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Item 1-12 van 169 in totaal item(s)
Society Garlic Seeds...

Society Garlic Seeds...

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: MHS 85
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Society Garlic Seeds (Tulbaghia violacea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for a Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Tulbaghia violacea</b></i>, also known as<span> </span><b>society garlic</b>, is a<span> </span>species<span> </span>of<span> </span>flowering plant<span> </span>in the<span> </span>family<span> </span>Amaryllidaceae,<span> </span>indigenous<span> </span>to southern Africa (KwaZulu-Natal<span> </span>and<span> </span>Cape Province), and reportedly naturalized in Tanzania and Mexico.<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Growing to 60 cm (24 in) tall by 25 cm (10 in) wide, it is a clump-forming<span> </span>perennial<span> </span>with narrow leaves and large clusters of fragrant, violet flowers from midsummer to autumn (fall).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>When grown as an ornamental, this plant requires some protection from winter frosts. This species<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>and the<span> </span>cultivars<span> </span>‘Purple Eye’<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>and ‘Silver Lace’, with cream-margined leaves,<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>have all gained the<span> </span>Royal Horticultural Society’s<span> </span>Award of Garden Merit.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Medicinal_uses">Medicinal uses</span></h2> <p><i>Tulbaghia violacea</i><span> </span>is used locally as a herbal remedy/medicine to treat several ailments. Recently it was demonstrated to have<span> </span>androgenic<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>and anti-cancer<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>properties in vitro.</p> <p><i>Tulbaghia violacea</i><span> </span>exhibited<span> </span>antithrombotic<span> </span>activities which were higher than those found in<span> </span>garlic.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Odor">Odor</span></h2> <p>It may smell like marijuana or skunk to those familiar with either smell.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>There have been instances in which concerned neighbors have contacted the authorities about the smell of cannabis in the neighborhood only to find out that the culprit was actually lemon verbena or society garlic.</p>
MHS 85 (10 S)
Society Garlic Seeds (Tulbaghia violacea)
Alba Aardbeienzaden

Alba Aardbeienzaden

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: V 1 A
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Alba Aardbeienzaden</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs per verpakking van 100 (0,06 g) zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="2" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$449"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Alba-aardbeien zijn erg groot, lang en uniform.</span></span><span> </span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="3" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$450"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">De vorm is aantrekkelijk, vruchtvlees erg stevig en helderrood.</span></span><span> </span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="4" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$451"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">De aardbeien hebben een goede geur en een uitstekende smaak.</span></span><span> </span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="5" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$452"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Alba-planten zijn erg sterk, ze zijn immuun voor bijna alle veel voorkomende ziekten.</span></span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="6" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$453"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb"> </span></span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="7" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$454"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">De planten hebben een goede, geconcentreerde rijpingsperiode.</span></span><span> </span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="8" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$455"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">De aardbeien zijn gemakkelijk te plukken.</span></span><span> </span></p> <p><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="9" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$456"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">De planten zijn vatbaar voor het herbicide.</span></span><span> </span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="nl" data-language-to-translate-into="auto" data-phrase-index="10" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$457"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">De vruchten kunnen al in mei worden geoogst.</span></span></p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/how-to-grow-strawberries-from-seed.html">How to Grow Strawberries from Seeds</a></strong></p> </body> </html>
V 1 A
Alba Aardbeienzaden
"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)

DUKE Blueberry Seeds...

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: V 194 D
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>DUKE Northern highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,015g) seeds. </strong></span></h2> <p>Duke blueberries are the leading early-ripening (berries begin ripening in early June) blueberry variety. It is known for its high yields (one Duke plant can produce over 9 kg (20 lbs) of uniform-sized, quality fruits. Duke’s mild flavor seems to improve with cold storage.</p> <p>Maintaining the plant vigor of Duke blueberries can be a challenge over a long period of time. Growers must choose a quality growing site and continually employ good cultural practices.</p> <p>The Duke blueberry is one of the leading candidates for mechanical harvest, fresh, and process sales.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Many wild species of Vaccinium are thought to have been cultivated by Native Americans for thousands of years, with intentional crop burnings in northeastern areas being apparent from archeological evidence.[9] V. corymbosum, being one of the species likely used by these peoples, was later studied and domesticated in 1908 by Frederick Vernon Coville.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>In natural habitats it is a food source for native and migrating birds, bears, and small mammals.</p> <p>The berries were collected and used in Native American cuisine in areas where Vaccinium corymbosum grew as a native plant.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Vaccinium corymbosum is the most common commercially grown blueberry in present-day North America. It is also cultivated as an ornamental plant for home and wildlife gardens and natural landscaping projects.</p> <h2><em><span style="color: #000000;"><strong>Germination instructions</strong></span></em></h2> <p>Northern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium Corymbosum) – Soak the seeds in a small container of hand hot water and leave to cool for 24 hours. Then sow the seeds on the surface of free-draining, damp, lime-free seed compost and only just cover with compost. 90 days cold stratification at approx 3C° is now required, which can be achieved by either, covering and placing outside in a cold shaded area, or by sealing the pot in a plastic bag and place in a refrigerator. Then move indoors or to a propagator at a minimum temperature of 21C°, until after germination. When large enough to handle, transplant individual seedlings into 9cm pots of ericaceous compost and grow on. Protect from frost. Plant outdoors from June onwards, after hardening off.</p> </body> </html>
V 194 D
"DUKE" Highbush Blueberry Seeds (Vaccinium Corymbosum)
Ashwagandha - Indian Ginseng Seeds (Withania Somnifera) 1.95 - 8

Ashwagandha - Indian...

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: MHS 61
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Ashwagandha - Indian Ginseng Seeds (Withania Somnifera)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.&nbsp;</strong></span></h2> <p>Withania somnifera, known commonly as ashwagandha, Indian ginseng, poison gooseberry, or winter cherry, is a plant in the Solanaceae or nightshade family. Several other species in the genus Withania are morphologically similar It is used as a herb in Ayurvedic medicine.</p> <p>This species is a short, tender perennial shrub growing 35–75 cm (14–30 in) tall. Tomentose branches extend radially from a central stem. Leaves are dull green, elliptic, usually up to 10–12 cm (4 to 5 in) long. The flowers are small, green and bell-shaped. The ripe fruit is orange-red.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Withania somnifera is cultivated in many of the drier regions of India, such as Mandsaur District of Madhya Pradesh, Punjab, Sindh, Gujarat,Kerala and Rajasthan. It is also found in Nepal, China and Yemen.</p> <p><strong>Pathology</strong></p> <p>Withania somnifera is prone to several pests and diseases. Leaf spot disease caused by Alternaria alternata is the most prevalent disease, which is most severe in the plains of Punjab, Haryana, and Himachal Pradesh. Biodeterioration of its pharmaceutically active components during leaf spot disease has been reported.[9] The Choanephora cucurbitarum causes a stem and leaf rot of Withania somnifera.[10] A treehopper feeds on the apical portions of the stem, making them rough and woody in appearance and brown in colour. The apical leaves are shed and the plant gradually dies.[11] The carmine red spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) is the most prevalent pest of the plant in India.</p> <p><strong>Culinary use</strong></p> <p>The berries can be used as a substitute for rennet in cheesemaking.</p> <p><strong>Biochemistry</strong></p> <p>The main chemical constituents are alkaloids and steroidal lactones. These include tropine and cuscohygrine. The leaves contain the steroidal lactones, withanolides, notably withaferin A, which was the first to be isolated from the plant.[citation needed] Tropine is a derivative of tropane containing a hydroxyl group at third carbon. It is also called 3-tropanol. Benzatropine and etybenzatropine are derivatives of tropine. It is also a building block of atropine, an anticholinergic drug prototypical of the muscarinic antagonist class. Cuscohygrine is a pyrrolidine alkaloid found in coca. It can also be extracted from plants of the family Solanaceae as well, including Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), Datura inoxia and Datura stramonium (jimson weed). Cuscohygrine usually comes with other, more potent alkaloids like atropine or cocaine. Cuscohygrine (along with the related metabolite hygrine) was first isolated by Carl Liebermann in 1889 as an alkaloid accompanying cocaine in coca leaves (also known as Cusco-leaves). Cuscohygrine is an oil that can be distilled without decomposition only in vacuum. It is soluble in water. It also forms a crystalline trihydrate, which melts at 40–41 °C. There are also the alkaloids ashwagandhine, ashwaganidhine, and somniferine, all of which have been identified exclusively in the ashwagandha plant itself.</p> <p><strong>Traditional medicinal uses</strong></p> <p>Bioactive constituent withaferin A has shown potential in therapy for glioblastomas, although this is not a traditional use of the plant. The plant's long, brown, tuberous roots are used in traditional medicine. In Ayurveda, the berries and leaves are applied externally to tumors, tubercular glands, carbuncles, and ulcers. The roots are used to prepare the herbal remedy ashwagandha. The traditional use is as a powder, mixed with warm milk and honey, and taken before bed. In Yemen, where it is known as ubab, the dried leaves are ground to a powder from which a paste is made and used in the treatment of burns and wounds.</p> <p>Ashwagandha root extract is a popular supplement, with purported benefits including reduction of anxiety and stress (potentially mediated by reducing cortisol levels) The extract is also thought to reduce total cholesterol levels, increase power output and muscle mass and has other, less significant effects. As a supplement, the lowest effective dose for acute use is 300–500 mg, with the optimum dose being 6000 mg per day in three 2000 mg doses, taken with each meal.</p> <p><strong>Common name:</strong>&nbsp;Ashwagandha&nbsp;<br><strong>Botanical name:</strong>&nbsp;Withania somnifera&nbsp;<br><strong>Type:</strong>&nbsp;Depending on your location, is either a woody evergreen shrub or herbaceous perennial.&nbsp;<br><strong>Scarification/Stratification:</strong>&nbsp;None needed.&nbsp;<br><strong>Self fertile:</strong>&nbsp;Yes&nbsp;<br><strong>Hardiness:</strong>&nbsp;Zones 8 to 11. Hardy to 15F but keep out of the snowy areas in winter. It doesn’t like to be cold AND wet.<br><strong>Sow temp/season:</strong>&nbsp;Early spring, indoors. Definitely get an early start.&nbsp;<br><strong>Sow depth:</strong>&nbsp;Sow 3/8 inch deep&nbsp;<br><strong>Germination time:</strong>&nbsp;14 to 21 days<br><strong>Final spacing:</strong>&nbsp;12 to 24 inches&nbsp;<br><strong>Final height/spread:</strong>&nbsp;2 to 3 feet tall and 12 to 24 inches wide&nbsp;<br><strong>pH range:</strong>&nbsp;7.5 – 8<br><strong>Soil type:</strong>&nbsp;Stony is best!<br><strong>Nutrition</strong>&nbsp;Moderate with some limestone for calcium.&nbsp;<br><strong>Drainage:</strong>&nbsp;Fast-draining&nbsp;<br><strong>Water requirement:</strong>&nbsp;Allow to dry between sparse waterings.&nbsp;<br><strong>Root type:</strong>&nbsp;Thick, tuber-like, extremely aromatic roots&nbsp;<br><strong>Companion plants:</strong>&nbsp;Best left by itself.&nbsp;<br><strong>Pest and disease resistance/susceptibility:</strong>&nbsp;Not particularly susceptible to pests or disease.&nbsp;<br><strong>Sun:</strong>&nbsp;Full sun to dappled sun.<br><strong>Time to maturity:</strong>&nbsp;100 days, but 200 days is ideal for harvesting the root.<br><strong>Hilling:</strong>&nbsp;None needed.&nbsp;<br><strong>Suckering:</strong>&nbsp;n/a&nbsp;<br><strong>Propagation:</strong>&nbsp;Seed&nbsp;<br><strong>Hybridization:</strong>&nbsp;Not a concern&nbsp;<br><strong>Uses:</strong>&nbsp;Aphrodisiac, low energy levels, and has a history of use for sedative, anti-diabetic, and a general tonic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 61 (10 S)
Ashwagandha - Indian Ginseng Seeds (Withania Somnifera) 1.95 - 8

Variety from Serbia
Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus avium) 1.45 - 5

Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: V 98
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus avium)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span><span><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;"><br></span></strong></span></h2> <p>Prunus avium, commonly called wild cherry, sweet cherry, bird cherry, or gean, is a species of cherry native to Europe, western Turkey, northwestern Africa, and western Asia, from the British Isles south to Morocco and Tunisia, north to the Trondheimsfjord region in Norway and east to the Caucasus and northern Iran, with a small disjunct population in the western Himalaya.[3][4] This species, in the rose family (Rosaceae), has a diploid set of sixteen chromosomes (2n=16).[5] All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.</p> <p><strong>Nomenclature</strong></p> <p>The early history of its classification is somewhat confused. In the first edition of Species Plantarum (1753), Linnaeus treated it as only a variety, Prunus cerasus var. avium, citing Gaspard Bauhin's Pinax theatri botanici (1596) as a synonym;[clarification needed] his description, Cerasus racemosa hortensis ("Cherry with racemes, of gardens")[clarification needed] shows it was described from a cultivated plant.[6] Linnaeus then changed from a variety to a species Prunus avium in the second edition of his Flora Suecica in 1755.[7]</p> <p>Sweet cherry was known historically as Gean or Mazzard (also 'massard'), until recently, both were largely obsolete names in modern English.</p> <p>The name "wild cherry" is also commonly applied to other species of Prunus growing in their native habitats, particularly to the North American species Prunus serotina.</p> <p>Prunus avium means "bird cherry" in the Latin language.[4] In English "bird cherry" often refers to Prunus padus.</p> <p><strong>Mazzard</strong></p> <p>More recently[when?] 'Mazzard' has been used to refer to a selected self-fertile cultivar that comes true from seed, and which is used as a seedling rootstock for fruiting cultivars.[9][10] This term is still used particularly for the varieties of P. avium grown in North Devon and cultivated there, particularly in the orchards at Landkey.</p> <p><strong>Description and ecology</strong></p> <p>Prunus avium is a deciduous tree growing to 15–32 m (50-100 ft) tall, with a trunk up to 1.5 m (5 ft) in diameter. Young trees show strong apical dominance with a straight trunk and symmetrical conical crown, becoming rounded to irregular on old trees. The bark is smooth purplish-brown with prominent horizontal grey-brown lenticels on young trees, becoming thick dark blackish-brown and fissured on old trees. The leaves are alternate, simple ovoid-acute, 7–14 cm (3–6 in) long and 4–7 cm (2–3 in) broad, glabrous matt or sub-shiny green above, variably finely downy beneath, with a serrated margin and an acuminate tip, with a green or reddish petiole 2–3.5 cm (0.8-1.4 in) long bearing two to five small red glands. The tip of each serrated edge of the leaves also bear small red glands.[11] In autumn, the leaves turn orange, pink or red before falling. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as the new leaves, borne in corymbs of two to six together, each flower pendent on a 2–5 cm (0.8-2 in) peduncle, 2.5–3.5 cm (1-1.4 in) in diameter, with five pure white petals, yellowish stamens, and a superior ovary; they are hermaphroditic, and pollinated by bees. The fruit is a drupe 1–2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) in diameter (larger in some cultivated selections), bright red to dark purple when mature in midsummer, edible, variably sweet to somewhat astringent and bitter to eat fresh. Each fruit contains a single hard-shelled stone 8–12 mm long, 7–10 mm wide and 6–8 mm thick, grooved along the flattest edge; the seed (kernel) inside the stone is 6–8 mm long.</p> <p>The fruit are readily eaten by numerous kinds of birds and mammals, which digest the fruit flesh and disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some rodents, and a few birds (notably the Hawfinch), also crack open the stones to eat the kernel inside. All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.</p> <p>See also List of Lepidoptera that feed on Prunus</p> <p>The leaves provide food for some animals, including Lepidoptera such as the case-bearer moth Coleophora anatipennella.</p> <p>The tree exudes a gum from wounds in the bark, by which it seals the wounds to exclude insects and fungal infections.</p> <p><strong>Fruit</strong></p> <p>Some eighteenth and nineteenth century botanical authors[who?] assumed a western Asia origin for the species based on the writings of Pliny; however, archaeological finds of seeds from prehistoric Europe contradict this view. Wild cherries have been an item of human food for several thousands of years. The stones have been found in deposits at Bronze Age settlements throughout Europe, including in Britain.[9] In one dated example, wild cherry macrofossils were found in a core sample from the detritus beneath a dwelling at an Early and Middle Bronze Age pile-dwelling site on and in the shore of a former lake at Desenzano del Garda or Lonato, near the southern shore of Lake Garda, Italy. The date is estimated at Early Bronze Age IA, carbon dated there to 2077 BC plus or minus 10 years. The natural forest was largely cleared at that time.[16]</p> <p>By 800 BC, cherries were being actively cultivated in Asia Minor, and soon after in Greece.[9]</p> <p>As the main ancestor of the cultivated cherry, the sweet cherry is one of the two cherry species which supply most of the world's commercial cultivars of edible cherry (the other is the sour cherry Prunus cerasus, mainly used for cooking; a few other species have had a very small input).[9] Various cherry cultivars are now grown worldwide wherever the climate is suitable; the number of cultivars is now very large.[9] The species has also escaped from cultivation and become naturalised in some temperate regions, including southwestern Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the northeast and northwest of the United States.</p> <p><strong>Ornamental</strong></p> <p>It is often cultivated as a flowering tree. Because of the size of the tree, it is often used in parkland, and less often as a street or garden tree. The double-flowered form, 'Plena', is commonly found, rather than the wild single-flowered forms.</p> <p>Two interspecific hybrids, P. x schmittii (P. avium x P. canescens) and P. x fontenesiana (P. avium x P. mahaleb) are also grown as ornamental trees.</p> <p><strong>Timber</strong></p> <p>The hard, reddish-brown wood (cherry wood) is valued as a hardwood for woodturning, and making cabinets and musical instruments.[15] Cherry wood is also used for smoking foods, particularly meats, in North America, as it lends a distinct and pleasant flavor to the product.[citation needed]</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>The gum from bark wounds is aromatic and can be chewed as a substitute for chewing gum.</p> <p>Medicine can be prepared from the stalks of the drupes that is astringent, antitussive, and diuretic.</p> <p>A green dye can also be prepared from the plant.</p> <p><strong>Contribution to other species</strong></p> <p>Prunus avium is thought to be one of the parent species of Prunus cerasus (sour cherry) by way of ancient crosses between it and Prunus fruticosa (dwarf cherry) in the areas where the two species overlap. All three species can breed with each other. Prunus cerasus is now a species in its own right having developed beyond a hybrid and stabilised.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 98 (2g)
Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus avium) 1.45 - 5

Deze plant heeft gigantische vruchten
Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds...

Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds...

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: V 98 G
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus avium)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>The fruits are 3 times bigger than any other Sweet Cherry!</b></p> <p>Prunus avium, commonly called wild cherry,[1] sweet cherry,[1] bird cherry,[1] or gean,[1] is a species of cherry native to Europe, western Turkey, northwestern Africa, and western Asia, from the British Isles[2] south to Morocco and Tunisia, north to the Trondheimsfjord region in Norway and east to the Caucasus and northern Iran, with a small disjunct population in the western Himalaya.[3][4] This species, in the rose family (Rosaceae), has a diploid set of sixteen chromosomes (2n=16).[5] All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.</p> <p><strong>Nomenclature</strong></p> <p>The early history of its classification is somewhat confused. In the first edition of Species Plantarum (1753), Linnaeus treated it as only a variety, Prunus cerasus var. avium, citing Gaspard Bauhin's Pinax theatri botanici (1596) as a synonym;[clarification needed] his description, Cerasus racemosa hortensis ("Cherry with racemes, of gardens")[clarification needed] shows it was described from a cultivated plant.[6] Linnaeus then changed from a variety to a species Prunus avium in the second edition of his Flora Suecica in 1755.[7]</p> <p>Sweet cherry was known historically as Gean or Mazzard (also 'massard'), until recently, both were largely obsolete names in modern English.</p> <p>The name "wild cherry" is also commonly applied to other species of Prunus growing in their native habitats, particularly to the North American species Prunus serotina.</p> <p>Prunus avium means "bird cherry" in the Latin language.[4] In English "bird cherry" often refers to Prunus padus.</p> <p><strong>Mazzard</strong></p> <p>More recently[when?] 'Mazzard' has been used to refer to a selected self-fertile cultivar that comes true from seed, and which is used as a seedling rootstock for fruiting cultivars.[9][10] This term is still used particularly for the varieties of P. avium grown in North Devon and cultivated there, particularly in the orchards at Landkey.</p> <p><strong>Description and ecology</strong></p> <p>Prunus avium is a deciduous tree growing to 15–32 m (50-100 ft) tall, with a trunk up to 1.5 m (5 ft) in diameter. Young trees show strong apical dominance with a straight trunk and symmetrical conical crown, becoming rounded to irregular on old trees. The bark is smooth purplish-brown with prominent horizontal grey-brown lenticels on young trees, becoming thick dark blackish-brown and fissured on old trees. The leaves are alternate, simple ovoid-acute, 7–14 cm (3–6 in) long and 4–7 cm (2–3 in) broad, glabrous matt or sub-shiny green above, variably finely downy beneath, with a serrated margin and an acuminate tip, with a green or reddish petiole 2–3.5 cm (0.8-1.4 in) long bearing two to five small red glands. The tip of each serrated edge of the leaves also bear small red glands.[11] In autumn, the leaves turn orange, pink or red before falling. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as the new leaves, borne in corymbs of two to six together, each flower pendent on a 2–5 cm (0.8-2 in) peduncle, 2.5–3.5 cm (1-1.4 in) in diameter, with five pure white petals, yellowish stamens, and a superior ovary; they are hermaphroditic, and pollinated by bees. The fruit is a drupe 1–2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) in diameter (larger in some cultivated selections), bright red to dark purple when mature in midsummer, edible, variably sweet to somewhat astringent and bitter to eat fresh. Each fruit contains a single hard-shelled stone 8–12 mm long, 7–10 mm wide and 6–8 mm thick, grooved along the flattest edge; the seed (kernel) inside the stone is 6–8 mm long.</p> <p>The fruit are readily eaten by numerous kinds of birds and mammals, which digest the fruit flesh and disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some rodents, and a few birds (notably the Hawfinch), also crack open the stones to eat the kernel inside. All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.</p> <p>See also List of Lepidoptera that feed on Prunus</p> <p>The leaves provide food for some animals, including Lepidoptera such as the case-bearer moth Coleophora anatipennella.</p> <p>The tree exudes a gum from wounds in the bark, by which it seals the wounds to exclude insects and fungal infections.</p> <p><strong>Fruit</strong></p> <p>Some eighteenth and nineteenth century botanical authors[who?] assumed a western Asia origin for the species based on the writings of Pliny; however, archaeological finds of seeds from prehistoric Europe contradict this view. Wild cherries have been an item of human food for several thousands of years. The stones have been found in deposits at Bronze Age settlements throughout Europe, including in Britain.[9] In one dated example, wild cherry macrofossils were found in a core sample from the detritus beneath a dwelling at an Early and Middle Bronze Age pile-dwelling site on and in the shore of a former lake at Desenzano del Garda or Lonato, near the southern shore of Lake Garda, Italy. The date is estimated at Early Bronze Age IA, carbon dated there to 2077 BC plus or minus 10 years. The natural forest was largely cleared at that time.[16]</p> <p>By 800 BC, cherries were being actively cultivated in Asia Minor, and soon after in Greece.[9]</p> <p>As the main ancestor of the cultivated cherry, the sweet cherry is one of the two cherry species which supply most of the world's commercial cultivars of edible cherry (the other is the sour cherry Prunus cerasus, mainly used for cooking; a few other species have had a very small input).[9] Various cherry cultivars are now grown worldwide wherever the climate is suitable; the number of cultivars is now very large.[9] The species has also escaped from cultivation and become naturalised in some temperate regions, including southwestern Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the northeast and northwest of the United States.</p> <p><strong>Ornamental</strong></p> <p>It is often cultivated as a flowering tree. Because of the size of the tree, it is often used in parkland, and less often as a street or garden tree. The double-flowered form, 'Plena', is commonly found, rather than the wild single-flowered forms.</p> <p>Two interspecific hybrids, P. x schmittii (P. avium x P. canescens) and P. x fontenesiana (P. avium x P. mahaleb) are also grown as ornamental trees.</p> <p><strong>Timber</strong></p> <p>The hard, reddish-brown wood (cherry wood) is valued as a hardwood for woodturning, and making cabinets and musical instruments.[15] Cherry wood is also used for smoking foods, particularly meats, in North America, as it lends a distinct and pleasant flavor to the product.[citation needed]</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>The gum from bark wounds is aromatic and can be chewed as a substitute for chewing gum.</p> <p>Medicine can be prepared from the stalks of the drupes that is astringent, antitussive, and diuretic.</p> <p>A green dye can also be prepared from the plant.</p> <p><strong>Contribution to other species</strong></p> <p>Prunus avium is thought to be one of the parent species of Prunus cerasus (sour cherry) by way of ancient crosses between it and Prunus fruticosa (dwarf cherry) in the areas where the two species overlap. All three species can breed with each other. Prunus cerasus is now a species in its own right having developed beyond a hybrid and stabilised.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 98 G (3,5g)
Giant Sweet Cherry Seeds (Prunus avium)

Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus...

Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus...

Prijs € 3,85 SKU: V 100 RC
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f70606;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Rubus chamaemorus</b></i><span> </span>is a<span> </span>species<span> </span>of<span> </span>flowering plant<span> </span>in the rose<span> </span>family<span> </span>Rosaceae, native to cool<span> </span>temperate<span> </span>regions,<span> </span>alpine<span> </span>and<span> </span>arctic tundra<span> </span>and<span> </span>boreal forest.<span> </span>This<span> </span>herbaceous<span> </span>perennial<span> </span>produces amber-colored edible fruit similar to the<span> </span>blackberry. English common names include<span> </span><b>cloudberry</b>,<span> </span><b>nordic berry</b>,<span> </span><b>bakeapple</b><span> </span>(in<span> </span>Newfoundland and Labrador),<span> </span><b>knotberry</b><span> </span>and<span> </span><b>knoutberry</b><span> </span>(in England),<span> </span><b>aqpik</b><span> </span>or<span> </span><b>low-bush salmonberry</b><span> </span>(in<span> </span>Alaska<span> </span>– not to be confused with salmonberry,<span> </span><i>Rubus spectabilis</i>),<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>and<span> </span><b>averin</b><span> </span>or<span> </span><b>evron</b><span> </span>(in<span> </span>Scotland).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg/230px-Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="307" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg/345px-Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1c/Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg/460px-Rubus_chamaemorus_LC0151.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1600" data-file-height="2133" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Male flower</div> </div> </div> <p>Unlike most<span> </span><i>Rubus</i><span> </span>species, the cloudberry is<span> </span>dioecious, and fruit production by a female plant requires pollination from a male plant.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>The cloudberry grows to 10–25 cm (4–10 in) high.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-2" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>The<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>alternate between having 5 and 7 soft, handlike lobes on straight, branchless stalks. After pollination, the white (sometimes reddish-tipped)<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>form raspberry-sized<span> </span>aggregate fruits<span> </span>which are more plentiful in wooded rather than sun-exposed habitats.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-3" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Consisting of between 5 and 25<span> </span>drupelets, each fruit is initially pale red, ripening into an amber color in early autumn.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Distribution_and_ecology">Distribution and ecology</span></h2> <p>In North America, cloudberries grow wild across Greenland, most of northern Canada, Alaska, northern Minnesota, New Hampshire, Maine, and New York.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-8" class="reference">[1]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup>Cloudberries are a circumpolar boreal plant, occurring naturally throughout the<span> </span>Northern Hemisphere<span> </span>from 78°N, south to about 55°N, and are scattered south to 44°N mainly in mountainous areas and<span> </span>moorlands.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-4" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>In Europe, they grow in the<span> </span>Nordic countries,<span> </span>Baltic states<span> </span>and particularly in<span> </span>Poland.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-5" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>They occur across northern<span> </span>Russia<span> </span>east towards the<span> </span>Pacific Ocean<span> </span>as far south as<span> </span>Japan.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-6" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Due to peatland drainage and<span> </span>peat<span> </span>exploitation, they are considered<span> </span>endangered<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-7" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>and are under legal protection in Germany's<span> </span>Weser<span> </span>and<span> </span>Elbe<span> </span>valleys, and at isolated sites in the English<span> </span>Pennines<span> </span>and<span> </span>Scottish Highlands. A single, fragile site exists in the<span> </span>Sperrin Mountains<span> </span>of<span> </span>Northern Ireland.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <p>Wide distribution occurs due to the excretion of the indigestible seeds by birds and mammals. Further distribution arises through its<span> </span>rhizomes, which are up to 10 m (33 ft) long and grow about 10–15 cm (3.9–5.9 in) below the soil surface, developing extensive and dense berry patches.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-9" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Cuttings of these taken in May or August are successful in producing a genetic<span> </span>clone<span> </span>of the parent plant.<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>The cloudberry grows in<span> </span>bogs,<span> </span>marshes,<span> </span>wet meadows,<span> </span>tundra<span> </span>and altitudes of 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) above sea level in Norway, requiring acidic ground (between 3.5 and 5<span> </span><i>p</i>H).<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-10" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>Cloudberry leaves are food for<span> </span>caterpillars<span> </span>of several<span> </span>Lepidoptera<span> </span>species. The<span> </span>moth<span> </span><i>Coleophora thulea</i><span> </span>has no other known food plants. See also<span> </span>List of Lepidoptera that feed on Rubus.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Cloudberries.jpg/230px-Cloudberries.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="154" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Cloudberries.jpg/345px-Cloudberries.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Cloudberries.jpg/460px-Cloudberries.jpg 2x" data-file-width="1448" data-file-height="972" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe cloudberries</div> </div> </div> <p>Despite great demand as a delicacy (particularly in Sweden, Norway and Finland) the cloudberry is not widely cultivated and is primarily a wild plant. Wholesale prices vary widely based on the size of the yearly harvest, but cloudberries have gone for as much as €10/kg (in 2004).<sup id="cite_ref-bloomberg-Heiskanen-&amp;-Erkheikki_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <p>Since the middle of the 1990s, however, the species has formed part of a multinational research project. Beginning in 2002, selected<span> </span>cultivars<span> </span>have been available to farmers, notably 'Apolto' (male), 'Fjellgull' (female) and 'Fjordgull' (female). The cloudberry can be cultivated in Arctic areas where few other crops are possible, for example along the northern coast of<span> </span>Norway.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg/230px-Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="211" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg/345px-Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg/460px-Chamaemorus_fruit.jpg 2x" data-file-width="599" data-file-height="549" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Unripe cloudberry</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg/230px-Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg" decoding="async" width="230" height="154" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg/345px-Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg/460px-Homemade_cloudberry_jam.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2618" data-file-height="1752" title="Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Cloudberry jam</div> </div> </div> <p>The ripe fruits are golden-yellow, soft and juicy, and are rich in<span> </span>vitamin C.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-11" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>When eaten fresh, cloudberries have a distinctive tart taste. When over-ripe, they have a creamy texture somewhat like yogurt and a sweetened flavor. They are often made into<span> </span>jams,<span> </span>juices, tarts, and liqueurs. In Finland, the berries are eaten with heated<span> </span><i>leipäjuusto</i><span> </span>(a local cheese; the name translates to "bread-cheese"), as well as<span> </span>cream<span> </span>and<span> </span>sugar. In Sweden, cloudberries (<i>hjortron</i>) and cloudberry jam are used as a topping for ice cream, pancakes, and waffles. In Norway, they are often mixed with<span> </span>whipped cream<span> </span>and sugar to be served as a dessert called<span> </span><i>multekrem</i><span> </span>(cloudberry cream), as a jam or as an ingredient in homemade ice cream. Cloudberry yoghurt—<i>molte-</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>multeyoughurt</i>—is a supermarket item in<span> </span>Norway.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>In<span> </span>Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, cloudberries are used to make "bakeapple pie" or jam.<span> </span>Arctic<span> </span>Yup'ik<span> </span>mix the berries with<span> </span>seal<span> </span>oil,<span> </span>reindeer<span> </span>or<span> </span>caribou<span> </span>fat (which is diced and made fluffy with seal oil) and sugar to make "Eskimo<span> </span>ice cream" or<span> </span>akutaq.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-12" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>The recipes vary by region. Along the<span> </span>Yukon<span> </span>and<span> </span>Kuskokwim River<span> </span>areas, white fish (pike) along with shortening and sugar are used. The berries are an important traditional food resource for the Yup'ik.</p> <p>Due to its high vitamin C content,<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-13" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>the berry is valued both by<span> </span>Nordic<span> </span>seafarers and Northern<span> </span>indigenous peoples. Its<span> </span>polyphenol<span> </span>content, including<span> </span>flavonoid<span> </span>compounds such as<span> </span>ellagic acid, appears to naturally preserve food preparations of the berries.<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-14" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Cloudberries can be preserved in their own juice without added sugar, if stored cool.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup></p> <p>Extract of cloudberries is also used in cosmetics such as shower gels, hand creams and body lotions.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Alcoholic_drinks">Alcoholic drinks</span></h3> <p>In<span> </span>Nordic countries, traditional<span> </span>liqueurs<span> </span>such as<span> </span><i>lakkalikööri</i><span> </span>(Finland) are made of cloudberry, having a strong taste and high sugar content. Cloudberry is used as a flavouring for making<span> </span>akvavit. In northeastern<span> </span>Quebec, a cloudberry liqueur known as<span> </span><i>chicoutai</i><span> </span>(aboriginal<span> </span>name) is made.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrients_and_phytochemicals">Nutrients and phytochemicals</span></h2> <p>Cloudberries are rich in<span> </span>vitamin C<span> </span>and<span> </span>ellagic acid,<sup id="cite_ref-thiem_1-15" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>citric acid,<span> </span>malic acid,<span> </span>α-tocopherol,<span> </span>anthocyanins<span> </span>and the<span> </span>provitamin A<span> </span>carotenoid,<span> </span>β-carotene<span> </span>in contents which differ across regions of Finland due to sunlight exposure, rainfall or temperature.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>The<span> </span>ellagitannins<span> </span>lambertianin C<span> </span>and<span> </span>sanguiin H-6<span> </span>are also present.<sup id="cite_ref-Kahkonen_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>Genotype<span> </span>of cloudberry variants may also affect<span> </span>polyphenol<span> </span>composition, particularly for ellagitannins, sanguiin H-6, anthocyanins and<span> </span>quercetin.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Polyphenol extracts from cloudberries have improved storage properties when<span> </span>microencapsulated<span> </span>using<span> </span>maltodextrin<span> </span>DE5-8.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><span> </span>At least 14<span> </span>volatile<span> </span>compounds, including<span> </span>vanillin, account for the<span> </span>aroma<span> </span>of cloudberries.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultural_references">Cultural references</span></h2> <p>The cloudberry appears on the<span> </span>Finnish<span> </span>version of the<span> </span>2 euro coin.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><span> </span>The name of the hill<span> </span><i>Beinn nan Oighreag</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Breadalbane<span> </span>in the<span> </span>Scottish Highlands<span> </span>means "Hill of the Cloudberries" in<span> </span>Scottish Gaelic.<sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Harvesting_on_public_property">Harvesting on public property</span></h2> <p>In some<span> </span>northern European<span> </span>countries such as<span> </span>Norway, a common use policy to non-wood forest products allows anyone to pick cloudberries on public property and eat them on location, but only local residents may transport them from that location and only ripe berries may be picked.<sup id="cite_ref-berryFAO_18-0" class="reference">[18]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup><span> </span>Since 1970 in Norway, while it has been illegal to pick unripe cloudberries, transporting ripe cloudberries from the harvest location is permitted in many counties.</p>
V 100 RC (5 S)
Cloudberry Seeds (Rubus chamaemorus)
Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds 1.95 - 5

Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: T 14 T
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds (Empress, Foxglove Tree)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 25 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Paulownia tormentosa is known by many names; regardless of what you want to call it, there is no doubt about its impressive ornamental features. This beautiful tree puts on an awe inspiring show in spring. Its soft chamois velvet buds open into large violet to blue, trumpet-like blossoms which fill the air with a sweet fragrance. The flowers carried on long up curved shoots, look like large foxgloves.</p> <p>The huge leaves are an architectural delight: the soft, downy, large leaves appear after the flowers have opened.</p> <p>Native to eastern Asia, this exotic looking, deciduous tree is surprisingly hardy and can tolerate harsh winters, to - 8*C (-14*F). Hardy throughout the British Isles, the buds of the Foxglove-like flowers are formed in the autumn and can be damaged by late frosts. They must be sheltered from hard frosts to ensure the violet blooms appear in spring.</p> <div> <div>It is a fast growing tree, usually grown as a specimen or shade tree. Growing rapidly (to 6f)t in it first year. In 3-5 years, this tree achieves what many other tree species take generations to achieve. An excellent use of this plant is the production of "stooled" specimens giving perhaps the most magnificent of all foliage dot plants. All growth is cut down to ground level each March and the resultant suckers reduced to a single shoot. The result is a strong, erect growth rising to 10 ft. and bearing huge and handsome leaves, producing a most striking effect. In very cold zones they are often grown and cut to near ground level in autumn and grown as a large-leafed shrub the following season.</div> <div>Very easy to germinate, seedlings grow rapidly, flowering in as little as 2-3 years under good growing conditions.</div> <div>It has been awarded the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit.</div> <div>Named after the Princess of the Dutch region, Anna Paulowna, who died in 1865. It has never been found in the wild although it undoubtedly originated in China where an old custom is to plant an Empress Tree when a baby girl is born. The fast-growing tree matures as she does. When she is eligible for marriage the tree is cut down and carved into wooden articles for her dowry. Carving the wood of Paulownia is an art form in Japan and China.</div> <div>Sowing: </div> <div>Sow September to May</div> <div>The seeds are very small so sow as thinly as possible to avoid crowding which leave seedlings more susceptible to damping off. Place the seeds on the surface of a tray containing well drained compost. Do not cover the seeds as light is required for germination.</div> <div>Stand the tray in water to soak and either cover with a plastic dome or place the tray into a plastic bag. Temperatures should ideally not exceed 30*C (85*F) during the daytime and not below 18*C (60*F) at night. Always keep the soil mixture moist (not soaked) during the germination process. The seeds will germinate in 30 – 60 days and grow rapidly when conditions are favourable.</div> <div>Growing: </div> <div>After germination, remove the cover or bag. When seedlings are big enough to handle (about 2-3 weeks), carefully transfer to pots. Grow on until they are strong enough to plant into their permanent positions. Harden off before planting out (after the last expected frosts).</div> <div>Aftercare: </div> <div>Pruning should be done in autumn after leaf drop. prune down to where an axillary bud can take over as the single leader. Coppicing a tree annually sacrifices the flowers but produces 3m (10ft) stems with enormous leaves up to 60cm (2ft) across.</div> <div>Plant Uses: </div> <div>A specimen tree, shade tree, or focal point.</div> <span style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 1.5em;">Fully hardy to -25°C.</span></div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Light germinator! Only sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + slightly press on</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">22-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">4-6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
T 14 T
Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds 1.95 - 5
Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii Cider Gum Tree 2.5 - 5

Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii...

Prijs € 2,50 SKU: T 7
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii Cider Gum Tree</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>The magnificent Eucalyptus gunnii is one of the most popular hardy varieties of eucalyptus, which thrives in our climate. With silvery-blue, rounded young leaves that give way to long, glaucous, sickle-shaped adult foliage and smooth whitish-green bark that is shed annually in late summer to reveal greyish-green bark, sometimes flushed pink or orange. Although not often seen in the UK, it can bear beautiful creamy-white blooms when it flowers in summer.</div> <div>Eucalyptus are naturally trees, sometimes reaching a great height, but in gardens regular firm annual pruning can keep them as large shrubs and maintain a supply of the juvenile foliage enjoyed by gardeners and flower arrangers. Ideal in a pot on the patio, it can be grown to form a standard tree and clipped regularly for a compact head of silver-blue foliage which produce a scented natural oil that will keep bugs and knats at bay.</div> <div>This magnificent evergreen, fast growing specimen can grow up to 1m (36in) in the first year and once established, are hardy to -18°C  (0°F). Easy to care for, it requires minimum attention.</div> <div>Awarded the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit (AGM).</div> <div>Sowing:</div> <div>Germination: Indoors, lightly Cover with uncompacted soil Water well. Keep in a sunny position.</div> <div>Contains seeds(black) and growth medium(brown).Use mixture: DON’T separate out seeds.</div> <div>Sowing into containers:</div> <div>Germination: Indoors, lightly Cover with uncompacted soil Water well. Keep in a sunny position.</div> <div>Contains seeds(black) and growth medium(brown).Use mixture: DON’T separate out seeds.</div> <div>, well drained and sterile compost. (John Innes or 50% multi-purpose and 50% perlite or coarse grit.). Cover with sieved compost or vermiculite. Provide bottom heat if possible. and cover pots with plastic or glass to retain moisture and humidity and protect the seed. Keep moist at all times.</div> <div>When large enough to handle, transplant/prick out each seedling in its own pot of multi-purpose compost. Seedlings in shallow seed trays need transplanting promptly, handling them carefully by holding the seed leaves, rather than the emerging true adult leaves. Seedlings in root trainers can be left a little longer before transplanting, allowing their roots to fill the module, and then transplanting the whole plug of roots and compost in one go.</div> <div>Cultivation:</div> <div>Water regularly, as needed, and feed with liquid fertiliser every month, growing the seedlings on into small plants. The following spring or summer, when the plants are more robust, harden off for 10-14 days before planting out.</div> <div>Plant them out into the garden in late summer to early autumn, giving them the winter to settle their roots into the soil before coming into active growth the following spring. Best grown in sunny sheltered spots. Cold winds are more injurious than frost.</div> <div>Planting guide:</div> <div>Water pot thoroughly and allow to drain. If planting in a lawn, remove a circle of turf 60cm (24in) across. Dig a hole twice the size of the pot and fork over the base, incorporating a handful of general fertiliser and a bucketful of planting compost. Drive in a tree stake a little off-centre. Remove the pot and tease out any matted roots. Position the tree against stake with top of root ball level with surrounding soil. Replace remaining soil, firming-in well. Secure tree to stake with adjustable strap. Water thoroughly, then once a week during the first growing season and during dry spells while the tree is establishing. Garden-grown specimens should not require regular feeding.</div> <div>Container Specimens:</div> <div>Grow in any good multi-purpose potting media or soil-based ones such as John Innes No 2 or No 3. Adding up to 30 percent by volume of coarse grit is often helpful. They benefit from monthly feeding with a balanced liquid fertiliser. Keep the compost moist during the growing season and reduce watering in winter. Repot every two years.</div> <div>Pruning:</div> <div>Requires minimal pruning if grown as a tree, removing any broken, diseased or crossing branches in late autumn or winter. For the best juvenile foliage, prune in early spring cutting back the stems to two or three buds above the base.</div> <div>Plant uses:</div> <div>Containers, Flower Arranging, Architectural, Sub-Tropical, Foliage Specimen.</div> <div>Other Uses:</div> <div>When crushed, the leaves produce a scented natural oil which is often used for cleaning and as a natural insecticide. Natural Dyes from the leaves &amp; bark can give pretty colours, usually ranging from tan &amp; yellow through to rust &amp; red. It is also used for producing paper.</div> <div>Nomenclature:</div> <div>Eucalyptus (From Greek, meaning "well covered") is a diverse genus of trees (and a few shrubs), the members of which dominate the tree flora of Australia.</div> <div> <p>There are more than seven hundred species of Eucalyptus, mostly native to Australia, with a very small number found in adjacent parts of New Guinea and Indonesia and one as far north as the Philippines islands.</p> </div> <div>Many, but far from all, are known as gum trees in reference to the habit of many species to exude copious sap from any break in the bark (e.g. Scribbly Gum).</div> <div>Flowers:           July to October, white to cream, (not often seen in the UK)</div> <div>Foliage:           Fragrant, elliptic, grey-green horizontal branches</div> <div>Height:             15-20m (15-20ft) if unpruned in 15-20 years. Broadly conical.</div> <div>Spread:            8-12m (12-15ft) if unpruned in 15-20 years</div> <div>Soil type:         Prefers neutral to slightly acidic soil that doesn't dry out</div> <div>Position:          Full sun to part shade</div> </body> </html>
T 7
Seeds Eucalyptus Gunnii Cider Gum Tree 2.5 - 5
Jostaberry Seeds (Ribes ×...

Jostaberry Seeds (Ribes ×...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: V 146
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Jostaberry Seeds (Ribes × nidigrolaria)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f70606;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The<span> </span><b>jostaberry</b><span> </span>(<i>Ribes</i><span> </span>×<span> </span><i>nidigrolaria</i>) is a complex-cross fruit bush in the genus<span> </span><i>Ribes</i>, involving three original species, the black currant<span> </span><i>R. nigrum</i>, the North American coastal black gooseberry<span> </span><i>R. divaricatum</i>, and the European gooseberry<span> </span><i>R. uva-crispa</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>It is similar to<span> </span><i>Ribes × culverwellii</i>, the Jochelbeere, which is descended from just two of these species,<span> </span><i>R. nigrum</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>R. uva-crispa</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Taxonomy">Taxonomy</span></h2> <p>There was a demand to have gooseberry-type fruits on thornless plants, and the first successful attempt to cross blackcurrant (<i>R. nigrum</i>) with European gooseberry (<i>R. uva-crispa</i>) was carried out by Culverwell<sup class="noprint Inline-Template">[<i><span title="The text near this tag may need clarification or removal of jargon. (June 2020)">clarification needed</span></i>]</sup><span> </span>in Yorkshire, England in 1880.<sup id="cite_ref-Barney2005_3-0" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>This hybrid was termed<span> </span><i>Ribes × culverwellii</i><span> </span>and was nearly sterile.<sup id="cite_ref-Lim2012_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Others later carried out direct crosses between blackcurrant and gooseberry, however the<span> </span>diploid<span> </span>seedlings created were sterile and did not produce much fruit, although some fruit was set without fertilization (parthenocarpy).</p> <p>Jostaberry is frequently mistakenly termed<span> </span><i>Ribes × culverwelli</i><span> </span>as a result of this early F1 diploid hybrid.<sup id="cite_ref-Lim2012_4-1" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>However, Jostaberry is a F2 fertile amphipolyploid hybrid of complex parentage, not a direct cross, and was created later in Germany.<sup id="cite_ref-Lim2012_4-2" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Paul Lorenz started the process in the<span> </span>Kaiser Wilhelm Institute<span> </span>in Berlin in 1926. In 13 years, over 1000 F1 hybrids were created. Only eight of these survived World War II, and were eventually moved to the Erwin Baeur Institute, which was founded in 1946.<sup id="cite_ref-Barney2005_3-2" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>Randolph Baeur used<span> </span>colchicine<span> </span>to double the number of<span> </span>chromosomes<span> </span>and produce fertile<span> </span>tetraploids.<sup id="cite_ref-Bauer_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Barney2005_3-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>Backcrossing with gooseberry and blackcurrant parents was also involved, creating a new F2 generation. Of 15,000 such crosses, three seedlings were selected based on vigor, disease resistance and fertility.<sup id="cite_ref-Barney2005_3-4" class="reference">[3]</sup></p> <p>Therefore, jostaberry is descended from two separate first-generation crosses, both of which produced very few fruit.<sup id="cite_ref-Bauer_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>One of the F1 hybrids used was a cross between the blackcurrant cultivar<span> </span><i>R. nigrum</i><span> </span>‘Langtraubige Schwarze’ (‘Long Bunch’) with<span> </span><i>R. divaricatum</i><span> </span>(also termed spreading gooseberry, Worcesterberry, coastal black gooseberry or by other names). This F1 hybrid was resitant to American gooseberry mildew. The other F1 hybrid parent was a cross between the blackcurrant cultivar<span> </span><i>R. nigrum</i><span> </span>"Silvergieters Schwarze" with<span> </span><i>R. grossularia</i><span> </span>(syn.<span> </span><i>R. uva-crispa</i>) ‘Grune Hansa’.<sup id="cite_ref-Barney2005_3-5" class="reference">[3]</sup></p> <p>The name<span> </span><i>Jostaberry</i><span> </span>was created by combining the German words for blackcurrant and gooseberry, namely<span> </span><i>Johannisbeere</i><span> </span>("Jo") and<span> </span><i>Stachelbeere</i><span> </span>("Sta"). Following German pronunciation of "J", it may be pronounced "yostaberry" in English.</p> <p>The first cultivar, ‘Josta’ was made available to the public in 1977. Two later cultivars released were called ‘Jostine’ and ‘Jogranda’.<sup id="cite_ref-Barney2005_3-6" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>A number of varieties have been developed since then by various developers. Named cultivars tend to only be available in Germany,<sup id="cite_ref-Crawford2016_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>and the names of the three most common jostaberry cultivars have also been confused, and all have sometimes been sold as ‘Josta’.<sup id="cite_ref-Barney2005_3-7" class="reference">[3]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p>The nearly black<span> </span>berry, which is smaller than a gooseberry and a bit larger than a blackcurrant, is edible both raw and cooked. It is described as having a taste intermediate between a gooseberry and a blackcurrant, with the gooseberry flavor more dominant in the unripe fruit, and the blackcurrant notes developing as the fruit ripens. The ripe fruit will hang on the bush in good condition through late summer, but is very popular with birds. The somewhat unripe fruit can be used in cooking recipes as a gooseberry. Like blackcurrants the fruit freezes well, and like many other members of the genus<span> </span><i>Ribes</i><span> </span>it is rich in<span> </span>vitamin C.</p> <p>Commercial production of jostaberries is limited because they are not well suited to mechanical harvesting.<span> </span>Compared to most other fruits, harvesting jostaberries is relatively labor-intensive per kilogram. Although harder to pluck than blackcurrants, the plant is thornless.</p> <p>The plant itself grows to a maximum height of about 2 m, flowering in mid-spring, with fruit setting and ripening on a similar timetable to the blackcurrant. The plant displays<span> </span>hybrid vigor, growing and fruiting well and being resistant to a number of common diseases afflicting other<span> </span><i>Ribes</i>. In particular the plant is resistant to<span> </span>American gooseberry mildew,<span> </span>blackcurrant leaf spot,<span> </span>white pine blister rust, and<span> </span>big bud gall mite. Flowers are hermaphrodite and the plant is self-fertile following insect pollination.</p> </body> </html>
V 146 (5 S)
Jostaberry Seeds (Ribes × nidigrolaria)
Níspero - Loquat Seeds (Eriobotrya japonica)

Níspero - Loquat zaden...

Prijs € 4,50 SKU: V 127
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Níspero - Loquat zaden (Eriobotrya japonica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs voor een pakket van 5 zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p>De<span> </span><b>loquat</b><span> </span>(<i>Eriobotrya japonica</i>), Japanse (wol)mispel<span> </span>of neffel is een bekende<span> </span>vrucht<span> </span>uit de<span> </span>rozenfamilie. De plant staat in het<span> </span>Spaans<span> </span>bekend als<span> </span><i>nísperero del Japón</i><span> </span>en de vrucht als<span> </span><i>níspero japonés</i>. In Turkije worden ze “Yeni Dünya”, wat “Nieuwe Wereld” betekent, of Maltese pruimen genoemd. In Turkije worden deze vruchten gewoon als vers fruit gegeten, maar ook in een klein aantal kebabgerechten verwerkt. In Nederland zijn ze vaak alleen in Turkse groentewinkels verkrijgbaar. Het is een<span> </span>groenblijvende, 5-10 m hoge<span> </span>boom<span> </span>met een ronde kroon en een korte stam. Jonge takken zijn wollig behaard. De afwisselend geplaatste bladeren groeien vooral in de scheuttoppen dicht opeen. Ze zijn lancetvormig, toegespitst, aan de bovenkant glanzend donkergroen, aan de onderkant dof lichtgroen en tot 35 x 13 cm groot. Jonge bladeren zijn dicht en wollig behaard en oudere bladeren zijn open behaard en worden op den duur in de voorjaarsrui in aanzienlijke aantallen afgeworpen. De 1-2 cm brede, witte<span> </span>bloemen<span> </span>hebben vijf<span> </span>kroonbladeren<span> </span>en staan met dertig tot honderdvijftig stuks in roodbruin behaarde<span> </span>pluimen<span> </span>aan de scheuttoppen. Ze bloeien niet tegelijk en openen zich van de herfst tot in de winter en ruiken weldadig zoet.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Vrucht">Vrucht</span></h2> <p>De eivormige, oranje vrucht is 3-8 x 2-5 cm groot. Onder de oranje schil zit het zeer sappige, aromatische, zoetzure vruchtvlees, wat enigszins doet denken aan<span> </span>abrikoos. De vrucht bevat één tot tien (meestal twee tot vijf) tot 2 cm grote, ovale, afgeplatte, bruine<span> </span>zaden. De vruchten kunnen uit de hand gegeten worden of worden verwerkt tot fruitsalades,<span> </span>vruchtensappen,<span> </span>compote,<span> </span>consumptie-ijs<span> </span>en<span> </span>jam. Ook worden de vruchten onder andere in<span> </span>China<span> </span>en<span> </span>Taiwan<span> </span>ingeblikt. De vrucht wordt hier vanuit het zuiden van Europa en Noord-Afrika op de markt aangeboden, maar vaak onder de foutieve benaming<span> </span>mispel, wat de vrucht is van<span> </span><i>Mespilus germanica</i>, een verwante soort.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Met_de_hand_bestuiven">Met de hand bestuiven</span></h2> <p>De loquat kan ook in het Nederlandse en Belgische gematigd zeeklimaat overleven, maar geopende bloemen zijn gevoelig voor vorst. Op milde plaatsen kan men vruchten verkrijgen als men de bloemen herhaalde malen met een penseel over en weer bestuift. De vruchten zijn al in het voorjaar rijp. Het gewas laat zich uitstekend zaaien, want uit bijna elke pit ontspruit een plant, maar voor een rijke oogst en grote vruchten kan men beter een vegetatief vermeerderde fruitselectie aanplanten.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Herkomst_en_verspreiding">Herkomst en verspreiding</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Níspero - Loquat zaden (Eriobotrya japonica)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/50/Eriobotrya_japonica.jpg/260px-Eriobotrya_japonica.jpg" decoding="async" width="260" height="195" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/50/Eriobotrya_japonica.jpg/390px-Eriobotrya_japonica.jpg 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/50/Eriobotrya_japonica.jpg/520px-Eriobotrya_japonica.jpg 2x" data-file-width="2592" data-file-height="1944" title="Níspero - Loquat zaden (Eriobotrya japonica)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Loquat in de<span> </span>Botanische Tuin TU Delft</div> </div> </div> <p>De plant komt van nature voor in het zuidoosten van<span> </span>China<span> </span>en in<span> </span>Japan<span> </span>waar hij al meer dan 1000 jaar als fruitboom wordt gekweekt. Tegenwoordig wordt de loquat wereldwijd in mediterrane gebieden, de<span> </span>subtropen<span> </span>en<span> </span>tropisch<span> </span>gebergte gekweekt.</p> </body> </html>
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Níspero - Loquat Seeds (Eriobotrya japonica)
Irish Moss, Carrageen Moss Seeds (Chondrus Crispus)

Irish Moss, Carrageen Moss...

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: MHS 101 CC
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Irish Moss, Carrageen Moss Seeds (Chondrus Crispus)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f90707; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Chondrus crispus—commonly called Irish moss or carrageen moss (Irish carraigín, "little rock")—is a species of red algae which grows abundantly along the rocky parts of the Atlantic coast of Europe and North America. In its fresh condition this protist is soft and cartilaginous, varying in color from a greenish-yellow, through red, to a dark purple or purplish-brown. The principal constituent is a mucilaginous body, made of the polysaccharide carrageenan, which constitutes 55% of its weight. The organism also consists of nearly 10% protein and about 15% mineral matter, and is rich in iodine and sulfur. When softened in water it has a sea-like odour and because of the abundant cell wall polysaccharides it will form a jelly when boiled, containing from 20 to 100 times its weight of water.</span></p> <p><span>Chondrus crispus is a relatively small sea alga, reaching up to a little over than 20 cm in length. It grows from a discoid holdfast and branches four or five times in a dichotomous, fan-like manner. The morphology is highly variable, especially the broadness of the thalli. The branches are 2–15 mm broad, firm in texture and the color ranges from light to dark green, dark red, purple, brown, yellowish, and white. The gametophytes (see below) often show a blue iridescence at the tip of the fronds[1] and fertile sporophytes show a spotty pattern. Mastocarpus stellatus (Stackhouse) Guiry is a similar species which can be readily distinguished by its strongly channelled and often somewhat twisted thallus. The cystocarpic plants of Mastocarpus show reproductive papillae quite distinctively different from Chondrus.[2] When washed and sun-dried for preservation, it has a yellowish, translucent, horn-like aspect and consistency.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Distribution</span></strong></p> <p><span>Chondrus crispus is common all around the shores of Ireland and can also be found along the coast of Europe including Iceland, the Faroe Islands [3] western Baltic Sea to southern Spain.[2] It is found on the Atlantic coasts of Canada[2][4] and recorded from California in the United States to Japan.[2] However, any distribution outside the Northern Atlantic needs to be verified. There are also other species of the same genus in the Pacific Ocean, for example, C. ocellatus Holmes, C. nipponicus Yendo, C. yendoi Yamada et Mikami, C. pinnulatus (Harvey) Okamura and C. armatus (Harvey) Yamada et Mikami.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Ecology</span></strong></p> <p><span>Chondrus crispus is found growing on rock from the middle intertidal zone into the subtidal zone,</span></p> <p><span> all the way to the ocean floor. So it is very hard for sunlight to reach it.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>Chondrus crispus is an industrial source of carrageenan, which is commonly used as a thickener and stabilizer[7] in milk products such as ice cream[8] and processed foods, including lunch meat. In Europe, it is indicated as E407 or E407b. It may also be used as a thickener in calico-printing and for fining beer or wine. Irish moss is frequently used with Mastocarpus stellatus (Gigartina mamillosa), Chondracanthus acicularis (G. acicularis) and other seaweeds, which are all commonly found growing together. Carragheen and agar-agar are also used in Asia for gelatin-like desserts, such as almond jelly. Presently, the major source of carrageenan is tropical seaweeds of the genera Kappaphycus and Eucheuma.</span></p> <p><span>In Ireland and parts of Scotland (where it is also known as (An) Cairgean in Scottish Gaelic), it is boiled in milk and strained, before sugar and other flavourings such as vanilla, cinnamon, brandy or whiskey are added.[10] The end-product is a kind of jelly similar to pannacotta, tapioca, or blancmange.[11] Similarly, in Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago Gracilaria spp is boiled with cinnamon and milk to make a thick drink called Irish Moss that is believed to be an aphrodisiac.[12] In Venezuela it has been used for generations as a home remedy for sore throat and chest congestion, boiled in milk and served with honey before bed.</span></p> <p><span>Irish moss is commonly used as a clarifying agent or finings in the process of brewing (beer), particularly in homebrewing. A small amount is added to the kettle or "copper" where it is boiled with the wort, attracting proteins and other solids, which are then removed from the mixture after cooling along with the copper finings.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Life history</span></strong></p> <p><span>Chondrus crispus undergoes an alternation of generation life cycle common in many species of algae (see figure below). There are two distinct stages: the sexual haploid gametophyte stage and the asexual diploid sporophyte stage. In addition, there is a third stage- the carposporophyte, which is formed on the female gametophyte after fertilization. The male and female gametophytes produce gametes which fuse to form a diploid carposporophyte, which forms carpospores, which develops into the sporophyte. The sporophyte then undergoes meiosis to produce haploid tetraspores (which can be male or female) that develop into gametophytes. The three stages (male, female and sporophyte) are difficult to distinguish when they are not fertile; however, the gametophytes often show a blue iridescence.</span></p> </body> </html>
MHS 101 CC
Irish Moss, Carrageen Moss Seeds (Chondrus Crispus)