season than the black seeded type. Like most beans they are not frost tolerant and prefer warm growing conditions with soil temperatures above sixty degrees. Plants can provide significant yields in ideal growing conditions and beans should be harvested frequently to prolong production. </span></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>GROWING TIP:</strong> All beans and peas are legumes and benefit from "inoculating" with rhizobacteria. These bacteria do the work of taking gaseous nitrogen from the air and "fixing" or concentrating it in pink root nodules which then slough off, adding nitrogen to the soil in a form other plants can take up as a nutrient. Inoculating your beans and peas will increase germination, and the health of your plants, helping them growing large roots and thus healthier plants. Growing pole beans with corn provides an extra shot of nitrogen to the corn, a wonderful natural symbiotic relationship that the Native Americans understood very well. You will see a big difference in overall results. Healthy legumes should also be turned under the soil when production ends as they are excellent green manure for your next crops.</div> </div> </div>
VE 169 (3,5g)
Bean Seeds 'Marvel of Venice' 1.85 - 1
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Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed

Berggold Early Dwarf French...

Regular price €1.85 -27% Price €1.35
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<h2><strong>Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean with white seeds.&nbsp; The plant is approximately 2 feet tall grows vigorously and produces yellow, stringless, meaty, straight pods about 11-13 cm long.</p> <p>Berggold is part of the Phaseolus genus and is a Bean variety. Its scientific name is Phaseolus vulgaris 'Berggold'. 'Berggold' is considered an OP (open polliated) cultivar. This variety is a Vegetable that typically grows as an Annual/Perennial, which is defined as a plant that can mature and completes its lifecycle over the course of one year or more.</p> <p class="">Typically, Berggold Bean is normally fairly low maintenance and can thus be quite easy to grow - only a basic level of care is required throughout the year to ensure it thrives. Being aware of the basic growing conditions this plant likes (soil, sun, and water) will result in a strong and vibrant plant.</p>
VE 59 (5g)
Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed
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Black Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus) 2.25 - 5

Black Amaranth Seeds...

Regular price €1.35 -22% Price €1.05
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Black Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus)</strong></h2> <h2 class="rte align_justify"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1.235 seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <p>Amaranthus, collectively known as amaranth, is a cosmopolitan genus of annual or short-lived perennial plants. Some amaranth species are cultivated as leaf vegetables, cereals, and ornamental plants. Most of the species from Amaranthus are summer annual weeds and are commonly referred to as pigweed. Catkin-like cymes of densely packed flowers grow in summer or autumn.</p> <p>Approximately 60 species are recognized, with inflorescences and foliage ranging from purple and red to green or gold. Members of this genus share many characteristics and uses with members of the closely related genus Celosia.</p> <p>"Amaranth" derives from Greek ἀμάραντος (amarantos), "unfading," with the Greek word for "flower," ἄνθος (anthos), factoring into the word's development as "amaranth." The more accurate "amarant" is an archaic variant.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>Amaranthus shows a wide variety of morphological diversity among and even within certain species. Although the family (Amaranthaceae) is distinctive, the genus has few distinguishing characters among the 70 species included. This complicates taxonomy and Amaranthus has generally been considered among systematists as a "difficult" genus.</p> <p>Formerly, Sauer (1955) classified the genus into two subgenera, differentiating only between monoecious and dioecious species: Acnida (L.) Aellen ex K.R. Robertson and Amaranthus.</p> <p>Although this classification was widely accepted, further infrageneric classification was (and still is) needed to differentiate this widely diverse group.</p> <p>Currently, Amaranthus includes three recognized subgenera and 70 species, although species numbers are questionable due to hybridization and species concepts. Infrageneric classification focuses on inflorescence, flower characters and whether a species is monoecious/dioecious, as in the Sauer (1955) suggested classification. A modified infrageneric classification of Amaranthus was published by Mosyakin &amp; Robertson (1996) and includes three subgenera: Acnida, Amaranthus, and Albersia. The taxonomy is further differentiated by sections within each of the subgenera.</p> <p><strong><em>Human uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Known to the Aztecs as huauhtli, it is thought to have represented up to 80% of their caloric consumption before the conquest. Another important use of amaranth throughout Mesoamerica was to prepare ritual drinks and foods. To this day, amaranth grains are toasted much like popcorn and mixed with honey, molasses or chocolate to make a treat called alegría, meaning "joy" in Spanish. Diego Duran described the festivities for Huitzilopochtli, whose name means "hummingbird of the left side" or "left-handed hummingbird". (Real hummingbirds feed on amaranth flowers.) The Aztec month of Panquetzaliztli (7 December to 26 December) was dedicated to Huitzilopochtli. People decorated their homes and trees with paper flags; there were ritual races, processions, dances, songs, prayers, and finally human sacrifices. This was one of the more important Aztec festivals, and the people prepared for the whole month. They fasted or ate very little; a statue of the god was made out of amaranth (huautli) seeds and honey, and at the end of the month, it was cut into small pieces so everybody could eat a little piece of the god. After the Spanish conquest, cultivation of amaranth was outlawed, while some of the festivities were subsumed into the Christmas celebration.</p> <p>Because of its importance as a symbol of indigenous culture, its gluten-free palatability, ease of cooking, and a protein that is particularly well-suited to human nutritional needs, interest in grain amaranth (especially A. cruentus and A. hypochondriacus) revived in the 1970s. It was recovered in Mexico from wild varieties and is now commercially cultivated. It is a popular snack sold in Mexico, sometimes mixed with chocolate or puffed rice, and its use has spread to Europe and parts of North America. Amaranth and quinoa are non-grasses and are called pseudocereals because of their flavor and cooking similarities to cereals.</p> <p><strong>Amaranth seed</strong></p> <p>Several species are raised for amaranth "grain" in Asia and the Americas.</p> <p>Ancient amaranth grains still used to this day include the three species, Amaranthus caudatus, Amaranthus cruentus, and Amaranthus hypochondriacus.[10] Although amaranth was cultivated on a large scale in ancient Mexico, Guatemala, and Peru, nowadays it is only cultivated on a small scale there, along with India, China, Nepal, and other tropical countries; thus, there is potential for further cultivation in those countries, as well as in the U.S. In a 1977 article in Science, amaranth was described as "the crop of the future." It has been proposed as an inexpensive native crop that could be cultivated by indigenous people in rural areas for several reasons:</p> <p>    It is easily harvested.</p> <p>    Its seeds are a good source of protein. Compared to grains, amaranth is unusually rich in the essential amino acid lysine. Common grains such as wheat and corn are comparatively rich in amino acids that amaranth lacks; thus, amaranth and grains can complement each other.</p> <p>    The seeds of Amaranthus species contain about thirty percent more protein than cereals like rice, sorghum and rye. In cooked and edible forms, amaranth is competitive with wheat germ and oats - higher in some nutrients, lower in others.</p> <p>    It is easy to cook.</p> <p>    As befits its weedy life history, amaranth grains grow very rapidly and their large seedheads can weigh up to 1 kilogram and contain a half-million seeds in three species of amaranth.</p> <p><strong>Amaranth seed flour</strong></p> <p>Amaranth seed flour has been evaluated as an additive to wheat flour by food specialists. To determine palatability, different levels of amaranth grain flour were mixed with the wheat flour and baking ingredients (1% salt, 2.5% fat, 1.5% yeast, 10% sugar and 52–74% water), fermented, molded, pan-proofed and baked. The baked products were evaluated for loaf volume, moisture content, color, odor, taste and texture. The amaranth containing products were then compared with bread made from 100% wheat flour. The loaf volume decreased by 40% and the moisture content increased from 22 to 42% with increase in amaranth grain flour. The study found that the sensory scores of the taste, odor, color, and texture decreased with increasing amounts of amaranth. Generally, above 15% amaranth grain flour, there were significant differences in the evaluated sensory qualities and the high amaranth-containing product was found to be of unacceptable palatability to the population sample that evaluated the baked products.</p> <p><strong>Leaves, roots, and stems</strong></p> <p>Amaranth species are cultivated and consumed as a leaf vegetable in many parts of the world. There are four species of Amaranthus documented as cultivated vegetables in eastern Asia: Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus blitum, Amaranthus dubius, and Amaranthus tricolor.</p> <p>In Indonesia and Malaysia, leaf amaranth is called bayam. In the Philippines, the Ilocano word for the plant is "kalunay"; the Tagalog word for the plant is kilitis or "kulitis". In the state of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in India, it is called Chaulai and is a popular green leafy vegetable (referred to in the class of vegetable preparations called saag). It is called Chua in Kumaun area of Uttarakhand, where it is a popular red-green vegetable. In Karnataka state in India, it is called Harive (ಹರಿವೆ). It is used to prepare curries like Hulee, palya, Majjigay-hulee and so on. In the state of Kerala, it is called 'Cheera' and is consumed by stir-frying the leaves with spices and red chillies to make 'Cheera Thoran'. In Tamil Nadu State, it is called முளைக்கீரை and is regularly consumed as a favourite dish, where the greens are steamed, and mashed, with light seasoning of salt, red chillis and cumin. It is called keerai masial (கீரை மசியல்). In Andhra Pradesh this leaf is added in preparation of a popular dal called thotakura pappu తొట కూర పప్పు (Telugu). In Maharashtra, it is called "Shravani Maath" (literally माठ grown in month of Shravan) and it is available in both red and white colour. In Orissa, it is called "Khada saga", it is used to prepare 'Saga Bhaja', in which the leaf is fried with chillies and onions.</p> <p>The root of mature amaranth is a popular vegetable. It is white and cooked with tomatoes or tamarind gravy. It has a milky taste and is alkaline.</p> <p>In China, the leaves and stems are used as a stir-fry vegetable, or in soups, and called 苋菜 (Mandarin Pinyin: xiàncài; Cantonese Jyutping: jin6 coi3) with variations in various dialects). Amaranth greens are believed to help enhance eyesight.[citation needed] In Vietnam, it is called rau dền and is used to make soup. There are two species popular as edible vegetable in Vietnam: dền đỏ- amaranthus tricolor and dền cơm or dền trắng- amaranthus viridis.</p> <p>A traditional food plant in Africa, amaranth has the potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable land care.[19] In East Africa, amaranth leaf is known in chewa as bonongwe, and in Swahili as mchicha, as terere in Kikuyu, Meru and Embu; and as telele in Kamba. In Bantu regions of Uganda it is known as doodo.[20] It is recommended by some doctors for people having low red blood cell count. It is also known among the Kalenjin as a drought crop (chepkerta). In Lingala (spoken in the Congo), it is known as lɛngalɛnga or bítɛkutɛku.[21] In Nigeria, it is a common vegetable and goes with all Nigerian starch dishes. It is known in Yoruba as Shoko a short form of Shokoyokoto (meaning make the husband fat) or arowo jeja (meaning "we have money left over for fish"). In the Caribbean, the leaves are called bhaji in Trinidad and callaloo in Jamaica, and are sautéed with onions, garlic and tomatoes, or sometimes used in a soup called pepperpot soup.</p> <p>In Greece, green amaranth (Amaranthus viridis) is a popular dish and is called βλήτα, vlita or vleeta. It is boiled, then served with olive oil and lemon juice like a salad, sometimes alongside fried fish. Greeks stop harvesting the plant (which also grows wild) when it starts to bloom at the end of August.</p> <p>In Sri Lanka, it is called "koora thampala". Sri Lankans cook it and eat it with rice. Fiji Indians call it choraiya bhaji.</p> <p><strong>Dyes</strong></p> <p>The flowers of the 'Hopi Red Dye' amaranth were used by the Hopi (a tribe in the western United States) as the source of a deep red dye. There is also a synthetic dye that has been named "amaranth" for its similarity in color to the natural amaranth pigments known as betalains. This synthetic dye is also known as Red No. 2 in North America and E123 in the European Union.</p> <p><strong>Ornamentals</strong></p> <p>The genus also contains several well-known ornamental plants, such as Amaranthus caudatus (love-lies-bleeding), a native of India and a vigorous, hardy annual with dark purplish flowers crowded in handsome drooping spikes. Another Indian annual, A. hypochondriacus (prince's feather), has deeply veined lance-shaped leaves, purple on the under face, and deep crimson flowers densely packed on erect spikes.</p> <p>Amaranths are recorded as food plants for some Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) species including the nutmeg moth and various case-bearer moths of the genus Coleophora: C. amaranthella, C. enchorda (feeds exclusively on Amaranthus), C. immortalis (feeds exclusively on Amaranthus), C. lineapulvella and C. versurella (recorded on A. spinosus).</p> <p><strong>Nutritional value</strong></p> <p>Amaranth greens are a common leaf vegetable throughout the tropics and in many warm temperate regions. See Callaloo</p> <p>Cooked amaranth leaves are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and folate; they are also a complementing source of other vitamins such as thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin, plus some dietary minerals including calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, copper, and manganese. Cooked amaranth grains are a complementing source of thiamine, niacin, riboflavin, and folate, and dietary minerals including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and manganese - comparable to common grains such as wheat germ, oats and others.</p> <p>Amaranth seeds contain lysine, an essential amino acid, limited in grains or other plant sources.</p> <p> Most fruits and vegetables do not contain a complete set of amino acids, and thus different sources of protein must be used. Amaranth too is limited in some essential amino acids, such as leucine and threonine. Amaranth seeds are therefore a promising complement to common grains such as wheat germ, oats, and corn because these common grains are abundant sources of essential amino acids found to be limited in amaranth.</p> <p>Amaranth may be a promising source of protein to those who are gluten sensitive, because unlike the protein found in grains such as wheat and rye, its protein does not contain gluten. According to a 2007 report, amaranth compares well in nutrient content with gluten-free vegetarian options such as buckwheat, corn, millet, wild rice, oats and quinoa.</p> <p>Several studies have shown that like oats, amaranth seed or oil may be of benefit for those with hypertension and cardiovascular disease; regular consumption reduces blood pressure and cholesterol levels, while improving antioxidant status and some immune parameters.</p> <p>While the active ingredient in oats appears to be water-soluble fiber, amaranth appears to lower cholesterol via its content of plant stanols and squalene.</p> <p>Amaranth remains an active area of scientific research for both human nutritional needs and foraging applications. Over 100 scientific studies suggest a somewhat conflicting picture on possible anti-nutritional and toxic factors in amaranth, more so in some particular strains of amaranth. Lehmann, in a review article, identifies some of these reported anti-nutritional factors in amaranth to be phenolics, saponins, tannins, phytic acid, oxalates, protease inhibitors, nitrates, polyphenols and phytohemagglutinins. Of these, oxalates and nitrates are of more concern when amaranth grain is used in foraging applications. Some studies suggest thermal processing of amaranth, particularly in moist environment, prior to its preparation in food and human consumption may be a promising way to reduce the adverse effects of amaranth's anti-nutritional and toxic factors.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Amaranth weed species have an extended period of germination, rapid growth, and high rates of seed production, and have been causing problems for farmers since the mid-1990s. This is partially due to the reduction in tillage, reduction in herbicidal use and the evolution of herbicidal resistance in several species where herbicides have been applied more often.[35] The following 9 species of Amaranthus are considered invasive and noxious weeds in the U.S and Canada: A. albus, A. blitoides, A. hybridus, A. palmeri, A. powellii, A. retroflexus, A. spinosus, A. tuberculatus, and A. viridis.</p> <p>A new herbicide-resistant strain of Amaranthus palmeri has appeared; it is glyphosate-resistant and so cannot be killed by herbicides using the chemical. Also, this plant can survive in tough conditions.This could be of particular concern to cotton farmers using glyphosate-resistant cotton. The species Amaranthus palmeri (Palmer amaranth) causes the greatest reduction in soybean yields and has the potential to reduce yields by 17-68% in field experiments. Palmer amaranth is among the "top five most troublesome weeds" in the southeast of the United States and has already evolved resistances to dinitroaniline herbicides and acetolactate synthase inhibitors. This makes the proper identification of Amaranthus species at the seedling stage essential for agriculturalists. Proper weed control needs to be applied before the species successfully colonizes in the crop field and causes significant yield reductions.</p> <p><strong>Seed saving</strong></p> <p>There are a multitude of varieties which cross with one another very easily. Some species have been found to cross with one another e.g. Amaranthus caudatus and Amaranthus hypochondriacus. For most types, flowering occurs as the days become shorter.</p> <p>Being wind-pollinated, they will cross with one another if less than 400 metres apart at flowering time. If the seed is to be used for planting, roguing is necessary to remove inferior individuals before they can flower and pollinate better plants.</p> <p>The seed heads mature gradually from bottom to top, requiring harvesters to be selective when choosing plants for seed harvesting. Seed harvest is maximized by shaking the near-mature seed heads into a paper bag or onto a canvas. In large growing areas the heads are cut all at once when most of the seeds are ripe. Once the heads have fully ripened, they tend to drop their seeds, so harvesting is done just before this point.</p> <p>Heads are then dried for a week and threshed with gloved hands or feet on canvas as the chaff is somewhat prickly. Care is required not to lose the seeds when winnowing because the chaff and seeds are of similar size and the seeds are of a light weight. Heaping uncleaned seeds in a bowl and tossing them will concentrate the light debris on the top, and it can then blow away. The process is repeated until only seeds remain.</p> </div> </body> </html>
VE 77 B (1g)
Black Amaranth Seeds (Amaranthus) 2.25 - 5
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Bloody Butcher Sweetcorn Seeds 1.95 - 5

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<h2 class=""><strong>Bloody Butcher Sweetcorn Seeds - Heirloom</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for pack of 10 (4g), 50 (21g), 100 (42g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Bloody Butcher is old type corn has been grown in the United States since at least 1845. Plants can grow up to 2,5 meters or more in height producing two to six corncob per plant.&nbsp;</p> <p>Grown mainly as an ornamental now. Bloody Butcher was originally used as sweet corn, for roasting or frying corn when young, ground and used as a corn flour. Its young corns are sweet but become tougher when older.&nbsp;</p> <p>Ready for harvest in around 100 days.&nbsp;</p> <p>Corn enjoys well-drained fertile soil and plenty of water!</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
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Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum esculentum)

Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum...

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<h2><strong>Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum esculentum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 150 (3g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds and as a cover crop. To distinguish it from a related species, Fagopyrum tataricum, it is also known as Japanese buckwheat[2] and silverhull buckwheat.</p> <p>Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat, as it is not a grass. Instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb. Because its seeds are eaten and rich in complex carbohydrates, it is referred to as a pseudocereal. The cultivation of buckwheat grain declined sharply in the 20th century with the adoption of nitrogen fertilizer that increased the productivity of other staples.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The name 'buckwheat' or 'beech wheat' comes from its triangular seeds, which resemble the much larger seeds of the beech nut from the beech tree, and the fact that it is used like wheat. The word may be a translation of Middle Dutch boecweite: boec (Modern Dutch beuk), "beech" (see PIE *bhago-) and weite (Mod. Dut. weit), wheat, or may be a native formation on the same model as the Dutch word.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The wild ancestor of common buckwheat is F. esculentum ssp.ancestrale. F. homotropicum is interfertile with F. esculentum and the wild forms have a common distribution, in Yunnan, a southwestern province of China. The wild ancestor of tartary buckwheat is F. tataricum ssp. potanini.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Common buckwheat was domesticated and first cultivated in inland Southeast Asia, possibly around 6000 BCE, and from there spread to Central Asia and Tibet, and then to the Middle East and Europe. Domestication most likely took place in the western Yunnan region of China.[5] Buckwheat is documented in Europe in Finland by at least 5300 BCE[6] as a first sign of agriculture, and in the Balkans by circa 4000 BCE in the Middle Neolithic. Russian-speakers call buckwheat гречка (grechka) meaning "little Greek", due to its introduction in the seventh century by the Byzantine Greeks; the same is the case in Ukrainian.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The oldest remains found in China so far date to circa 2600 BCE, while buckwheat pollen found in Japan dates from as early as 4000 BCE. It is the world's highest-elevation domesticate, being cultivated in Yunnan on the edge of the Tibetan Plateau or on the plateau itself. Buckwheat was one of the earliest crops introduced by Europeans to North America. Dispersal around the globe was complete by 2006, when a variety developed in Canada was widely planted in China. In India, buckwheat flour is known as kuttu ka atta and is culturally associated with Navratri festival. On the day of this festival, food items made only from buckwheat are consumed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat, a short-season crop, does well on low-fertility or acidic soils, but the soil must be well drained. Too much fertilizer, especially nitrogen, reduces yields. In hot climates it can only be grown by sowing late in the season, so that it blooms in cooler weather. The presence of pollinators greatly increases the yield. The nectar from buckwheat flower makes a dark-colored honey. It is sometimes used as a green manure, as a plant for erosion control, or as wildlife cover and feed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Agricultural production</strong></p> <p>The plant has a branching root system with one primary root that reaches deeply into the moist soil.[8] Buckwheat has triangular seeds and produces a flower that is usually white, although can also be pink or yellow.[9] Buckwheat branches freely, as opposed to tillering or producing suckers, causing a more complete adaption to its environment than other cereal crops.[8] The seed hull density is less than that of water, making the hull easy to remove.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat is raised for grain where a short season is available, either because it is used as a second crop in the season, or because the climate is limiting. Buckwheat can be a reliable cover crop in summer to fit a small slot of warm season. It establishes quickly, which suppresses summer weeds.[10] Buckwheat has a growing period of only 10–12 weeks[11] and it can be grown in high latitude or northern areas.[12] It grows 30 to 50 inches (75 to 125 cm) tall.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Historical data</strong></p> <p>A century ago, the Russian Empire was the world leader in buckwheat production.[13] Growing areas in the Russian Empire were estimated at 6.5 million acres (2,600,000 ha), followed by those of France at 0.9 million acres (360,000 ha).[14] In 1970, the Soviet Union grew an estimated 4.5 million acres (1,800,000 ha) of buckwheat. It remains in 2014 a key cereal.[15] Production in China expanded greatly during the 2000s, to rival Russia's output.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the northeastern United States, buckwheat was a common crop in the 18th and 19th centuries. Cultivation declined sharply in the 20th century due to the use of nitrogen fertilizer, to which maize and wheat respond strongly. Over 1,000,000 acres (400,000 ha) were harvested in the United States in 1918. By 1954, that had declined to 150,000 acres (61,000 ha), and by 1964, the last year annual production statistics were gathered by USDA, only 50,000 acres (20,000 ha) were grown. However it may benefit from an "explosion in popularity of so-called ancient grains" reported in the years 2009-2014.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Food</strong></p> <p>The fruit is an achene, similar to sunflower seed, with a single seed inside a hard outer hull. The starchy endosperm is white and makes up most or all of buckwheat flour. The seed coat is green or tan, which darkens buckwheat flour. The hull is dark brown or black, and some may be included in buckwheat flour as dark specks. The dark flour is known as blé noir (black wheat) in French, along with the name sarrasin (saracen).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat noodles have been eaten by people from Tibet and northern China for centuries, as wheat can not be grown in the mountain regions. A special press made of wood is used to press the dough into hot boiling water when making buckwheat noodles. Old presses found in Tibet and Shanxi share the same basic design features. The Japanese and Koreans may have learned the making of buckwheat noodles from them.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In India, on Hindu fasting days (Navaratri, Ekadashi, Janmashtami, Maha Shivaratri etc.), fasting people in northern states of India eat items made of buckwheat flour. Eating cereals such as wheat or rice is prohibited during such fasting days. However, since buckwheat is not a cereal, it is considered acceptable for consumption during Hindu fasting days. While strict Hindus do not even drink water during their fast (observing Nirjal Upwas), others just give up cereals and salt and take a meal prepared from non-cereal ingredients such as buckwheat (kuttu). The preparation of buckwheat flour varies across India. The famous ones are kuttu ki puri (buckwheat pancakes) and kuttu pakoras (potato slices dipped in buckwheat flour and deep-fried in oil). In most of northern and western states, buckwheat flour is called kuttu ka atta.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat noodles play a major role in the cuisines of Japan (soba),[40] Korea (naengmyeon, makguksu and memil guksu) and the Valtellina region of Northern Italy (pizzoccheri). Soba noodles are the subject of deep cultural importance in Japan. In Korea, guksu (noodles) were widely made from buckwheat before it was replaced by wheat.[citation needed] The difficulty of making noodles from flour with no gluten has resulted in a traditional art developed around their manufacture by hand.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat groats are commonly used in western Asia and eastern Europe. The porridge was common, and is often considered the definitive peasant dish. It is made from roasted groats that are cooked with broth to a texture similar to rice or bulgur. The dish was brought to America by Ukrainian, Russian, and Polish immigrants who called it kasha, and they mixed it with pasta or used it as a filling for cabbage rolls, knishes, and blintzes, hence buckwheat prepared in this fashion is most commonly called kasha in America. Groats were the most widely used form of buckwheat worldwide during the 20th century, eaten primarily in Estonia, Russia, Ukraine, and Poland, called grechka in Ukrainian or Russian. The groats can also be sprouted and then eaten raw or cooked.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Buckwheat pancakes, sometimes raised with yeast, are eaten in several countries. They are known as buckwheat blinis in Russia, galettes in France (savoury crêpes made with buckwheat flour, water, and eggs are associated with Lower Brittany, whilst savoury galettes made without eggs are from Higher Brittany), ployes in Acadia, and boûketes (which are named after the buckwheat plant) in the Wallonia region of Belgium. Similar pancakes were a common food in American pioneer days.[41] They are light and foamy. The buckwheat flour gives them an earthy, mildly mushroom-like taste. In Ukraine, yeast rolls called hrechanyky are made from buckwheat. Buckwheat flour is also used to make Nepali dishes such as dhedo and kachhyamba.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Farina made from groats are used for breakfast food, porridge, and thickening materials in soups, gravies, and dressings. In Korea, buckwheat starch is used to make a jelly called memilmuk. It is also used with wheat, maize (polenta taragna in northern Italy) or rice in bread and pasta] products.</p> <p>Buckwheat is a good honey plant, producing a dark, strong monofloral honey.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Beverages</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Beer</strong></p> <p>In recent years, buckwheat has been used as a substitute for other grains in gluten-free beer. Although it is not an actual cereal (being a pseudocereal), buckwheat can be used in the same way as barley to produce a malt that can form the basis of a mash that will brew a beer without gliadin or hordein (together gluten) and therefore can be suitable for coeliacs or others sensitive to certain glycoproteins.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Whisky</strong></p> <p><strong>Shōchū</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat shōchū is a Japanese distilled beverage produced since the 16th Century. The taste is milder than barley shōchū.</p> <p><strong>Tea</strong></p> <p><strong>Upholstery filling</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat hulls are used as filling for a variety of upholstered goods, including pillows and zafu. The hulls are durable and do not conduct or reflect heat as much as synthetic fills. They are sometimes marketed as an alternative natural fill to feathers for those with allergies. However, medical studies to measure the health effects of buckwheat hull pillows manufactured with unprocessed and uncleaned hulls, concluded such buckwheat pillows do contain higher levels of a potential allergen that may trigger asthma in susceptible individuals than do new synthetic-filled pillows.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Biological control</strong></p> <p>Buckwheat is currently being studied and used as a pollen and nectar source to increase natural predator numbers to control crop pests in New Zealand.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cultural</strong></p> <p>The buckwheat plant is celebrated in Kingwood, West Virginia, at the Preston County Buckwheat Festival, where people can participate in swine-, cattle-, and sheep-judging contests, vegetable contests, and craft fairs. The area fire departments also play an important role in the series of parades that occur there. Each year, a King Buckwheat and Queen Ceres are elected. Also, many rides are available, and homemade, homegrown buckwheat cakes and sausage are served.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 75 (3g)
Buckwheat Seeds (Fagopyrum esculentum)
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Butterhead Lettuce Seed Vuka

Butterhead Lettuce Seed Vuka

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<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Butterhead Lettuce Seed Vuka</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1000 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p class="">An early Serbian butterhead spring head lettuce, the rosette is with laid leaves, the leaves are tender, light yellow-green in color, with weakly expressed ribs. The heads are well curled, firm, round, weighing 250-280 g. The flowering tree develops late, which enables the long use of lettuce.</p> <p><strong>Seed sowing:</strong><strong> </strong>March to July<br><strong>Harvest salads:</strong> Beginning be<br><strong>Height:</strong> The lettuce attraction reaches on average 20 to 25cm<br><strong>Exposure:</strong>&nbsp;Halfshade</p> <p><strong>Sowing instructions:</strong> Seed sowing August to September directly in place after any danger of frost is past, sow 1 cm from depth, water ground even in the event of rain. You can also start earlier in a shelter. Transplant after approximately 20 to 30 days. To help the formation of apple water young lettuces on the leaves in full sun. Cut lettuce ten weeks after sowing.</p> <p><strong>Sowing distance:</strong> 25 x 30 cm between plants<br><strong>Minimum seed sowing temperature:</strong>&nbsp;10°C<br><strong>Seed germination:</strong> 6 to 8 days<br><strong>Nutritional value:</strong> 15 Kcal for 100 gr.</p> <p><strong>Net weight of seeds:</strong> 4 gr. = +/- 3200 seeds</p> <p><strong>Companion Plants:</strong> Carrot, Radish, Strawberry, Cucumber.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 213 VS (1g)
Butterhead Lettuce Seed Vuka
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Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia...

Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia...

Regular price €2.15 -33% Price €1.44
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<h2><strong>Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia melanocarpa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 250-400 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><i><b>Aronia</b></i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a genus of<span>&nbsp;</span>deciduous<span>&nbsp;</span>shrubs, the<span>&nbsp;</span><b>chokeberries</b>, in the family<span>&nbsp;</span>Rosaceae<span>&nbsp;</span>native to eastern North America and most commonly found in wet woods and swamps.<span>&nbsp;</span>The genus is usually considered to contain two<span>&nbsp;</span>or three<span>&nbsp;</span>species, one of which is<span>&nbsp;</span>naturalized<span>&nbsp;</span>in Europe.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>A fourth form that has long been cultivated under the name<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Aronia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is now considered to be an<span>&nbsp;</span>intergeneric hybrid,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>× Sorbaronia mitschurinii</i>.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Chokeberries are cultivated as<span>&nbsp;</span>ornamental plants<span>&nbsp;</span>and as<span>&nbsp;</span>food products. The sour berries, or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>aronia berries</b>, can be eaten raw off the bush, but are more frequently processed. They can be found in wine, jam, syrup, juice, soft spreads, tea, salsa, extracts, beer, ice cream,<span>&nbsp;</span>gummies, and<span>&nbsp;</span>tinctures.<sup id="cite_ref-Iowa_State_8-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The name "chokeberry" comes from the<span>&nbsp;</span>astringency<span>&nbsp;</span>of the fruits, which create the sensation of making one's mouth pucker.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">Chokeberries are often mistakenly called<span>&nbsp;</span>chokecherries, the<span>&nbsp;</span>common name<span>&nbsp;</span>for<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Prunus virginiana</i>. Further adding to the ambiguity, a<span>&nbsp;</span>variety<span>&nbsp;</span>of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Prunus virginiana</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is<span>&nbsp;</span><i>melanocarpa</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and readily confused with black chokeberry because it is commonly referred to as "black chokeberry" or "aronia". Aronia berries and chokecherries both contain<span>&nbsp;</span>polyphenolic<span>&nbsp;</span>compounds, such as<span>&nbsp;</span>anthocyanins, yet the two plants are only distantly related within the Rosaceae.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Identification_and_taxonomy">Identification and taxonomy</span></h2> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves<span>&nbsp;</span>are alternate, simple, and<span>&nbsp;</span>oblanceolate<span>&nbsp;</span>with<span>&nbsp;</span>crenate<span>&nbsp;</span>margins and<span>&nbsp;</span>pinnate<span>&nbsp;</span>venation; in autumn, the leaves turn a bold red color. Dark<span>&nbsp;</span>trichomes<span>&nbsp;</span>are present on the upper midrib surface. The<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers<span>&nbsp;</span>are small, with five<span>&nbsp;</span>petals<span>&nbsp;</span>and five<span>&nbsp;</span>sepals, and produced in<span>&nbsp;</span>corymbs<span>&nbsp;</span>of 10–25 together. The<span>&nbsp;</span>hypanthium<span>&nbsp;</span>is urn-shaped. The fruit is a small<span>&nbsp;</span>pome, with an<span>&nbsp;</span>astringent<span>&nbsp;</span>flavor.</p> <p><i>Aronia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>has been thought to be closely related to<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Photinia</i>, and has been included in that genus in some classifications,<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>but botanist Cornelis Kalkman observed that a combined genus should be under the older name<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Aronia</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-Kalkman_11-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The combined genus contains about 65 species.<sup id="cite_ref-weakley_12-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In 2004, Kalkman expressed doubt about the<span>&nbsp;</span>monophyly<span>&nbsp;</span>of the combined group, and new molecular studies confirm this.<sup id="cite_ref-Potter_13-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-Campbell_14-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>They do not place these two genera together or even near one another.</p> <p>In eastern North America, two well-known species are named after their fruit color, red chokeberry and black chokeberry, plus a purple chokeberry whose origin is a natural hybrid of the two.<sup id="cite_ref-weakley_12-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>A fourth species,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Aronia mitschurinii</i>, that apparently originated in cultivation, is also known as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Sorbaronia mitschurinii</i>.<br><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><br>Tends to be smaller, rarely exceeding 1 m (3ft) tall and 3 m (9.8ft) wide, and spreads readily by root sprouts. The leaves are smaller, not more than 6-cm wide, with terminal glands on leaf teeth and a glabrous underside. The flowers are white, 1.5 cm wide, with glabrous sepals. The fruit is black, 6–9 mm wide, not persisting into winter.<br></span></p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p><i>Aronia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is considered cold-hardy and heat tolerant in<span>&nbsp;</span>USDA<span>&nbsp;</span>zones 3 to 8.<sup id="cite_ref-usda_17-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Aronia plants grow well both in<span>&nbsp;</span>orchard-type rows or set as<span>&nbsp;</span>landscape<span>&nbsp;</span>elements, including several varieties in 3 to 12-foot heights.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Products_and_uses">Products and uses</span></h2> <p>The chokeberries are attractive<span>&nbsp;</span>ornamental plants<span>&nbsp;</span>for gardens. They are naturally understory and woodland edge plants, and grow well when planted under<span>&nbsp;</span>trees. Chokeberries are resistant to drought, insects, pollution, and disease. A number of<span>&nbsp;</span>cultivars, including<span>&nbsp;</span><i>A. arbutifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>'Brilliant' and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>A. melanocarpa</i><span>&nbsp;</span>'Autumn magic', have been selected for their striking fall leaf color.</p> <p>An aronia wine is made in<span>&nbsp;</span>Lithuania<span>&nbsp;</span>and Minnesota. In<span>&nbsp;</span>Poland, aronia berries are added to jams and juices or dried to make a herbal<span>&nbsp;</span>tea<span>&nbsp;</span>sometimes blended with other ingredients, such as<span>&nbsp;</span>blackcurrant.<sup id="cite_ref-mckay_19-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[19]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In<span>&nbsp;</span>Bosnia and Herzegovina, the berries are sold fresh and frozen or made into juices, jams and teas.<sup id="cite_ref-Fresh_Fruit_Portal_20-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Aronia is also used as a<span>&nbsp;</span>flavoring<span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span>colorant<span>&nbsp;</span>for beverages or yogurts.<sup id="cite_ref-mckay_19-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[19]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Juice from the ripe berries is<span>&nbsp;</span>astringent, semi-sweet (moderate sugar content), sour (low<span>&nbsp;</span>pH), and contains a low level of<span>&nbsp;</span>vitamin C.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The berries have a tart<span>&nbsp;</span>flavor<span>&nbsp;</span>and, in addition to juice, can be baked into breads.<sup id="cite_ref-mckay_19-2" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[19]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>In the United States and Canada, aronia<span>&nbsp;</span>juice concentrate<span>&nbsp;</span>is used in manufactured juice blends.</p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Polyphenol_content">Polyphenol content</span></h3> <p><i>A. melanocarpa</i><span>&nbsp;</span>(black chokeberry) has attracted scientific interest due to its deep purple, almost black<span>&nbsp;</span>pigmentation<span>&nbsp;</span>that arises from dense contents of<span>&nbsp;</span>polyphenols, especially<span>&nbsp;</span>anthocyanins. Total polyphenol content is 1752&nbsp;mg per 100 g dry weight,<sup id="cite_ref-Phenol-Explorer_22-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[22]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>anthocyanin content is 1480&nbsp;mg per 100 g dry weight, and<span>&nbsp;</span>proanthocyanidin<span>&nbsp;</span>concentration is 664&nbsp;mg per 100 g fresh weight.<sup id="cite_ref-Wu_23-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[23]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[24]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>These values are among the highest measured in plants to date. The black aronia species contains higher levels of anthocyanins than purple (<i>Aronia prunifolia</i>) or red aronia (<i>Aronia arbutifolia</i>), whereas red and purple aronia are richer in phenolic acid and proanthocyanins.</p> <p>The plant produces these pigments mainly in the leaves and skin of the berries to protect the pulp and seeds from constant exposure to<span>&nbsp;</span>ultraviolet radiation<span>&nbsp;</span>and production of<span>&nbsp;</span>free radicals.<sup id="cite_ref-simon_26-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[26]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[27]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;">[28]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>By absorbing<span>&nbsp;</span>UV<span>&nbsp;</span>rays in the<span>&nbsp;</span>blue-purple spectrum, leaf and skin pigments filter intense sunlight, serve antioxidant functions and thereby have a role assuring regeneration of the species. Brightly colorful pigmentation also attracts birds and other animals to consume the fruit and disperse the seeds in their droppings.<sup id="cite_ref-simon_26-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>Analysis of polyphenols in chokeberries has identified the following individual chemicals (among hundreds known to exist in the plant kingdom):<span>&nbsp;</span>cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-arabinoside,<span>&nbsp;</span>quercetin-3-glycoside,<span>&nbsp;</span>epicatechin,<span>&nbsp;</span>caffeic acid,<span>&nbsp;</span>delphinidin,<span>&nbsp;</span>petunidin,<span>&nbsp;</span>pelargonidin,<span>&nbsp;</span>peonidin, and<span>&nbsp;</span>malvidin.<sup id="cite_ref-Wu_23-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-pmid23941506_25-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-30" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>All these except caffeic acid are members of the<span>&nbsp;</span>flavonoid<span>&nbsp;</span>category of phenolics.</p> <p>For reference to phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and similar plant-derived phytochemicals,<sup id="cite_ref-Phenol-Explorer_22-1" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Wikipedia has a<span>&nbsp;</span>list of phytochemicals and foods in which they are prominent.</p> <p><span style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"></span><br><br></p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 8- 12 hours&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <div> <div style="text-align: center;">Genus: Aronia</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Species: melanocarpa</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Common Name: Black Chokeberry</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Other Name: Chokeberry, Gueles Noires</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Pre-treatment: required</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Zone Hardiness Cold: 3</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Zone Hardiness warm: 8</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Plant Type: Small Shrub</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Growth rate: medium</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Vegetation type: deciduous</div> <div style="text-align: center;">Leaf /Flower color: Green/White</div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 29 (1g)
Chokeberry Seeds (Aronia melanocarpa)
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Fortal yellow french bean seeds  - 3

Fortal yellow french bean...

Regular price €1.25 -18% Price €1.03
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Fortal french bean seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 20 (4g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Fortal is an early low bush bean with light yellow round pods, very high yielding with light yellow pods of average length 13-14 cm and white seeds. The plant is very strong, up to 50 cm high and very disease tolerant. The bean pods ripening in 45-55 days.</p> <p>Excellent variety for fresh use, salads, etc.</p> <p>It is mainly intended for fresh consumption, but it can very well be frozen and stored for winter use.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 50 F (4g)
Fortal yellow french bean seeds  - 3
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Celeriac Seeds Giant Prague

Giant Prague Celeriac Seeds

Regular price €1.25 -17% Price €1.04
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Prague Celeriac Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2000 (1g), 20000 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Well shaped smooth celeriac, vigorous roots, upright foliage. Round, relatively smooth skin with good inner quality. Suited to fresh market and storage.</p> <p><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></p> <p><strong>Site &amp; Soil</strong></p> <p>Celeriac has been bred from wild celery which originates from Northern Europe. They grow best in soil that has been fertilized the previous season and not the current season. Too much nitrogen in the soil from manure etc. will encourage leaf growth rather than growth of the bulbous root. </p> <p>The best soil is one that retains moisture but is also free-draining. Although those are the ideal conditions celeriac is very tolerant of soil conditions and will grow well on most sites. </p> <p>They prefer a site which is in full sun but will tolerate part-shade very well.</p> <p><strong>When to Sow</strong></p> <p>In cooler areas, sow indoors or in a greenhouse / cold frame. Sow two seeds to a small pot (7.5cm / 3in) in early March.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18 - 20°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">12°C: 32 Days</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">20°C: 15 days</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
VE 16 (1g)
Celeriac Seeds Giant Prague
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Giant White fig seeds from...

Giant White fig seeds from...

Regular price €1.95 -24% Price €1.48
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<h2><strong>Giant White fig seeds from Dalmatia</strong></h2><h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" data-mce-style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2><p>We personally picked and brought this fig from Herzegovina for the first time on August 10.08.2020. As you can see from our pictures, fruits are huge and have an average weight of 100 - 130 grams.</p><p>The white fig is an old Italian variety known as Fico ottato (dottato). It has lush growth and a high pyramidal crown. The white fig is a variety of very high yields.</p><p>The white fig is two-leaved, it is a very old variety of fig. The fruit is very large. The flesh is sweet and the color of the fruit is yellow-green. It is a lush tree, bears abundant fruit, and blooms twice.</p><p>The white fig ripens in late July and early September, and the ripening period is short (one month).</p><p>Spring bloom from degenerated female flowers, fleshy and grows to normal size, but never edible. The summer inflorescence develops an edible fruit, elongated by a short neck, and can reach a weight of over 150 g.</p><p>The fruits are of good quality, suitable for transport and consumption in fresh condition and drying. The flesh is light white under the skin and pale honey on the inside, very juicy, pleasantly sweet.</p><p>White fig very widespread in the Neretva valley in southern and central Dalmatia.</p><p>The fruits have great dietary and nutritional value, and medicinal for stomach diseases, anemia, etc.</p><p>White fig is consumed fresh, dry, like jam, sweet, compote, jelly, and juice.</p><p>Due to its nutritional composition and medicinal properties, the fig tree rises above many types of fruit. We all already know that it is proven to erase wrinkles and rejuvenate, and we also know that the fig or fig leaf used to be the first clothing a long time ago.</p><p>Fig fruits are very nutritious and of high dietary therapeutic value. They are especially in demand in the fresh state during the tourist season, but also processed differently during the year, mostly as dried fruits (dried figs).</p>
V 19 GWF (20 S)
Giant White fig seeds from Dalmatia
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