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Best verkochte producten

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Item 1-12 van 38 in totaal item(s)
Giant Italian Tree Tomato seeds 5 - 1

Giant Italian Tree Tomato...

Prijs € 2,85
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Italian Tree Tomato seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <div>The Famous Italian Tree Tomato produces large crimson tomatoes that grow as big as 6 inches across! It has meaty centers with solid divisions. It is by far the most productive tomato, often producing 3 bushels from just one plant! When grown on a trellis the vines soar 12-18 feet and often to 25 feet. Even without a trellis The Famous Italian Tree tomatoes will out-yield other varieties. 70 days from setting out plants until first fruits mature...</div> </body> </html>
VT 6 (5 S)
Giant Italian Tree Tomato seeds 5 - 1
Quinoa Seeds Red or White (Chenopodium quinoa)

Quinoa Seeds Red or White...

Prijs € 2,00
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5/ 5
<div class="&quot;rte&quot;"><h2><strong>Quinoa Seeds (Chenopodium quinoa)</strong></h2><h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 700+- (2g) seeds.</strong></span></h2><p>Quinoa (/ˈkiːnwɑː/, from Quechua kinwa or kinuwa ) is a species of the goosefoot genus (Chenopodium quinoa), a grain crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, as it is not a member of the true grass family. As a chenopod, quinoa is closely related to species such as beetroots, spinach and tumbleweeds. As a member of the Amaranthaceae family, it is related to and resembles amaranth, which is also a pseudocereal.</p><p>It is high in protein, and is tolerant of dry soil.</p><p>Quinoa (the name is derived from the Spanish spelling of the Quechua name kinwa) originated in the Andean region of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile and Colombia, where it was domesticated 3,000 to 4,000 years ago for human consumption, though archaeological evidence shows a non-domesticated association with pastoral herding some 5,200 to 7,000 years ago.</p><p>Similar Chenopodium species, such as pitseed goosefoot (Chenopodium berlandieri) and fat hen (Chenopodium album), were grown and domesticated in North America as part of the Eastern Agricultural Complex before maize agriculture became popular. Fat hen, which has a widespread distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, produces edible seeds and greens much like quinoa, but in smaller quantities.</p><p>The nutrient composition is favourable compared with common cereals. Quinoa seeds contain essential amino acids like lysine and acceptable quantities of calcium, phosphorus, and iron.</p><p>After harvest, the seeds must be processed to remove the coating containing the bitter-tasting saponins. The seeds are in general cooked the same way as rice and can be used in a wide range of dishes. The leaves are eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like amaranth, but commercial availability of quinoa greens is limited.</p><p>Chenopodium quinoa is a dicotyledonous annual plant usually about 1–2 metres (3.3–6.6 ft) high. It has broad, generally pubescent, powdery, smooth (rarely) to lobed leaves normally arranged alternately. The woody central stem is branched or unbranched depending on the variety and may be green, red or purple. The flowering panicles arise from the top of the plant or from leaf axils along the stem. Each panicle has a central axis from which a secondary axis emerges either with flowers (amaranthiform) or bearing a tertiary axis carrying the flowers (glomeruliform). The green hypogynous flowers have a simple perianth and are generally bisexual and self-fertilizing. The fruits are about 2 millimetres (0.079 in) in diameter and of various colours—from white to red or black, depending on the cultivar.</p><p><strong>Natural distribution</strong></p><p>Chenopodium quinoa is believed to have been domesticated in the Peruvian Andes from wild or weed populations of the same species. There are non-cultivated quinoa plants (Chenopodium quinoa var. melanospermum) that grow in the area it is cultivated; these may either be related to wild predecessors, or they could be descendants of cultivated plants.</p><p><strong>Saponin content</strong></p><p>In their natural state, the seeds have a coating of bitter-tasting saponins, making them unpalatable. Most of the grain sold commercially has been processed to remove this coating. This bitterness has beneficial effects during cultivation, as it is unpopular with birds and therefore requires minimal protection. The genetic control of bitterness involves quantitative inheritance; lowering the saponin content through selective breeding to produce sweeter, more palatable varieties is complicated by about 10% cross-pollination.</p><p>The toxicity category rating of quinoa saponins treats them as mild eye and respiratory irritants and as a low gastrointestinal irritant. The saponin is a toxic glycoside, a main contributor to its hemolytic effects when combined directly with blood cells. In South America, quinoa saponin has many uses, including as a detergent for clothing and washing and as an antiseptic for skin injuries. High levels of oxalic acid are in the leaves and stems of all species of the Chenopodium genus, and are also in the related genera of the Amaranthaceae family. The risks associated with quinoa are minimal, provided it is properly prepared and the leaves are not eaten to excess.</p><p><strong>Nutritional value</strong></p><p>Quinoa was important to the diet of pre-Columbian Andean civilizations. Quinoa grain has been called a superfood, a term which is not in common use by dietitians and nutrition scientists. Protein content is very high for a cereal/pseudo-cereal (14% by mass), but not as high as most beans and legumes. This includes a "low gluten content" that appears to be well tolerated when consumed at normal levels by people with celiac disease. The protein content per 100 calories is higher than brown rice, potatoes, barley and millet, but is less than wild rice and oats. Nutritional evaluations indicate that quinoa is a source of complete protein. Other sources claim its protein is not complete but relatively high in essential amino acids. Other pseudo grains derived from seeds are similar in complete protein levels; buckwheat is 18% protein compared to 14% for Quinoa; Amaranth, a related species to Quinoa, ranges from 12% to 17.5%.</p><p>Quinoa is a rich source (&gt;20% of the Daily value, DV) of the B vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, and folate and is a rich source of the dietary minerals iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. Quinoa is also a good source (10-19% of DV) of the B vitamins niacin and pantothenic acid, vitamin E, and the dietary mineral potassium. The pseudo cereal contains a modest amount of calcium, and thus is useful for vegans and those who are lactose intolerant. It is gluten-free and considered easy to digest. Because of these characteristics, it is being considered a possible crop in NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System for long-duration human occupied space flights.</p><p>The grain may be germinated in its raw form to boost its nutritional value, provided that the grains are rinsed thoroughly to remove any saponin.[26] It has a notably short germination period: only 2–4 hours in a glass of clean water is enough to make it sprout and release gases, as opposed to 12 hours with wheat. This process, besides its nutritional enhancements, softens the seeds, making them suitable to be added to salads and other cold foods.</p><h3><strong>Cultivation</strong></h3><p>The plant's growth is highly variable due to a high complexity of different subspecies, varieties and landraces (domesticated plants or animals adapted to the environment in which they originated). However, in general it is undemanding and altitude-hardy. It is grown from coastal regions to over 4,000 m (13,000 ft) in the Andes near the equator, with most of the cultivars being grown between 2,500 metres (8,200 ft) and 4,000 metres (13,000 ft). Depending on the variety, optimal growing conditions are in cool climates with temperatures that vary between −4 °C (25 °F) during the night to near 35 °C (95 °F) during the day. Some cultivars can withstand lower temperatures without damage. Light frosts normally do not affect the plants at any stage of development, except during flowering. Mid-summer frosts during flowering, often occurring in the Andes, lead to sterilization of the pollen. Rainfall conditions are highly variable between the different cultivars, ranging from 300 to 1,000 millimetres (12 to 39 in) during growing season. Growth is optimal with well-distributed rainfall during early growth and development and dry conditions during seed maturation and harvesting.</p><p>Quinoa has been cultivated in the United States, primarily in the high elevation San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado where it was introduced in 1982. In this high-altitude desert valley, maximum summer temperatures rarely exceed 30 °C (86 °F) and night temperatures are about 7 °C (45 °F). Due to the short growing season, North American cultivation requires short-maturity varieties, typically of Bolivian origin.</p><h2><strong>Sowing</strong></h2><p>Quinoa plants do best in sandy, well-drained soils with a low nutrient content, moderate salinity, and a soil pH of 6 to 8.5.</p><p>The seedbed must be well prepared and drained to avoid waterlogging. In the Andes, the seeds are normally broadcast over the land and raked into the soil. Sometimes it is sown in containers of soil and transplanted later.</p><p><strong>Cultivation management</strong></p><p>Yields are maximised when 170 to 200 kg (370 to 440 lb) N/hectare is available.[citation needed] The addition of phosphorus does not improve yield. In eastern North America, it is susceptible to a leaf miner that may reduce crop success and which also affects the common weed and close relative Chenopodium album, but C. album is much more resistant.</p><p><strong><em>History and culture</em></strong></p><p><strong>Early history</strong></p><p>Quinoa was first domesticated by Andean peoples around 3,000 to 4,000 years ago. It has been an important staple in the Andean cultures where the plant is indigenous but relatively obscure in the rest of the world. The Incas, who held the crop to be sacred, referred to it as chisaya mama or "mother of all grains", and it was the Inca emperor who would traditionally sow the first seeds of the season using "golden implements". During the Spanish conquest of South America, the colonists scorned it as "food for Indians", and suppressed its cultivation, due to its status within indigenous religious ceremonies. The conquistadors forbade quinoa cultivation for a time and the Incas were forced to grow wheat instead.</p><p>The grain has become increasingly popular in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, China and Japan where it is not typically grown, increasing crop value. Between 2006 and early 2013 quinoa crop prices tripled. In 2011, the average price was US$3,115 per ton with some varieties selling as high as $8,000 per ton. This compares with wheat prices of $9 per bushel (about $340 per ton). Since the 1970s, producers’ associations and cooperatives have worked toward greater producer control of the market. The higher prices make it harder for people to purchase, but also brings a livable income for farmers and enables many urban refugees to return to working the land.</p><p>The popularity of quinoa grain in non-indigenous regions has raised concerns over food security. Due to continued widespread poverty in regions where it is produced and because few other crops are compatible with the soil and climate in these regions, it has been suggested that the inflated price disrupts local access to food supplies. In 2013, The Guardian compared it to asparagus cultivated in Peru, a cash crop criticized for excessive water use, as "feeding our apparently insatiable 365-day-a-year hunger for this luxury vegetable" It has been suggested that, as people rise above subsistence-level income, they choose higher-status Western processed foods. However, anthropologist Pablo Laguna states that farmers are still saving a portion of the quinoa crop for their own use, and that the high prices affect nearby city dwellers more, but consumption in cities has traditionally been lower. According to Laguna, the net benefit of increased revenue for farmers outweighs the costs, saying that it is "very good news for small, indigenous farmers". The transformation from a healthy staple food for farming families and communities into a product that is held to be worth too much to keep for oneself and one's family is an ongoing process. It is seen as a valuable resource that can bring in far greater amounts[clarification needed] of cheap, low nutrient foods such as pasta and rice. It used to be seen as a peasant food that provided farming families with a very important source of nutrition, but now occupies a spectrum from an everyday food of urban Bolivia's middle class to a luxury food in the Peruvian capital of Lima where "it sells at a higher per pound price than chicken, and four times as much as rice". Efforts are being made in some areas to distribute it more widely and ensure that farming and poorer populations have access to it and have an understanding of its nutritional importance. These include incorporating it into free school breakfasts and in government provisions distributed to pregnant and nursing women in need.</p><p><strong>Kosher controversy</strong></p><p>Quinoa has become popular in the Jewish community as a substitute for the leavened grains that are forbidden during the Passover holiday. Several kosher certification organizations refuse to certify it as being kosher for Passover, citing reasons including its resemblance to prohibited grains or fear of cross-contamination of the product from nearby fields of prohibited grain or during packaging.</p><p>In December 2013, the Orthodox Union, the world's largest kosher certification agency, announced it would begin certifying quinoa as kosher for Passover.</p><p><strong>International Year of Quinoa</strong></p><p>The United Nations General Assembly declared 2013 as the "International Year of Quinoa"  in recognition of ancestral practices of the Andean people, who have preserved it as food for present and future generations, through knowledge and practices of living in harmony with nature. The objective is to draw the world’s attention to the role that quinoa could play in providing food security, nutrition and poverty eradication, in support of achieving Millennium Development Goals.</p><p>The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations is as the Secretariat of the international year. Bolivia has the presidency of the Coordination Committee and Ecuador, Peru and Chile share the vice presidency, with the rapporteurship in the hands of Argentina and France.</p></div>
P 219 C
Quinoa Seeds Red or White (Chenopodium quinoa)
Lemon Balm Seeds Herb 1.95 - 1

Lemon Balm Seeds (Melissa...

Prijs € 1,95
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Lemon Balm Seeds Herb (Melissa Officinalis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 700 seeds (0,5g).</strong></span></h2> <p><strong style="font-size:14px;">Lemon balm</strong><span style="font-size:14px;"> (</span><em style="font-size:14px;">Melissa officinalis</em><span style="font-size:14px;">),</span><sup></sup><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><strong style="font-size:14px;">balm</strong><span style="font-size:14px;">,</span><sup></sup><span style="font-size:14px;"> </span><strong style="font-size:14px;">common balm</strong><span style="font-size:14px;">,</span><sup></sup><span style="font-size:14px;"> or </span><strong style="font-size:14px;">balm mint</strong><span style="font-size:14px;">, is a </span>perennial<span style="font-size:14px;"> </span>herbaceous plant<span style="font-size:14px;"> in the mint family </span>Lamiaceae<span style="font-size:14px;"> and </span>native<span style="font-size:14px;"> to </span>south-central Europe<span style="font-size:14px;">, the </span>Mediterranean Basin<span style="font-size:14px;">, </span>Iran<span style="font-size:14px;">, and </span>Central Asia<span style="font-size:14px;">, but now naturalized in the Americas and elsewhere.</span></p> <p>It grows to a maximum height of 70–150 cm (28–59 in). The leaves have a mild lemon scent similar to mint. During summer, small white flowers full of nectar appear. It is not to be confused with bee balm (genus <em>Monarda</em>), although the white flowers attract bees, hence the genus <em>Melissa</em> (Greek for "honey bee").</p> <div> <div> <div><img alt="Lemon Balm Seeds Herb (Melissa Officinalis)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/00/Bumblebee_on_Melissa_flower.jpg/220px-Bumblebee_on_Melissa_flower.jpg" width="220" height="293" style="border-width:1px;" title="Lemon Balm Seeds Herb (Melissa Officinalis)" /><div> <div></div> a bumblebee feeding on a lemon balm flower</div> </div> </div> The leaves are used as a herb, in teas, and also as a flavouring. The plant is used to attract bees for honey production. It is grown as an ornamental plant and for its oil (to use in perfumery). The tea of lemon balm, the essential oil, and the extract are used in traditional and alternative medicine, including aromatherapy. The plant has been cultivated at least since the 16th century, but research is still being conducted to establish the safety and effects of lemon balm.</div> <div> <h2>History and domestication</h2> <p>Sources date the medicinal use of lemon balm to over 2000 years ago through the Greeks and Romans. It is mentioned by Theophrastus in the <em>Historia Plantarum</em>, dated to around 300 BC,<sup>[5]</sup> as "honey-leaf" (μελισσόφυλλον).<sup>[6]</sup> Lemon balm was formally introduced into Spain in the 7th century, from which its use and domestication spread throughout Europe.<sup>[5]</sup> Its use in the Middle Ages is noted by herbalists, writers, philosophers, and scientists, with Swiss physician and alchemist, Paracelsus, deeming it the “elixir of life”.<sup>[7]</sup><sup>[8]</sup>It was in the herbal garden of John Gerard, 1596.<sup>[9]</sup> Lemon balm was introduced to North America with the arrival of early colonists, and is recorded to have been among the herbs cultivated in Thomas Jefferson's garden.<sup>[10]</sup></p> <h2>Uses</h2> <p>The plant is used to attract bees to make honey. It is also grown and sold as an ornamental plant. The essential oil is used as a perfume ingredient,<sup>[11]</sup> but the plant has other culinary and medicinal uses. Lemon balm is used in some toothpastes.<sup>[12]</sup></p> <h3>Culinary</h3> <p>Lemon balm is used as a flavouring<sup>[11]</sup> in ice cream and herbal teas, both hot and iced, often in combination with other herbs such as spearmint. It is a common addition to peppermint tea, mostly because of its complementing flavor.<sup>[<em><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (October 2016)">citation needed</span></em>]</sup></p> <p>Lemon balm is also paired with fruit dishes or candies. Additionally, it can be used in fish dishes and is the main ingredient in <em>lemon balm pesto</em>.<sup>[13]</sup><sup>:15–16</sup> Its flavour comes from citronellal (24%), geranial (16%), linalyl acetate (12%) and caryophyllene (12%).<sup>[<em><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (August 2013)">citation needed</span></em>]</sup></p> <p>It is also one of the ingredients in Spreewald gherkins.</p> <h3>Traditional medicine</h3> <div> <div><img alt="Lemon Balm Seeds Herb (Melissa Officinalis)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9e/MelissaEssentialOil.png/220px-MelissaEssentialOil.png" width="220" height="329" style="border-width:1px;" title="Lemon Balm Seeds Herb (Melissa Officinalis)" /><div> <div></div> "Melissa" (<em>M. officinalis</em>) essential oil</div> </div> </div> <p>In traditional Austrian medicine, <em>M. officinalis</em> leaves have been prescribed for internal use—as a tea—or external application—as an essential oil—for the treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, nervous system, liver, and bile.<sup>[14]</sup> Lemon balm is the main ingredient of Carmelite water, which is still for sale in German pharmacies.<sup>[15]</sup></p> <p>In alternative medicine it is used as a sleep aid and digestive aid.<sup>[16]</sup></p> <p>Lemon balm essential oil is popular in aromatherapy.<sup>[17]</sup> The essential oil is commonly co-distilled with lemon oil, citronella oil or other oils.</p> <h3>Folklore and traditional uses</h3> <p>Nicholas Culpeper considered lemon balm to be ruled by Jupiter in Cancer, and suggested it to be used for weak stomachs, to cause the heart to become merry, to help digestion, to open obstructions of the brain, and to expel melancholy vapors from the heart and arteries.<sup>[18]</sup></p> <p>The herbalist John Gerard considered it especially good for feeding and attracting honeybees. The alchemist Paracelsus believed that lemon balm had the power to restore health and vitality.<sup>[19]</sup> Traditionally, an alchemical tincture of lemon balm was the first tincture an aspiring alchemist made.<sup>[20]</sup></p> <h2>Cultivation</h2> <p><em>Melissa officinalis</em> is native to Europe, central Asia and Iran, but is now naturalized around the world.<sup></sup><sup></sup></p> <p>Lemon balm seeds require light and at least 20 °C (70 °F) to germinate. Lemon balm grows in clumps and spreads vegetatively, as well as by seed. In mild temperate zones, the stems of the plant die off at the start of the winter, but shoot up again in spring. Lemon balm grows vigorously; it should not be planted where it will spread into other plantings.</p> <p>As of 1992, the major producing countries were Hungary, Egypt, and Italy for herb, and Ireland for essential oil.</p> <h2>Medical research</h2> <h3>Sleep</h3> <p>Lemon balm, including lemon balm extract, has been shown to improve sleep quality.<sup>[23]</sup><sup>[24]</sup><sup>[5]</sup> Pediatric patients have displayed improvement in restlessness and dyssomnia with the ingestion of lemon balm extract.<sup>[23]</sup>Further evidence has demonstrated a significant reduction in levels of insomnia.<sup>[24]</sup></p> <h3>Anxiety and depression</h3> <p>Lemon balm is commonly associated with anti-stress and anti-anxiety.<sup>[25]</sup><sup>[26]</sup><sup>[27]</sup> Studies have shown a significant increase in calmness in healthy patients exposed to lemon balm when compared to placebo.<sup>[25]</sup> In addition, lemon balm ingestion is linked to improvement in mood and cognitive performance.<sup>[26]</sup><sup>[25]</sup> Gender and administration length appear to have an impact on the effectiveness of lemon balm as a treatment for depression in rats.<sup>[27]</sup></p> <h3>Antioxidant</h3> <p>Several studies have demonstrated the lemon balm's antioxidant activity, obtained through high amounts of flavonoids, rosmaric acid, gallic acid and phenolic contents.<sup>[28]</sup><sup>[29]</sup><sup>[7]</sup></p> <h3>Additional properties</h3> <p>Lemon balm has also been shown to possess antimicrobial, antiviral, antispasmodic and antitumoral properties.<sup></sup></p> <p>The composition and pharmacology and potential uses of lemon balm have been extensively studied, especially with regard to its traditional uses.<sup>[32]</sup> Randomized, double-blinded clinical studies in people, however, have been limited and have had few subjects. Those studies cannot be used for generalized conclusions about the safety or efficacy of lemon balm and its components; what doses are safe and effective is especially not clear.<sup>[32]</sup></p> <h2>Chemistry</h2> <p>Lemon balm contains eugenol, tannins, and terpenes.<sup>[33]</sup> It also contains (+)-citronellal, 1-octen-3-ol, 10-α-cadinol, 3-octanol, 3-octanone, α-cubebene, α-humulene, β-bourbonene, caffeic acid, caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, catechin, chlorogenic acid, <em>cis</em>-3-hexenol, <em>cis</em>-ocimene, citral A, citral B, copaene, δ-cadinene, eugenyl acetate, γ-cadinene, geranial, geraniol, geranyl acetate, germacrene D, isogeranial, linalool, luteolin-7-glucoside, methylheptenone, neral, nerol, octyl benzoate, oleanolic acid, pomolic acid ((1<em>R</em>)-hydroxyursolic acid), protocatechuic acid, rhamnazin, rosmarinic acid, stachyose, succinic acid, thymol, <em>trans</em>-ocimene and ursolic acid.<sup>[34]</sup><sup>[35]</sup> Lemon balm may contain traces of harmine.<sup>[36]</sup></p> <p>Rosmarinic acid appears to be the most important active component, but the interaction of chemicals within lemon balm, and with chemicals in other herbs with which it has been commonly used in traditional medicines, is poorly understood.<sup>[32]</sup> Lemon balm leaf contains roughly 36.5 ± 0.8 mg rosmarinic acid per gram.</p> </div>
MHS 5
Lemon Balm Seeds Herb 1.95 - 1
Key limoenzaden (Citrus...

Key limoenzaden (Citrus...

Prijs € 2,25
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Key limoenzaden (Citrus aurantifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs voor pakket met 2 zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p>De Lime Citrus aurantiifolia is een citrus met een bolvormige vrucht, 25-50 mm in doorsnee. Het wordt meestal geplukt terwijl het nog groen is, maar het wordt geel als het rijp is.<br><br>De Key-limoen is kleiner, seedier, heeft een hogere zuurgraad, een sterker aroma en een dunnere korst dan de Perzische limoen. Het wordt gewaardeerd om zijn karakteristieke smaak. De naam komt van de associatie met de Florida Keys, waar het vooral bekend is als het smaakstofingrediënt in Key lime pie. Het is ook bekend als West-Indische limoen, barman limoen, Omaanse limoen of Mexicaanse limoen, de laatste geclassificeerd als een apart ras met een dikkere huid en een donkerdere groene kleur. Filippijnse variëteiten hebben verschillende namen, waaronder dayap en bilolo.<br><br>Omschrijving<br><br>C. aurantiifolia is een struikachtige boom, tot 5 m (16 ft), met veel doornen. Er bestaan ​​dwergvariëteiten die tijdens de wintermaanden en in koudere klimaten binnenshuis kunnen worden gekweekt. De stam, die zelden recht groeit, heeft veel takken en komt vaak vrij ver beneden op de stam vandaan. De bladeren zijn eivormig, 25-90 mm (1-3 1⁄2 in) lang, en lijken op oranje bladeren (de wetenschappelijke naam aurantiifolia verwijst naar deze gelijkenis met de bladeren van de sinaasappel, Citrus aurantium). De bloemen hebben een diameter van 25 mm (1 inch), zijn geelachtig wit met een lichtpaarse tint aan de randen. Bloemen en fruit verschijnen het hele jaar door, maar komen het meest voor van mei tot september op het noordelijk halfrond.<br><br>Huidcontact kan soms fytofotodermatitis veroorzaken, waardoor de huid bijzonder gevoelig is voor ultraviolet licht.<br><br>Teelt en vermeerdering<br><br>Er zijn verschillende benaderingen voor de teelt van Key limes. Deze citrusvariëteit kan worden vermeerderd uit zaad en zal trouw aan de ouder worden.<br>Als de planten uit zaad worden vermeerderd, moeten de zaden minstens 5-6 maanden voor het planten worden bewaard.&nbsp;</p>
V 119 CAKL
Key limoenzaden (Citrus aurantifolia)

Kristalka winter salad seeds

Kristalka winter salad seeds

Prijs € 1,85
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Kristalka winter salad seeds</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;" class="">Price for Package of 1000 (1g) seeds.</span> </strong></h2> <div>Kristalka winter salad is a favorite winter salad in Serbia, perfectly adapted to cold Serbian winter conditions. It tolerates winter well and in the spring forms compact, green, fragile leaf heads with a slightly red border on the leaf, which gives it an even more beautiful appearance. It is resistant to disease and an excellent choice for cultivation in the greenhouse, and open field cultivation.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 135 (1g)
Kristalka winter salad seeds

Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6

Purple Corn Seeds - Maíz...

Prijs € 2,25
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Corn - Maíz Morado "Kculli" - Purple Maize Seeds</strong> <strong>(Zea mays amylaceaa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0101;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 4,5g (10), 9g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Purple corn, a variety of Zea mays, is an Andean crop from low valleys locally called maiz Morado. Purple corn can be found mostly in Peru, where it is cultivated on the coast, as well as in lands almost ten thousand feet high. There are different varieties of purple corn, and all of them originated from an ancestral line called “Kculli”, still cultivated in Peru. The Kculli line is very old, and ancient objects in the shape of these particular ears of corn have been found in archeological sites at least 2,500 years old in places on the central coast, as well as among the ceramics of the “Mochica” culture.</p> <p>The kernels of purple corn are soaked in hot water by people of the Andes to yield a deep purple color for foods and beverages, a practice now recognized for its industrial uses as a colorant. Common in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru, purple corn is used in chicha Morada, a drink made by boiling ground purple corn kernels with pineapple, cinnamon, clove, and sugar, and in mazamorra, a type of pudding. One of the most popular purple corn food uses is the "Api", a smoothie served hot and sometimes called "Inca's dessert".</p> <p>Purple corn contains substantial amounts of phenolics and anthocyanins, among other phytochemicals. Its main colorant is cianidin-3-b-glucosa. People of the Andes make a refreshing drink from purple corn called "chicha Morada" which is now recognized as a nutritive powerhouse due to its phenolic content. Phenolics are known to have many bioactive and functional properties. Research shows that crops with the highest total phenolic and anthocyanin content also have the highest antioxidant activity.</p> <p>Anthocyaninins are a type of complex flavonoid that produce blue, purple or red colors.&nbsp;</p> <p>Purple Corn has a higher antioxidant capacity and antiradical kinetics than blueberries and higher or similar anthocyanin and phenolic contents.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 72 (4.5g)
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6
SNAKE GOURD Seeds (Trichosanthes cucumerina) 2.35 - 11

SNAKE GOURD Seeds...

Prijs € 2,35
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>SNAKE GOURD Seeds (Trichosanthes cucumerina)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Snake gourds are long and curved vegetables that fall into two different categories. There are the extremely long varieties that are grown for ornamental purposes and have hard skin and there are those grown for eating and medicinal purposes.</p> <p>These Snake gourds have a waxy green skin and are often speckled or striped with a lighter shade of green. The fruit is eaten when young. Longer varieties are best harvested when they are between 16 and 18 inches long. Smaller varieties are best harvested at 6 to 8 inches in length.</p> <p>When the gourd is young, the seeds are fairly nonexistent and the pulp around the seed mass is firm. The taste of a Snake gourd is similar to that of a cucumber. As a Snake gourd gets older, the rind gets hard and turns red. The taste becomes bitter and the insides gelatinous. The seeds are very hard and look similar to jagged-edged watermelon seeds. </p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong><br />Snake gourds are available during the late summer and fall months. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong><br />Some of the longest gourds in the world are known as Snake gourd or ‘Serpent’ gourd. There are several varieties of Snake gourd that are cultivated and grown in India and other areas of the sub-tropics. These cucumber relatives can grow up to five or six feet long and when dried, can be made into a didgeridoo, an Australian Aboriginal wind instrument. Farmers tie stones to the ends of the fruit to weigh it down while it grows, to ensure straighter gourds. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Applications</strong><br />Snake gourd can be prepared and used like zucchini; sautéed and served as a side dish or added to dishes with other sautéed vegetables. Snake gourds can also be stuffed or sliced and grilled. In Asian dishes, Snake gourd is made into chutneys and pickled. When the gourd is mature, the seed mass within is scraped out and used like tomato paste in various Indian dishes. <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Ethnic/Cultural Info</strong></p> <p>In Ayurveda, the ancient medical system of India, the Snake gourd serves multiple purposes. Ingesting the fruit, leaves and flowers of the Snake gourd plant aided in digestive disorders, diabetes, skin diseases and general malaise. </p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>Snake gourds are native to southeastern Asia, Australia and the islands of the Western Pacific. Originally domesticated in India, the serpent-like gourd can be found growing in Africa and other tropical and sub-tropical areas around the world. Botanically known as Trichosanthes cucumerina, Snake gourd seeds traveled from China to Europe via traders in the early 18th century, and were believed to have been planted at Monticello by Thomas Jefferson in 1820. </p> <p> </p> <h2>WIKIPEDIA:</h2> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina is a tropical or subtropical vine, its variety T. cucumerina var. anguina raised for its strikingly long fruit, in Asia eaten immature as a vegetable much like the summer squash, and in Africa, the reddish pulp of its mature fruit is used as an economical substitute of tomato.[2] Common names of the cultivated variety include snake gourd[note 1],[4] serpent gourd,[4] chichinda,[4] and padwal[4] (not to be confused with Trichosanthes dioica, the parwal, another gourd edible when immature).</p> <p> </p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina is found in the wild across much of South and Southeast Asia, including India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), and southern China (Guangxi and Yunnan).[5] It is also regarded as native in northern Australia.[6][7] and naturalized in Florida,[8] parts of Africa and on various islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.[9]</p> <p> </p> <p>Formerly, the cultivated form was considered a distinct species, T. anguina, but it is now generally regarded as conspecific with the wild populations, as they freely interbreed:</p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina var. anguina (L.) Haines – cultivated variant</p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina var. cucumerina – wild variant</p> <p> </p> <p>Trichosanthes cucumerina is a monoecious annual vine climbing by means of tendrils. Leaves are palmately lobed, up to 25 cm long. Flowers are unisexual, white, opening at night, with long branching hairs on the margins of the petals. These hairs are curled up in the daytime when the flower is closed, but unfurl at night to form a delicate lacy display (see photos in gallery below). Fruits can be up to 200 cm long, deep red at maturity, hanging below the vine.</p> <p>The related Japanese snake gourd (Trichosanthes pilosa, sometimes called T. ovigera or T. cucumeroides), very similar in vegetative morphology, but the fruit of T. pilosa is round to egg-shaped, only about 7 cm long.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The common name "snake gourd" refers to the narrow, twisted, elongated fruit. The soft-skinned immature fruit can reach up to 150 cm (59 in) in length. Its soft, bland, somewhat mucilaginous flesh is similar to that of the luffa and the calabash. It is popular in the cuisines of South Asia and Southeast Asia and is now grown in some home gardens in Africa. With some cultivars, the immature fruit has an unpleasant odor and a slightly bitter taste, both of which disappear in cooking. The fruit becomes too bitter to eat as it reaches maturity, but it does contain a reddish pulp that is used in Africa as a substitute for tomatoes.</p> <p>The shoots, tendrils, and leaves are also eaten as greens.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
P 370 SG
SNAKE GOURD Seeds (Trichosanthes cucumerina) 2.35 - 11

Deze plant heeft gigantische vruchten
Giant strawberry seeds

Gigantische aardbeienzaden

Prijs € 2,85
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Gigantische aardbeienzaden</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Prijs voor Pakket van 100 (0,06g) zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p>Aardbeien, Fragaria ananassa L. Maximus, zijn vrij eenvoudig te kweken! Ze zijn meerjarig, winterhard en zullen in de volle zon gedijen, zolang de grond vruchtbaar en goed gedraineerd is. Gezonde planten zullen jarenlang een overvloed aan bessen produceren! Aardbeien zijn zo groot als appels! Dit standaard type "GIANT" zorgt voor de grootste oogst! Deze doordragende Reuzen zullen de hele zomer produceren voor de Beste desserts en snacks!<br><br>Aardbeien hebben licht nodig om te ontkiemen en hun zaden mogen niet bedekt zijn. Maar de praktijk heeft uitgewezen dat onbedekte aardbeienzaden tijdens het ontkiemen zeer snel uitdrogen. Ik raad daarom aan om het zaad heel licht af te dekken met gezeefde zaaigrond. Na het zaaien en bevochtigen kunt u ook een ruit op de zaaibak plaatsen.<br><br>Zaden hebben minimaal 60 dagen stratificatie nodig</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 1 GS (0,06G)
Giant strawberry seeds
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Black Strawberry Seeds -...

Prijs € 2,25
,
5/ 5
<h2>Black Strawberry Seeds - Exotic Rare</h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></h2> <p><strong style="color:#ff0000;font-size:18px;"></strong>A lovely Black Strawberry that is fully hardy. Perfect for small spaces or containers, it will produce an abundance of small sweet fruit, with a hint of pineapple.</p> <p>Heavy cropping and easy to grow.</p> <p>Perennial herb densely clustered with straighter branches.15-25cm in height. Cymose anthotaxy with juicy flesh. Require loosing and weeding at intervals on the loose fertile soil with ample organic fertilizers. Favor to warm and need moisture to live through the winter.</p> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p> </div> </div>
V 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Verscheidenheid uit Amerika
Bloody Butcher Sweetcorn Seeds 1.95 - 5

Bloody Butcher Sweetcorn Seeds

Prijs € 1,55
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Bloody Butcher Sweetcorn Seeds - Heirloom</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for pack of 10 (4g), 50 (21g), 100 (42g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Bloody Butcher is old type corn has been grown in the United States since at least 1845. Plants can grow up to 2,5 meters or more in height producing two to six corncob per plant.&nbsp;</p> <p>Grown mainly as an ornamental now. Bloody Butcher was originally used as sweet corn, for roasting or frying corn when young, ground and used as a corn flour. Its young corns are sweet but become tougher when older.&nbsp;</p> <p>Ready for harvest in around 100 days.&nbsp;</p> <p>Corn enjoys well-drained fertile soil and plenty of water!</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 3 (4g)
Bloody Butcher Sweetcorn Seeds 1.95 - 5
Black Corn Seeds Black Aztek

Black Corn Seeds Black Aztek

Prijs € 2,45
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black Corn Seeds Black Aztek</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 10 (2,5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>One of the few black corn varieties, the Black Aztec traces back to the 1800s. The plant (1,8 meters tall) produces high yields of beautiful 20 to 25&nbsp; centimeters long black corn. Excellent variety for roasting and grinding into cornmeal. It's a good choice for cornmeal or flour. Also used for fall decorations. An excellent choice for home gardens and market growers.</p> <p>Over the years it has been known as, or synonymous with, 'Black Aztec', 'Black Sugar', 'Black Sweet', 'Mexican Sweet', and simply as 'Mexican'.</p> <p>The finest seeds through the finest seeds selection process to ensure the quality of the seeds, great disease tolerance as well as very high germination.</p> <p>Name: BLACK AZTEK</p> <p>Days to maturity: 75 days.</p> <p>Plant height: 1,8 meters tall</p> <p>Planting Season: Spring/Summer</p> <p>Sunlight Requirement: Full Sun</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 2 (2.5g)
Black Corn Seeds Black Aztek


Deze plant heeft gigantische vruchten
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco

Worlds Largest Giant Corn...

Prijs € 2,25
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Native to Peru and Ecuador Peruvian Giant Corn - also known as Choclo is a hideously large variety of corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The stalks reach up to 5 - 5,50 meters in height, a runt in a litter of this cultivar would tower over standard varieties at a whopping 4 metars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">In standard varieties of corn the average weight runs from 25 - 35 grams per 100 kernels In Peruvian Giant Corn the weight per 100 kernels runs from 90 - 95 grams per 100 kernels - that's nearly 3 times the size and yield.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">It is a late maturing corn and is estimated to need 120 - 150 days to mature. They are not an easy crop to produce, it requires determination and vigilance to grow.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">One would think being indigenous to the Andes mountainous they would be adapted to windy conditions, but this is not the case. They evolved in the Peruvian Urrabamba Valley and vicinity which is sheltered and has relatively mild weather.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn aka Choclo </span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">They do not withstand strong winds and need persistent staking, at 4 - 5,50 metars in height that's a chore and a half.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The plants produce numerous relatively short cobs with gigundous kernels.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The taste is comparable to standard sweet corn. It is not overly sweet - mild to blandly sweet with a creamy texture would be the best description. Peruvians usually boil them. In Ecuador and Bolivia they dry them first then burst or "pop" them in oil - somewhat like popcorn. We gringos can enjoy them the same as any other corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn Should be planted in blocks as opposed to rows and should not be planted near other varieties of Corn [See - Isolating Sweet Corn.] Cross pollination tends to produce poor tasting starchy corn. Sugar Pearl, as per some suppliers does not need to be isolated as other varieties do - this is just fine for the Sugar Pearl, but not necessarily the other variety.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn can be seeded directly into the soil, or it can also be started indoors and later transplanted. If starting indoors be sure you have a larger than standard container as it could easily outgrow the container before transplant time. Whichever you choose, Plant it in blocks, at least four rows wide, for proper pollination and well-filled ears</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Sowing depth Aprox.: 5 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Germination: 6 to 8 days</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Maturity: at 120 - 150 days.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Color: White - Pale Yellow</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Seed Spacing: 30-35 cm apart.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Row spacing: 100 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">USDA Hardiness Zones: 3- 9</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant Size: 400 - 550 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn cob Size: 17-20 cm Long</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Full Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Above Average Yields per Sq. Footage - Anticipate 3 or more ears per Stalk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn has shallow roots, and uses a lot of nitrogen as well as trace elements. To help your crop get off to the best start possible, prepare the soil first with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. Well rotted manure or compost is also helpful.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant in the northern side of the garden as corn stalks will deny sunlight to the rest of your garden crops ,you also might want to grow some where it will provide shade to plants that can not tolerate full sunlight.</span></p> <div> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/peruvian-giant-red-sacsa-kuski-corn-seeds.html" target="_blank" title="Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE</strong></a></h2> </div> </body> </html>
P 40 5S NS
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco