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Sugar beet seeds Authority...

Sugar beet seeds Authority...

Prijs € 1,75 SKU: P 8
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Sugar beet seeds Authority - Heirloom</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Sugar beet - a cold-resistant, light-loving culture, medium-demanding to the fertility of the soil. Sugar beet gives high stable yields, easy to transport. Sugar beet loves heat, light, and moisture.</p> <p>The amount of sugar in the fruit depends on the number of sunny days in August — October. Sugar beet is used not only for making sugar but also for feeding animals.</p> <p>The optimum temperature for seed germination is 10–12 ° C, growth, and development is 20–22 ° C. Shoots are sensitive to frost.</p> <p>Name: Sugar beet Authority<br />Harvest: 75-100 days<br />Root weight: 500-850 g<br />The sugar content: 18-21%<br />Sowing depth: 2-3 cm.</p> <p>tion temperature: 10-15 ° C.</p>
P 8 (20 S)
Sugar beet seeds Authority - Heirloom

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Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds...

Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds...

Prijs € 1,65 SKU: MHS 38
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Thai Holy Basil Seeds (Ocimum tenuiflorum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 0,036g (100), 1g (2800) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This kind of Basil has a spicy, peppery, clove-like taste, may be the basil Thai people love most and is at least used in all street kitchens and restaurants in the country.</p> <p>Ocimum tenuiflorum, also known as Ocimum sanctum, holy basil, or tulasi or tulsi (also sometimes spelled thulasi), is an aromatic plant in the family Lamiaceae which is native to the Indian subcontinent and widespread as a cultivated plant throughout the Southeast Asian tropics.[2][3] It is an erect, many-branched subshrub, 30–60 cm (12–24 in) tall with hairy stems and simple phyllotaxic green or purple leaves that are strongly scented.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Leaves have petioles and are ovate, up to 5 cm (2.0 in) long, usually slightly toothed. The flowers are purplish in elongate racemes in close whorls.[3] The two main morphotypes cultivated in India and Nepal are green-leaved (Sri or Lakshmi tulasi) and purple-leaved (Krishna tulasi).[4]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tulasi is cultivated for religious and medicinal purposes, and for its essential oil. It is widely known across the Indian subcontinent as a medicinal plant and a herbal tea, commonly used in Ayurveda, and has an important role within the Vaishnava tradition of Hinduism, in which devotees perform worship involving holy basil plants or leaves. This plant is revered as an elixir of life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The variety of Ocimum tenuiflorum used in Thai cuisine is referred to as Thai holy basil (Thai: กะเพรา kaphrao);[2] it is not to be confused with Thai basil, which is a variety of Ocimum basilicum.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Genetics</strong></p> <p>DNA barcodes of various biogeographical isolates of Tulsi from the Indian subcontinent are now available. In a large-scale phylogeographical study of this species conducted using chloroplast genome sequences, a group of researchers from Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, have found that this plant originates from North Central India.[5][6] The discovery might suggest the evolution of Tulsi is related with the cultural migratory patterns in the Indian subcontinent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p><strong>In Hinduism</strong></p> <p>Tulsi leaves are an essential part in the worship of Vishnu and his avatars, including Krishna and Ram, and other male Vaishnava deities such as Hanuman, Balarama, Garuda and many others. Tulsi is a sacred plant for Hindus and is worshipped as the avatar of Lakshmi.[7] It is believed that water mixed with the petals given to the dying raises their departing souls to heaven.[8] Tulsi, which is Sanskrit for "the incomparable one", is most often regarded as a consort of Krishna in the form of Lakshmi.[9][10] According to the Brahma Vaivarta Purana, tulsi is an expression of Sita.[11][full citation needed] There are two types of tulsi worshipped in Hinduism: "Rama tulsi" has light green leaves and is larger in size; "Shyama tulsi" has dark green leaves and is important for the worship of Hanuman.[12] Many Hindus have tulasi plants growing in front of or near their home, often in special pots. Traditionally, tulsi is planted in the centre of the central courtyard of Hindu houses. It is also frequently grown next to Hanuman temples, especially in Varanasi.[13][full citation needed]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>According to Vaishnavas, it is believed in Puranas that during Samudra Manthana, when the gods win the ocean-churning against the asuras, Dhanvantari comes up from the ocean with Amrit in hand for the gods. Dhanvantari, the divine healer, sheds happy tears, and when the first drop falls in the Amrit, it forms tulasi. In the ceremony of Tulsi Vivaha, tulsi is ceremonially married to Krishna annually on the eleventh day of the waxing moon or twelfth of the month of Kartik in the lunar calendar. This day also marks the end of the four-month Chaturmas, which is considered inauspicious for weddings and other rituals, so the day inaugurates the annual marriage season in India. The ritual lighting of lamps each evening during Kartik includes the worship of the tulsi plant, which is held to be auspicious for the home. Vaishnavas especially follow the daily worship of tulsi during Kartik.[14] In another legend, Tulsi was a pious woman who sought a boon to marry Vishnu. Lakshmi, Vishnu's consort, cursed her to become a plant in earth. However, Vishnu appeased her by giving her a boon that she would grace him when he appears in the form of Shaligrama in temples.[15]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Vaishnavas traditionally use Hindu prayer beads made from tulsi stems or roots, which are an important symbol of initiation. Tulsi rosaries are considered to be auspicious for the wearer, and believed to put them under the protection of Hanuman. They have such a strong association with Vaishnavas, that followers of Hanuman are known as "those who bear the tulsi round the neck".</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Ayurveda</strong></p> <p>Tulasi (Sanskrit:-Surasa) has been used for thousands of years in Ayurveda for its diverse healing properties. It is mentioned in the Charaka Samhita,[16] an ancient Ayurvedic text. Tulsi is considered to be an adaptogen,[17] balancing different processes in the body, and helpful for adapting to stress.[18] Marked by its strong aroma and astringent taste, it is regarded in Ayurveda as a kind of "elixir of life" and believed to promote longevity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tulasi extracts are used in ayurvedic remedies for a variety of ailments. Traditionally, tulasi is taken in many forms: as herbal tea, dried powder, fresh leaf or mixed with ghee. Essential oil extracted from Karpoora tulasi is mostly used for medicinal purposes and in herbal cosmetics.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Thai cuisine</strong></p> <p>The leaves of holy basil, known as kaphrao in the Thai language (Thai: กะเพรา), are commonly used in Thai cuisine. Kaphrao should not be confused with horapha (Thai: โหระพา), which is normally known as Thai basil, or with Thai lemon basil (maenglak; Thai: แมงลัก).</p> <p>The best-known dish made with this herb is phat kaphrao (Thai: ผัดกะเพรา) — a stir-fry of Thai holy basil with meats, seafood or, as in khao phat kraphao, with rice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Insect repellent</strong></p> <p>For centuries, the dried leaves have been mixed with stored grains to repel insects.[24] In Sri Lanka this plant is used as a mosquito repellent. Sinhala: Maduruthalaa</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Pharmacological study</strong></p> <p>Some of the main chemical constituents of tulsi are: oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, rosmarinic acid, eugenol, carvacrol, linalool, β-caryophyllene (about 8%), β-elemene (c.11.0%), and germacrene D (about 2%).</p> <p>Isolated O. sanctum extracts have some antibacterial activity against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Genome sequence</strong></p> <p>The genome of Tulsi plant has been sequenced and the draft genome has been published independently by research teams from CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants at Lucknow and National Centre for Biological Sciences at Bengaluru. The genome size was estimated to be 612 mega bases and results from the sequencing project show that certain metabolite-biosynthesis genes such as genes for biosynthesis of Anthocyanin in Krishna Tulsi variety, Ursolic acid and Eugenol in Rama Tulsi variety were expressed in large quantities. These metabolites were shown to have anti-cancerous properties as well. It was further commented that these metabolites could be utilized as anti-cancerous drugs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 38 (100 S)
Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds (Ocimum tenuiflorum)
Roselle Seeds - Edible and tasty

Roselle Seeds - Edible and...

Prijs € 1,75 SKU: MHS 19
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2><strong>Roselle Seeds - edible and tasty (Hibiscus sabdariffa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a species of Hibiscus native to the Old World tropics, used for the production of bast fibre and as an infusion. It is an annual or perennial herb or woody-based subshrub, growing to 2–2.5 m (7–8 ft) tall. The leaves are deeply three- to five-lobed, 8–15 cm (3–6 in) long, arranged alternately on the stems.</p> </div> <p>The flowers are 8–10 cm (3–4 in) in diameter, white to pale yellow with a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and have a stout fleshy calyx at the base, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) wide, enlarging to 3–3.5 cm (1.2–1.4 in), fleshy and bright red as the fruit matures. It takes about six months to mature.</p> <p><span><strong>Names</strong></span></p> <p><span>The roselle is known as the rosella or rosella fruit in Australia. It is also known as 'Belchanda' among Nepalese, Tengamora among Assamese and "mwitha" among Bodo tribals in Assam, চুকর Chukor in Bengali, Gongura in Telugu, Pundi in Kannada, Ambadi in Marathi, LalChatni or Kutrum in Mithila] Mathipuli in Kerala, chin baung in Burma, กระเจี๊ยบแดง KraJiabDaeng in Thailand, ສົ້ມ ພໍດີ som phor dee in Lao PDR, bissap in Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and Niger, the Congo and France, dah or dah bleni in other parts of Mali, wonjo in the Gambia, zobo in western Nigeria (the Yorubas in Nigeria call the white variety Isapa (pronounced Ishapa)), Zoborodo in Northern Nigeria, Chaye-Torosh in Iran, karkade (كركديه; Arabic pronunciation: [ˈkarkade])[dubious – discuss] in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Sudan, omutete in Namibia, sorrel in the Caribbean and in Latin America, Flor de Jamaica in Mexico, Saril in Panama, grosella in Paraguay and vinagreira, caruru-azedo or quiabo-roxo in Brazil. Rosela in Indonesia, asam belanda[1] in Malaysia. In Chinese it is 洛神花 (Luo Shen Hua) . In Zambia the plant is called lumanda in ciBemba, katolo in kiKaonde, or wusi in chiLunda.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plant is considered to have antihypertensive properties. In some places, the plant is primarily cultivated for the production of bast fibre from the stem of the plant. The fibre may be used as a substitute for jute in making burlap.[2] Hibiscus, specifically Roselle, has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild laxative, and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and cancer.[3]</span></p> <p><span>The red calyces of the plant are increasingly exported to America and Europe, where they are used as food colourings. Germany is the main importer. It can also be found in markets (as flowers or syrup) in some places such as France, where there are Senegalese immigrant communities. The green leaves are used like a spicy version of spinach. They give flavour to the Senegalese fish and rice dish thiéboudieune. Proper records are not kept, but the Senegalese government estimates national production and consumption at 700 t (770 short tons) per year. Also in Burma their green leaves are the main ingredient in making chin baung kyaw curry.</span></p> <p><span>In East Africa, the calyx infusion, called "Sudan tea", is taken to relieve coughs. Roselle juice, with salt, pepper, asafoetida and molasses, is taken as a remedy for biliousness.</span></p> <p><span>The heated leaves are applied to cracks in the feet and on boils and ulcers to speed maturation. A lotion made from leaves is used on sores and wounds. The seeds are said to be diuretic and tonic in action and the brownish-yellow seed oil is claimed to heal sores on camels. In India, a decoction of the seeds is given to relieve dysuria, strangury and mild cases of dyspepsia. Brazilians attribute stomachic, emollient and resolutive properties to the bitter roots.[4]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Leafy vegetable/Greens</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Andhra cuisine, Hibiscus cannabinus, called Gongura, is extensively used. The leaves are steamed along with lentils and cooked with Dal. The other unique dish prepared is gongura pachadi, it is prepared by mixing fried leaves with spices and made into a Gongura Pacchadi, the most famous dish of Andhra cuisine and is often described as king of all foods of Andhra ethnics(andhrulu)</span></p> <p><span>In Burmese cuisine, called chin baung ywet (lit. sour leaf), the roselle is widely used and considered an affordable vegetable for the population. It is perhaps the most widely eaten and popular vegetable in Burma.[5] The leaves are fried with garlic, dried or fresh prawns and green chili or cooked with fish. A light soup made from roselle leaves and dried prawn stock is also a popular dish.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Beverage</strong></span></p> <p><span>Cuisine: Among the Bodo tribals of Bodoland, Assam (India) the leaves of both hibiscus sabdariffa and hibiscus cannabinus are cooked along with chicken, fish or pork, one of their traditional cuisines</span></p> <p><span>In the Caribbean sorrel drink is made from sepals of the roselle. In Malaysia, roselle calyces are harvested fresh to produce pro-health drink due to high contents of vitamin C and anthocyanins. In Mexico, 'agua de Flor de Jamaica' (water flavored with roselle) frequently called "agua de Jamaica" is most often homemade. Also, since many untrained consumers mistake the calyces of the plant to be dried flowers, it is widely, but erroneously, believed that the drink is made from the flowers of the non-existent "Jamaica plant". It is prepared by boiling dried sepals and calyces of the Sorrel/Flower of Jamaica plant in water for 8 to 10 minutes (or until the water turns red), then adding sugar. It is often served chilled. This is also done in Saint Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago where it is called 'sorrel'. The drink is one of several inexpensive beverages (aguas frescas) commonly consumed in Mexico and Central America, and they are typically made from fresh fruits, juices or extracts. A similar thing is done in Jamaica but additional flavor is added by brewing the tea with ginger and adding rum. It is a popular drink of the country at Christmas time. It is also very popular in Trinidad &amp; Tobago but cinnamon, cloves and bay leaves are preferred to ginger. In Mali, Senegal, The Gambia, Burkina Faso and Benin calyces are used to prepare cold, sweet drinks popular in social events, often mixed with mint leaves, dissolved menthol candy, and/or various fruit flavors. The Middle Eastern and Sudanese drink "Karkade"(كركديه) is a cold drink made by soaking the dried Karkade flowers in cold water over night in a refrigerator with sugar and some lemon or lime juice added.It is then consumed with or without ice cubes after the flowers have been strained.In Lebanon, sometimes toasted pine nuts are tossed into the drink.</span></p> <p><span>With the advent in the U.S. of interest in south-of-the-border cuisine, the calyces are sold in bags usually labeled "Flor de Jamaica" and have long been available in health food stores in the U.S. for making a tea that is high in vitamin C. This drink is particularly good for people who have a tendency, temporary or otherwise, toward water retention: it is a mild diuretic.</span></p> <p><span>In addition to being a popular homemade drink, Jarritos, a popular brand of Mexican soft drinks, makes a Flor de Jamaica flavored carbonated beverage. Imported Jarritos can be readily found in the U.S.</span></p> <p><span>In the UK the dried calyces and ready-made sorrel syrup are widely and cheaply available in Caribbean and Asian grocers. The fresh calyces are imported mainly during December and January in order to make Christmas and New Year infusions, which are often made into cocktails with additional rum. They are very perishable, rapidly developing fungal rot, and need to be used soon after purchase – unlike the dried product, which has a long shelf-life.</span></p> <p><span>In Africa, especially the Sahel, roselle is commonly used to make a sugary herbal tea that is commonly sold on the street. The dried flowers can be found in every market. Roselle tea is also quite common in Italy where it spread during the first decades of the 20th century as a typical product of the Italian colonies. The Carib Brewery Trinidad Limited, a Trinidad and Tobago brewery, produces a Shandy Sorrel in which the tea is combined with beer.</span></p> <p><span>In Thailand, Roselle is generally drunk as a cool drink,[6] but also as a tea, believed to also reduce cholesterol. It can also be made into a wine.</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus flowers are commonly found in commercial herbal teas, especially teas advertised as berry-flavoured, as they give a bright red colouring to the drink.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella flowers are sold as Wild Hibiscus flowers in syrup in Australia as a gourmet product. Recipes include filling them with goats cheese, serving them on baguette slices baked with brie, &amp; placing one plus a little syrup, in a champagne flute before adding the champagne when the bubbles cause the flower to open.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Jam and preserves</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Nigeria, rosella jam has been made since Colonial times and is still sold regularly at community fetes and charity stalls. It is similar in flavour to plum jam, although more acidic. It differs from other jams in that the pectin is obtained from boiling the interior buds of the rosella flowers. It is thus possible to make rosella jam with nothing but rosella buds and sugar. Roselle is also used in Nigeria to make a refreshing drink known as Zobo.</span></p> <p><span>In Burma, the buds of the roselle are made into 'preserved fruits' or jams. Depending on the method and the preference, the seeds are either removed or included. The jams, made from roselle buds and sugar, are red and tangy.</span></p> <p><span>"Sorrel jelly" is manufactured in Trinidad.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella Jam is also made in Queensland, Australia as a home-made or speciality product sold at fetes and other community events.[7]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Medicinal uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>Many parts of the plant are also claimed to have various medicinal values. They have been used for such purposes ranging from Mexico through Africa and India to Thailand. Roselle is associated with traditional medicine and is reported to be used as treatment for several diseases such as hypertension and urinary tract infections.[8]</span></p> <p><span>Although Roselle has well documented hypotensive effects,[9] there is currently insufficient evidence to support the benefit of Roselle for either controlling or lowering blood pressure due to a lack of well designed studies that measure the efficacy of Roselle on patients with hypertension.[10]</span></p> <p><span>A double blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial was conducted to determine the effect of Roselle leaf extract on a group of 60 subjects with serum LDL values in the range of 130-190 ml/dl (&lt;130 ml/dl is a goal value for most patients[11]) and no history of coronary heart disease. The experimental group received 1g of Roselle leaf extract while the placebo group received a similar amount of maltodextrin in addition to dietary and physical activity advice. Both groups had decreases in body weight, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides that can likely be attributed to the dietary and physical activity advice. At a dose of 1g/day, Roselle leaf extract did not appear to have a blood lipid lowering effect.[12]</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus sabdariffa has shown in vitro antimicrobial activity against E. coli.[13] A recent review stated that specific extracts of H. sabdariffa exhibit activities against atherosclerosis, liver disease, cancer, diabetes and other metabolic syndromes.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Phytochemicals</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plants are rich in anthocyanins, as well as protocatechuic acid. The dried calyces contain the flavonoids gossypetin, hibiscetine and sabdaretine. The major pigment, formerly reported as hibiscin, has been identified as daphniphylline. Small amounts of myrtillin (delphinidin 3-monoglucoside), Chrysanthenin (cyanidin 3-monoglucoside), and delphinidin are also present. Roselle seeds are a good source of lipid-soluble antioxidants, particularly gamma-tocopherol.[15]</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><strong>Production</strong></span></p> <p><span>China and Thailand are the largest producers and control much of the world supply. Thailand invested heavily in roselle production and their product is of superior quality, whereas China's product, with less stringent quality control practices, is less reliable and reputable. The world's best roselle comes from the Sudan, but the quantity is low and poor processing hampers quality. Mexico, Egypt, Senegal, Tanzania, Mali and Jamaica are also important suppliers but production is mostly used domestically.[16]</span></p> <p><span>In the Indian subcontinent (especially in the Ganges Delta region), roselle is cultivated for vegetable fibres. Roselle is called meśta (or meshta, the ś indicating an sh sound) in the region. Most of its fibres are locally consumed. However, the fibre (as well as cuttings or butts) from the roselle plant has great demand in various natural fibre using industries.</span></p> <p><span>Roselle is a relatively new crop to create an industry in Malaysia. It was introduced in early 1990s and its commercial planting was first promoted in 1993 by the Department of Agriculture in Terengganu. The planted acreage was 12.8 ha (30 acres) in 1993, but had steadily increased to peak at 506 ha (1,000 acres) in 2000. The planted area is now less than 150 ha (400 acres) annually, planted with two main varieties.[citation needed] Terengganu state used to be the first and the largest producer, but now the production has spread more to other states. Despite the dwindling hectarage over the past decade or so, roselle is becoming increasingly known to the general population as an important pro-health drink in the country. To a small extent, the calyces are also processed into sweet pickle, jelly and jam. jimmon rubillos</span></p> <p><span><strong>Crop research</strong></span></p> <p><span>In the initial years, limited research work were conducted by University Malaya (UM) and Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI). Research work at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) was initiated in 1999. In many respect, the amount of research work is still considered meagre in supporting a growing roselle industry in Malaysia.</span></p> <p><span>Crop genetic resources &amp; improvement[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase the crop productivity. Being an introduced species in Malaysia, there is a very limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. At present, UKM maintains a working germplasm collection, and also conducts agronomic research and crop improvement.</span></p> <p><span>Mutation breeding[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase its productivity. Being an introduced crop species in Malaysia, there is a limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. Furthermore, conventional hybridization is difficult to carry out in roselle due to its cleistogamous nature of reproduction. Because of this, a mutation breeding programme was initiated to generate new genetic variability.[17] The use of induced mutations for its improvement was initiated in 1999 in cooperation with MINT (now called Malaysian Nuclear Agency), and has produced some promising breeding lines. Roselle is a tetraploid species; thus, segregating populations require longer time to achieve fixation as compared to diploid species. In April 2009, UKM launched three new varieties named UKMR-1, UKMR-2 and UKMR-3, respectively. These three new varieties were developed using variety Arab as the parent variety in a mutation breeding programme which started in 2006.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Natural outcrossing under local conditions</strong></span></p> <p><span>A study was conducted to estimate the amount of outcrossing under local conditions in Malaysia. It was found that outcrossing occurred at a very low rate of about 0.02%. However, this rate is much lower in comparison to estimates of natural cross-pollination of between 0.20% and 0.68% as reported in Jamaica.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Source: Wikipedia</strong></span></p>
MHS 19
Roselle Seeds - Edible and tasty
Cucumber - Melon Seeds - Carosello Barattiere

Cucumber Melon Seeds -...

Prijs € 1,45 SKU: PK 9
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Cucumber - Melon Seeds - Carosello Barattiere</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Apulian (Italy) Heirloom cultivar sweet oval cucumber-melon with smooth crisp light green skin. The white interior reveals a savory tender flesh that is bitter-free and does not cause indigestion as other cucumbers can. The Fruits are 500 grams of weight, round, dark green, smooth, without hair on the skin, contain less simple sugars and less sodium than the Cucumber species.</p> <p>Growth habit is spread out. A drought-resistant variety that does well in most places, including hot climates.</p> <p>Maturity: 60 days</p> <p>Open-pollinated Heirloom</p> <h3><strong>Sowing instructions:</strong></h3> <p>Plant seeds 1 inch deep indoors from March-April or directly outdoors from June-July. Transplant seedlings outdoors in June spacing plants 20-24 inches apart and rows 36 inches apart. Harvest from August-September.</p> <p>Maturity: 60 days</p> <p>Open-pollinated Heirloom</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PK 9 (5 S)
Cucumber - Melon Seeds - Carosello Barattiere

This plant is edible
Indian cress or Monks cress Seed – Edible 2 - 3

Indian cress or Monks cress...

Prijs € 2,00 SKU: MHS 53
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Indian cress or Monks cress Seed – Edible</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tropaeolum majus (garden nasturtium, Indian cress or monks cress) is a flowering plant in the family Tropaeolaceae, originating in the Andes from Bolivia north to Colombia. The species has become naturalized in parts of the United States (California, New York, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut).[3] It is of cultivated, probably hybrid origin, with possible parent species including T. minus, T. moritzianum, T. peltophorum, and T. peregrinum.[4][5] It is not closely related to the genus Nasturtium (which includes watercress).</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>It is a herbaceous annual plant with trailing stems growing to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) long or more. The leaves are large, nearly circular, 3 to 15 centimetres (1.2 to 5.9 in) diameter, green to glaucous green above, paler below; they are peltate, with the 5–30 cm long petiole near the middle of the leaf, with several veins radiating to the smoothly rounded or slightly lobed margin. The flowers are 2.5–6 cm diameter, with five petals, eight stamens, and a 2.5–3 cm long nectar spur at the rear; they vary from yellow to orange to red, frilled and often darker at the base of the petals. The fruit is 2 cm broad, three-segmented, each segment with a single large seed 1–1.5 cm long.</p> <p><strong>Das Elisabeth Linné-Phänomen</strong></p> <p>Das Elisabeth Linné-Phänomen, or the Elizabeth Linnæus Phenomenon, is the name given to the phenomenon of "Flashing Flowers".[8] Especially at dusk, the orange flowers may appear to emit small "flashes". Once believed to be an electrical phenomenon, it is today thought to be an optical reaction in the human eye caused by the contrast between the orange flowers and the surrounding green. The phenomenon is named after Elisabeth Christina von Linné, one of Carl Linnaeus's daughters, who discovered it at age 19.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>It is widely cultivated, both as an ornamental plant and as a medicinal plant.</p> <p>It is listed as invasive in several areas, including Hawaii, Lord Howe Island, New Zealand.</p> <p><strong>Culinary</strong></p> <p>All its parts are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially ornamental salad ingredient; it has a slightly peppery taste reminiscent of watercress, and is also used in stir fry. The flowers contain about 130 mg vitamin C per 100 grams (3.5 oz),[10] about the same amount as is contained in parsley.[11] Moreover, they contain up to 45 mg of lutein per 100 gr,[12] which is the highest amount found in any edible plant. The unripe seed pods can be harvested and dropped into spiced vinegar to produce a condiment and garnish, sometimes used in place of capers.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>The garden nasturtium is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the Dot Moth[14] and the Garden Carpet Moth.[15] A very common pest found on nasturtiums is the caterpillar of the Large White (Cabbage White) Butterfly.</p> <p><strong>Companion plants</strong></p> <p>Nasturtiums are also considered widely useful companion plants. They repel a great many cucurbit pests, like squash bugs, cucumber beetles, and several caterpillars. They have a similar range of benefits for brassica plants, especially broccoli and cauliflower. They also serve as a trap crop against black fly aphids. They also attract beneficial predatory insects.</p>
MHS 53
Indian cress or Monks cress Seed – Edible 2 - 3
Green Cardamom Seeds 1.95 - 1

Green Cardamom Seeds...

Prijs € 1,55 SKU: MHS 57 G
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Green Cardamom Seeds (Elettaria cardamomum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Elettaria cardamomum, commonly known as green or true cardamom, is a herbaceous perennial plant in the ginger family, native to southern India. It is the most common of the species whose seeds are used as a spice called cardamom. It is cultivated widely in tropical regions and reportedly naturalized in Réunion, Indochina and Costa Rica.</p> <p><strong>Growth</strong></p> <p>Elettaria cardamomum is a pungent aromatic herbaceous perennial plant, growing about to 2–4 m in height. The leaves are alternate in two ranks, linear-lanceolate, 40–60 cm long, with a long pointed tip. The flowers are white to lilac or pale violet, produced in a loose spike 30–60 cm long. The fruit is a three-sided yellow-green pod 1–2 cm long, containing several black and brown seeds.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The green seed pods of the plant are dried and the seeds inside the pod are used in Indian and other Asian cuisines, either whole or ground. It is the most widely cultivated species of cardamom; for other types and uses, see cardamom.</p> <p>Cardamom pods as used as a spice</p> <p>Ground cardamom is an ingredient in many Indian curries and is a primary contributor to the flavor of masala chai. In Iran, cardamom is used to flavor coffee and tea. In Turkey, it is used to flavor the black Turkish tea, kakakule in Turkish.</p> <p>As well as in its native range, it is also grown in Nepal, Vietnam, Thailand, and Central America. In India, the states of Sikkim and Kerala are the main producers of cardamom; they rank highest both in cultivated area and in production. It was first imported into Europe around 1300 BC.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 57 G (5 S)
Green Cardamom Seeds 1.95 - 1
Passiflora adenopoda Seeds 1.85 - 1

Passiflora adenopoda Seeds

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: V 22 PA
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Passiflora adenopoda Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The flowers are white and purple, 7 cm wide. Fruits turn violet at maturity.</p> <p>Passiflora adenopoda is a fun and easy plant to grow, the plant is a vine that will quickly grow into support by tendrils from the stem. When the plant is about 2m long it will start to profusely produce lots of flowers, with have a nice smell and attract lots of pollinators!</p> <p>Then fruits will appear, little green fruits the size of a plum, filled with seeds covered in a mucilage of bright orange color (DO NOT EAT GREEN, it is poisonous). When mature, the fruits will become purple and are really sweet in taste, great for drinks of fresh fruit.</p> <p>         Passiflora adenopoda is a tropical vine plant. This variety, native from Central America grows happily more than 4m but starts making flowers at just 2m from the base. These seeds come from Costa Rica, where it sometimes grows among people's gardens. They love full sun, but may have a little shade, which makes them have fewer flowers, it has three to five-lobed leaves of a light green color. The plant likes high soil humidity.</p> <p>This plant is a host plant for Heliconius charithonia butterfly, they lay the eggs on the leaves for their caterpillars to eat.</p> <p>Culture: sow the seeds 1 in. deep, on a group of 1 to 3 seeds on individual pots. Loose, well-drained soil is very important for good germination, but the plants won’t mind growing even on clay soils, a soil pH of 5–6 will give the best results. Plant a month after the last frost once the soil has warmed up, or in tropical regions, any time of the year. It may be grown outdoors in zones (USA 8-11) or indoors in a greenhouse. The plant may make flowers after some 4 months of growth depending on the conditions and fruits will develop just 1 month later. Harvest when fully yellow fruits are present to have the best sweetness.</p>
V 22 PA (3 S)
Passiflora adenopoda Seeds 1.85 - 1
White Water Rose Seeds (Nymphaea alba) 1.95 - 1

White Water Rose Seeds...

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: MHS 27
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>White Water Rose, </strong><strong>White Water-Lily Seeds (Nymphaea alba)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Nymphaea alba, also known as the European white water lily, white water rose or white nenuphar, is an aquatic flowering plant of the family Nymphaeaceae. It is native to North Africa, temperate Asia, Europe and Tropical Asia (India).</p> <p>It grows in water that is 30–150 cm (12–59 in) deep and likes large ponds and lakes.</p> <p>The leaves can be up to 30 cm (12 in) in diameter and take up a spread of 150 cm (59 in) per plant.[3] The flowers are white and they have many small stamens inside.</p> <p>They are found all over Europe and in parts of North Africa and the Middle East in fresh water.[5] In Africa, it is found in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. In temperate Asia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Siberia, Iran, Iraq, Israel and Turkey. It is found in tropical Asia, within the Indian provinces of Jammu and Kashmir. Lastly, within Europe, it is found in Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russian Federation, Ukraine Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Switzerland, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, France, Portugal and Spain.</p> <p>It contains the active alkaloids nupharine and nymphaeine, and is a sedative and an aphrodisiac/anaphrodisiac depending on sources.[citation needed] Although roots and stalks are used in traditional herbal medicine along with the flower, the petals and other flower parts are the most potent. Alcohol can be used to extract the active alkaloids, and it also boosts the sedative effects. The root of the plant was used by monks and nuns for hundreds of years as an anaphrodisiac, being crushed and mixed with wine. In the earliest printed medical textbooks, authors maintained this use, though warning against consuming large and frequent doses.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 27 (10 S)
White Water Rose Seeds (Nymphaea alba) 1.95 - 1

Deze plant heeft gigantische vruchten
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

Gigantische zonnebloem...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: VE 68
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Gigantische zonnebloem zaden Giant Russian Mammoth</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Prijs voor een verpakking van 1g (10), 9g (100) zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p>Deze populaire en gemakkelijk te kweken Giant Russian Mammoth Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Organic Heirloom Variety.</p> <p>Deze planten maken prachtige bloemen die smakelijke, eetbare zaden produceren. Stengels kunnen 2,1-3,7 meter worden met gigantische bloemen. Verdraagt slechtere bodems.</p> <p>Zaaien na vorstgevaar in een gebied met volle zon. Zaai het zaad 20 cm uit elkaar en ongeveer 2,5 cm diep. Dunne zaailingen als ze 7,5 cm hoog zijn, zodat de uiteindelijke afstand 13 cm uit elkaar ligt. Ze bloeien in de zomer.</p>
VE 68 (1g)
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1
Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear Seeds (Solanum muricatum) 2.55 - 6

Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear...

Prijs € 2,95 SKU: V 59
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;" class=""><strong>Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear Seeds (Solanum muricatum)</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Solanum muricatum is a species of evergreen shrub native to South America and grown for its sweet edible fruit.</p> <p>It is known as pepino dulce ("sweet pepino") or simply pepino; the latter is also used for similar species such as "S. mucronatum" (which actually seems to belong in the related genus Lycianthes). The pepino dulce fruit resembles a melon (Cucumis melo) in color, and its flavor recalls a succulent mixture of honeydew and cucumber, and thus it is also sometimes called pepino melon or melon pear, but pepinos are only very distantly related to melons and pears. Another common name, "tree melon", is more often used for the Papaya (Carica papaya) and the pepino dulce plant does generally not look much like a tree. The present species is, however, a close relative of other nightshades cultivated for their fruit, including the tomato (S. lycopersicum) and the eggplant (S. melongena), which its own fruit closely resembles.</p> <p>The fruit is common in markets in Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru and Chile, but less often overseas because it is quite sensitive to handling and does not travel well. Attempts to produce commercial cultivars and to export the fruit have been made in New Zealand, Turkey and Chile.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and habitat</strong></p> <p>The pepino dulce is presumed to be native to the temperate Andean regions of Colombia, Peru and Chile, though it is not known in the wild and the details of its domestication are unknown.Thepepino is a domesticated native of the Andes.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Moche clay vessel with pepino decoration (Larco Museum)</p> <p>Pepinos are not often found archaeologically as they are soft and pulpy and not easy to preserve, while their tough seeds are small and easily lost among debris. But they were already described by early Spanish chroniclers as being cultivated on the coast; the Moche Valley in Peru was particularly famous for them. They were a popular decorative motif in Moche art.</p> <p>In the United States the fruit is known to have been grown in San Diego before 1889 and in Santa Barbara by 1897. More commercially viable cultivars were introduced from New Zealand and elsewhere towards the end of the 20th century, leading to its introduction into up-scale markets in Japan, Europe and North America.</p> <p>The pepino dulce is relatively hardy. In its native range it grows at altitudes ranging from close to sea level up to 3,000 m (10,000 ft.). However, it performs best in a warm, relatively frost-free climate. The plant can survive a low temperature of -2.5°C (27 to 28°F) if the freeze is not prolonged, though it may drop many of its leaves.[2] The species is a perennial, but its sensitivity to chilling, pests, and diseases force the growers to replant the crop every year. The crop also adapts well to greenhouse cultivation, training the plants up to 2 m tall, and obtaining yields that are 2-3 times larger than those obtained outdoors.</p> <p>They are propagated by cuttings since they are established easily without rooting hormones. It is grown in a manner similar to its relatives such as the tomato, though it grows naturally upright by habit and can thus be cultivated as a free-standing bush, though it is sometimes pruned on trellises. Additionally, supports are sometimes used to keep the weight of the fruit from pulling the plant down. It has a fast growth rate and bears fruit within 4 to 6 months after planting. It is a perennial, but is usually cultivated as an annual. Seedlings are intolerant of weeds, but it can later easily compete with low growing weeds. Like their relatives tomatoes, eggplants, tomatillos and tamarillos, pepinos are extremely attractive to beetles, aphids, white flies and spider mites. Pepinos are tolerant of most soil types, but require constant moisture for good fruit production. Established bushes show some tolerance to drought stress, but this typically affects yield. The plants are parthenocarpic, meaning it needs no pollination to set fruit, though pollination will encourage fruiting.</p> <p><strong>Ripe pepinos</strong></p> <p>The plant is grown primarily in Chile, New Zealand and Western Australia. In Chile, more than 400 hectares are planted in the Longotoma Valley with an increasing proportion of the harvest being exported. Colombia, Peru, and Ecuador also grow the plant, but on a more local scale. Outside of the Andean region, it been grown in various countries of Central America, Morocco, Spain, Israel, and the highlands of Kenya. In the United States several hundred hectares of the fruit are grown on a small scale in Hawaii and California. More commercially viable cultivars have been introduced from New Zealand and elsewhere in more recent times. As a result, the fruit has been introduced into up-scale markets in Japan, Europe and North America and it is slowly becoming less obscure outside of South America. Delicate and mild-flavored, pepinos are often eaten as a fresh snack fruit, though they combine very well with a number of other fruits as well.</p> <p>The study of the molecular variation of this pepino is of interest for several reasons. Although the seeds of pepino plants are fertile and produce vigorous offspring, this crop is primarily propagated by cuttings (Heiser, 1964; Anderson, 1979; Morley-Bunker, 1983), and as a consequence, its genetic structure could be different from that of seed-propagated crops.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 59 5S
Pepino Dulce, Melon Pear Seeds (Solanum muricatum) 2.55 - 6
Tomaten Peper Zaden SPLENDID

Tomaten Peper Zaden SPLENDID

Prijs € 1,75 SKU: PP 71
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tomaten Peper Zaden SPLENDID</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs voor een pakket van 10 zaden. </strong></span></h2> <p>Het ziet eruit als een tomaat maar heeft een onvergetelijke smaak van paprika, de vruchten van deze Hongaarse paprika rijpen in 140-145 dagen. De vruchten zijn felrood van kleur en wegen gemiddeld 120-160 gram.</p> <p>Een zeer sterke plant, enigszins vatbaar voor ziektes, heeft geen ondersteuning nodig omdat hij zeer stabiel is!</p> <p>Voor vers eten, bottelen, inblikken, bakken, enz.</p> <p>Naast beplanting in de tuin is hij zeer geschikt om in bakken op terras, balkon en kas te houden!</p>
PP 71 (10 S)
Tomaten Peper Zaden SPLENDID
  • Nieuw
Paars Afrikaanse blauwe...

Paars Afrikaanse blauwe...

Prijs € 3,85 SKU: MHS 92
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Paars Afrikaanse blauwe basilicumzaden</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs voor Pakket van 100 zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p>Ocimum kilimandscharicum heeft een sterke kamfergeur, geërfd van Ocimum kilimandscharicum (kamferbasilicum), de Oost-Afrikaanse ouder. De concentratie kamfer is 22% (vergeleken met 61% voor O. kilimandscharicum). De concentratie van de andere belangrijke aromastoffen, linalool (55%) en 1,8-cineole (15%) is vergelijkbaar met die van veel basilicumcultivars.</p> <p>Het heeft overeenkomsten met zowel Thaise als zoete basilicum, maar heeft toch een geheel eigen smaak. De lange, roze bloemen vormen ook een opvallende garnering. Hoewel het nog niet algemeen bekend staat als een nuttig keukenkruid, vertoont het potentieel voor een grotere populariteit. Wanneer het aan een gerecht wordt toegevoegd, kan het smaken alsof er meer dan één kruid is gebruikt.</p> <p>De bladeren van Afrikaanse blauwe basilicum beginnen paars als ze jong zijn, worden alleen groen als het gegeven blad tot zijn volledige grootte groeit, en zelfs dan behouden ze de paarse kleur.</p> <p>Het is ook groter dan veel basilicumcultivars. Deze bloemen zijn erg goed in het aantrekken van bijen en andere bestuivers.</p>
MHS 92 (0.13 g)
Paars Afrikaanse blauwe basilicumzaden