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Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature

Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds -...

Ár 3,00 € SKU: V 22 M
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/indian-dwarf-papaya-seeds-paw-paw-miniature.html" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Tropical Dwarf Papaya is fast-growing papaya it only reaches 170 cm to 200 cm but bears fruits as large as 1 kg in 6-8 months from seed.</strong></a></p> <p>Papaya (Carica papaya L.) - Deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency, it is no wonder the papaya was reputably called the "fruit of the angels" by Christopher Columbus. Once considered quite exotic, they can now be found in markets throughout the year. Although there is a slight seasonal peak in early summer and fall, papaya trees produce fruit year-round.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are fruits that remind us of the tropics, the regions of the world in which they are grown. Once considered an exotic fruit, papayas' rise in popularity has made them much more available. Papaya fruits are good sources of Vitamin A, B, and C.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are spherical or pear-shaped fruits that can be as long as 20 inches. The ones commonly found in the market usually average about 7 inches and weigh about one pound. Their flesh is a rich orange color with either yellow or pink hues.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papaya has a wonderfully soft, butter-like consistency and a deliciously sweet, musky taste. Inside the inner cavity of the fruit are black, round seeds encased in a gelatinous-like substance. Papaya's seeds are edible, although their peppery flavor is somewhat bitter.&nbsp;</p> <p>The fruit, as well as the other parts of the papaya tree, contain papain, an enzyme that helps digest proteins. This enzyme is especially concentrated in the fruit when it is unripe. Papain is extracted to make digestive enzyme dietary supplements and is also used as an ingredient in some chewing gums.&nbsp;</p> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/indian-dwarf-papaya-seeds-paw-paw-miniature.html" target="_blank" title="How To Grow Papaya From Seed" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>How To Grow Papaya From Seed</strong></a></h2> <p>Select a sunny and sheltered place in your garden. That's right, in your garden. Don't start them in pots!</p> <p>Papayas don't transplant well. Anything that disturbs the roots of papayas really sets them back. They just hate it. The most foolproof way to grow papayas is to simply plant them where they are to live.</p> <p>Papaya trees are very, very hungry. That means they need very good soil, rich in organic matter and nutrients.</p> <p>If you don't have fabulous soil, make some. Dig a hole half a meter across and fill it with a mix of good compost and soil. Actually, make at least two or three such planting beds in different locations.</p> <p>Now sprinkle on some of your seeds. A couple of dozen per bed is a good amount. Cover the seeds lightly with more compost, and then mulch the patch well. The seeds usually take about a couple of weeks to germinate and may take longer.</p> <p>Soon you will notice that your seedlings are very different in size and vigor. That's why we planted so many. Start culling the weaker ones. Pull them out while still small, or cut bigger ones down to the ground. Only keep the very best.</p> <p>At this stage, you should keep about half a dozen plants. Papaya plants can be male, female, or bisexual, and you want to make sure that you have some females or bisexual plants amongst your seedlings. The male papayas don't bear fruit.</p> <p>Papayas start flowering when they are about one meter tall. The male's flower first. Male flowers have long, thin stalks with several small blooms. Female flowers are usually single blooms, bigger, and very close to the trunk.&nbsp;</p> <p>Cull most of the male plants. You only need one male for every ten to fifteen female plants to ensure good pollination.</p> <p>And that's it. You should end up with one very strong and healthy female plant per bed. (And a male plant somewhere...) If the weather is warm enough, and if you are growing your papayas in full sun and in good soil, then you could be picking the first ripe fruit within 10 months.</p> <h3>How much water?</h3> <p>Papayas have large soft leaves. They evaporate a lot of water in warm weather, so they need a lot of water. But unfortunately, papayas are very susceptible to root rot, especially in cool weather. Overwatering is the most common reason for problems when growing papayas.</p> <p>It depends on the temperature and on the overall health and vigor of the plant. A healthier plant will cope better, but in general, you should be careful not to overwater during periods of cool weather.</p> <h3>Growing Papaya In Cooler Climates</h3> <p>If you get at least long hot summers you could grow papaya just as an ornamental plant. In this case, you would start them in a pot indoors to gain extra time. Plant them out against a sun-facing wall and enjoy the tropical look. However, you won't be able to keep your papaya alive long enough to get fruit.</p> <p>The only other option is growing papaya in a huge pot, and to keep the pot in a heated greenhouse in winter. You may also grow papaya as an annual decorative plant.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 22 M
Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature
Bársony Babmag (Mucuna...

Bársony Babmag (Mucuna...

Ár 2,85 € SKU: P 88 MP
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Bársony Babmag (Mucuna pruriens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>5 magos csomag ára.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Kínálatunkban fehér és fekete magú Mucuna pruriens van. Válasszon a szín opció alatt, a mag színe.</strong></p> <p>A Mucuna pruriens egy trópusi hüvelyes, amely Afrikában és trópusi Ázsiában őshonos, és nagyrészt naturalizált és termesztett. Az angol elnevezések közé tartozik a majom tamarind, a bársony bab, a bengáli bársony bab, a floridai bársony bab, a mauritiusi bársony bab, a Jokohama bársony bab, a cowage, a cowitch, a Lacuna bab és a lyoni bab. A növény ismert a rendkívüli viszketésről, amelyet a fiatal lombokkal és a maghüvelyekkel érintkezve okoz. Mezőgazdasági és kertészeti értéke van, és a gyógynövényekben használják.</p> <p>A növény egy éves mászócserje, hosszú szőlővel, amely meghaladja a 15 métert. Amikor a növény fiatal, szinte teljesen pelyhes haj borítja, idősebb korában azonban szinte teljesen szőrtelen. A levelek hármas csúcsúak, tojásdadok, fordítottan tojásdadok, rombusz alakúak vagy széles ovális alakúak. A levelek oldala gyakran erősen barázdált, a hegyek hegyesek. A fiatal M. pruriens növényekben a levelek mindkét oldalán szőrszálak vannak. A röpcédulák szárai két-három milliméter hosszúak (kb. Egy hüvelyk tizede). További szomszédos levelek vannak és körülbelül 5 milliméter hosszúak.</p> <p>használat</p> <p>A viszketõ bab takarmánynövényként elterjedt a trópusokon. Ebből a célból az egész növényt silózzák, szárítják szénaként vagy a magokat tömény takarmányként. A viszketõ babos szilázs 11–23% nyersfehérjét és 35–40% nyersrostot, a szárított bab 20–35% nyersfehérjét és kevesebb mint 5% nyersrostot tartalmaz. Gyógynövényként is használják. A magokat Parkinson-kóros betegeknél használják L-Dopa tartalmuk miatt.</p> <p>A magokat iparilag is feldolgozzák erre a célra.</p> <p>A pörkölt viszkető bab a kávé élelmiszer-helyettesítőjeként szolgálhat. Friss hajtásokat vagy babot főzve is fogyaszthatunk. Ehhez a növényrészeknek legalább 30 percig forrniuk kell, és előzőleg 48 órán át vízben kell áztatniuk, különben mérgezőek az emberre. Feldolgozatlan bab a nem kérődző állatokra is mérgező. A vad formákban (a M. p. Var. Utilis kivételével minden fajta) a növényi szőrök mukunint tartalmaznak, amely irritálja a bőrt és nagyon kellemetlen viszketést okoz. Emiatt többek között kereskedelmi viszketési porokhoz is használják őket.</p> <p>Állítólag az ájurvédikus gyógyszereknek afrodiziákum hatása van. Azt mondják, hogy hallucinogén hatása is van, ezért a növény egyes részeit időnként hozzáadják Ayahuascához - DMT-t és monoamin-oxidáz-gátlót tartalmazó mámorító italhoz.</p> <p>Egy tanulmány 60 meddő férfit vizsgált meg, akik pszichés stressztől szenvedtek. A vizsgálat során vették a viszketõ babot, a Mucuna pruriens-t, és érezhetõen alacsonyabb stressz-érzéssel és több spermiummal rendelkeztek, mint korábban. A lenyelés stimulálta az antioxidáns védekező rendszert és javította a stresszkezelést.</p> <p></p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 178 B (5 S)
Bársony Babmag (Mucuna pruriens)
Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Ár 1,70 € SKU: MHS 150
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Kupusinski jabučar is old Serbian variety, and one of the favorite old varieties The fruit bulb is apple-shaped (hence the name Kupusinski jabučar), with a solid, well-closed neck. Sheath leaves are dark yellow in color. This variety can be stored for a long time, without to lose taste.</p> <p>"Kupusinski jabučar" translated to English "Apple Onion aus Kupusina" (Kupusina is Village in Serbia).</p> <p>The medium-hot variety is grown successfully from seeds. The average mass of the fruit bulb is 80-120 g. </p> <p>The dry matter content is 12-14%. It yields about 300 mc/ha.</p> <p> <script type="text/javascript"></script> </p>
MHS 150 (100 S)
Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Variety from America

Sugar beet seeds Authority...

Sugar beet seeds Authority...

Ár 1,75 € SKU: P 8
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Sugar beet seeds Authority - Heirloom</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Sugar beet - a cold-resistant, light-loving culture, medium-demanding to the fertility of the soil. Sugar beet gives high stable yields, easy to transport. Sugar beet loves heat, light, and moisture.</p> <p>The amount of sugar in the fruit depends on the number of sunny days in August — October. Sugar beet is used not only for making sugar but also for feeding animals.</p> <p>The optimum temperature for seed germination is 10–12 ° C, growth, and development is 20–22 ° C. Shoots are sensitive to frost.</p> <p>Name: Sugar beet Authority<br />Harvest: 75-100 days<br />Root weight: 500-850 g<br />The sugar content: 18-21%<br />Sowing depth: 2-3 cm.</p> <p>tion temperature: 10-15 ° C.</p>
P 8 (20 S)
Sugar beet seeds Authority - Heirloom
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1

Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria...

Ár 1,95 € SKU: MHS 81
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 100 (0,046 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Stellaria media, chickweed, is a cool-season annual plant native to Europe, but naturalized in many parts of North America. It is used as a cooling herbal remedy, and grown as a vegetable crop and ground cover for both human consumption and poultry. It is sometimes called common chickweed to distinguish it from other plants called chickweed. Other common names include chickenwort, craches, maruns, winterweed. The plant germinates in autumn or late winter, then forms large mats of foliage. Flowers are small and white, followed quickly by the seed pods. This plant flowers and sets seed at the same time.</p> <p>Stellaria media is widespread in North America, Europe and Asia. There are several closely related plants referred to as chickweed, but which lack the culinary properties of plants in the genus Stellaria. Plants in the genus Cerastium are very similar in appearance to Stellaria and are in the same family (Carophyllaceae). Stellaria media can be easily distinguished from all other members of this family by examining the stems. Stellaria has fine hairs on only one side of the stem in a single band and on the sepals.[1] Other members of the family Carophyllaceae which resemble Stellaria have hairs uniformly covering the entire stem. It usually has 3 stamens[1] other references indicate 5 stamens[2] and 3 - 8 in other references.</p> <p>The larvae of the European moth yellow shell (Camptogramma bilineata), of North American moths pale-banded dart (Agnorisma badinodis) or dusky cutworm (Agrotis venerabilis) or North American butterfly dainty sulphur (Nathalis iole) all feed on chickweed.</p> <p>In both Europe and North America this plant is common in gardens,[4] fields, and disturbed grounds. Control is difficult due to the heavy seed sets. Common Chickweed is very competitive with small grains, and can produce up to 80% yield losses among barley.</p> <h2><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></h2> <h2><strong>As food</strong></h2> <p>Stellaria media is edible and nutritious, and is used as a leaf vegetable, often raw in salads. It is one of the ingredients of the symbolic dish consumed in the Japanese spring-time festival, Nanakusa-no-sekku.</p> <h3><strong>Toxicity</strong></h3> <p>S. media contains plant chemicals known as saponins, which can be toxic when consumed in large quantities. Chickweed has been known to cause saponin poisoning in cattle. However, as the animal must consume several kilos of chickweed in order to reach a toxic level, such deaths are rare.</p> <p><strong>In folk medicine</strong></p> <p>The plant has medicinal purposes and is used in folk medicine. It has been used as a remedy to treat itchy skin conditions and pulmonary diseases.[7] 17th century herbalist John Gerard recommended it as a remedy for mange. Modern herbalists prescribe it for iron-deficiency anemia (for its high iron content), as well as for skin diseases, bronchitis, rheumatic pains, arthritis and period pain.[8] Not all of these uses are supported by scientific evidence.</p>
MHS 81 (0,046 g)
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1

Superstar Melon Seeds

Superstar Melon Seeds

Ár 2,15 € SKU: V 246
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Superstar Melon Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for a Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>It is designed for early production and the main part of the season. The average fruit weight is 1.5-3kg. The fruits are very tasty and hard, suitable for long distance transportation.</p>
V 246 (10 S)
Superstar Melon Seeds
Russet Buffaloberry Seeds (Shepherdia canadensis)

Russet Buffaloberry Seeds...

Ár 1,95 € SKU: V 64
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Russet Buffaloberry Seeds (Shepherdia canadensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Hardy, Adaptable, Easy to Grow, Fast Growth, Edible Fruits, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Cold, Heat, Drought, Salt and Wind Tolerant, Nitrogen Fixing.</div> <div> Shepherdia canadensis, also known as Russet Buffaloberry, Soopolallie, Soapberry, or Foamberry, is one of a small number of shrubs of the genus Shepherdia bearing edible red berries. The berries have an extremely bitter taste. The plant is a deciduous shrub found in open forests and thickets all over North America. Its northern limit is around the Arctic Circle. The shrub reaches a height of 3 to 13 feet. Fruits are extensively collected by some Canadian First Nations peoples such as Nlaka'pamux (Thompson), St̓átimc and Secwepemc (Shuswap) in the province of British Columbia. The bitter berries are not eaten directly but rather processed as sxusem ("sxushem") or "Indian ice-cream". Branches bearing fruit are hit with a stick and only the very ripe fruits that fall off are collected. A clean mat or tarpaulin is placed below the bush for collection. The berries are later placed into a great bowl that is absolutely free of oil or fat and are mixed with some sweet fruit such as raspberries. The mixture of berries is crushed and vigorously beaten in the manner of whipping cream in order to raise the typical foam of the sxusem confection. Sxusem has an agreeable blend of sweet and somewhat bitter tastes, possibly comparable to that encountered in sweetened coffee. The substance is believed by the First Nations peoples who prepare it to have many healthful properties, but the saponin chemicals making up the foam may also cause gastrointestinal irritation if consumed greatly. Native theme restaurants in British Columbia have occasionally had sxusem on the menu in recent years.</div> <div>Leaf: Alternate, simple, elliptical to ovate, entire margins, 1 to 2 inches long, somewhat thickened dark green above with numerous silvery white scales, silvery white below with red-brown scales. </div> <div>Flower: Dioecious; male and female flowers both light yellow-green, small (1/6 inch) and inconspicuous, appearing in early spring. </div> <div>Fruit: A bright red drupe-like achene, 1/3 inch long and somewhat elongated, generally with a few silvery scales, ripen in mid to late summer and often occur in great abundance. </div> <div>Twig: Slender, light brown and covered in numerous reddish brown, scruffy scales; buds stalked with valvate scales, flower buds more round. </div> <div>Bark: Shiny reddish gray with numerous lenticels that develop into larger cracks and splits. </div> <div>Form: A small shrub reaching up to 6 feet in height (occasionally much larger) with a dense rounded crown.</div> <div>Other Names: Russet Buffaloberry, Russet Buffalo berry, Hippophae canadensis, Rabbitberry, Foamberry Soapberry, Soopalollie, Canadian Buffaloberry</div> <div>Zone: 2 to 6</div> <div>Growth Rate: Fast</div> <div>Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub</div> <div>Family: Elaeagnaceae</div> <div>Height: 6 to 8 feet</div> <div>Spread: 6 to 8 feet</div> <div>Shape: Upright, rounded</div> <div>Bloom Time: April-May</div> <div>Bloom Color: Yellow</div> <div>Flower/Fruit: Small, inconspicuous, yellow flowers are followed by yellowish-red, oval-shaped fruits.</div> <div>Sun: Sun-Part Shade</div> <div>Drought Tolerance: High</div> <div>Water: Medium</div> <div>Maintenance: Medium</div> <div>Site Requirements/ Soil Tolerances: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerates wide range of soils. Very hardy and adaptable. Give it plenty of room to spread.</div> <div>Culture: Can be pruned to a small tree. Remove root suckers and runners to control any unwanted spread of the plant. To keep it at a low height, cut it back to knee high every 5 to 10 years. If it gets too leggy, it can be cut back to the ground and it will come back bushier and with more berries the next year.</div> <div>Uses: Wildlife shelter, screens, windbreaks. Naturalize in open woodland areas where it can be allowed to spread. Erosion control on slopes. Native plant gardens. Informal hedge. Good for dry, salty, high-pH soils, such as along highways.</div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Pour Hot water over seed. Soak in water for 24 hours</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 64 (5 S)
Russet Buffaloberry Seeds (Shepherdia canadensis)
Sprinter uborka mag

Sprinter uborka mag

Ár 1,65 € SKU: PK 22
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sprinter uborka mag</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>A 30 - 40 (1 g) magot tartalmazó csomag ára.</strong></span></h2> A Sprinter uborka kiváló szerbiai uborkafajta salátákhoz. A növény erős, jól elágazó, hosszú hajtásokkal és sötétzöld levelekkel.<br />A gyümölcs egységes sötétzöld színű, hengeres alakú, a gyümölcs átlagos hossza 18-25 cm. A Sprinter uborka közepesen korai fajta, az első gyümölcsök a csírázás után 58-60 nappal érkeznek betakarításra.<br /><br />Rezisztencia: a Phytophthora infestans és a lisztharmat magasabb szintű toleranciája jellemzi <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PK 22 (1g)
Sprinter uborka mag
Vöröshagyma mag Ptujski Luk

Vöröshagyma mag Ptujski Luk

Ár 2,05 € SKU: VE 20 PL
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Vöröshagyma mag Ptujski Luk</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>50 mag csomagolás ára.</strong></span></h2> <strong>A HAGYMA KIRÁLYA és egy európai különlegesség!</strong><br />A Ptujski hagymát ugyanúgy kézzel termesztik, szedik és koszorúkba fonják, mint az elmúlt 200 évben. Íze, szúróssága és minősége az egyik legjobb hagymafajta. Az alkalmazott hagyományos termesztési módszerek és eredete a Ptujski hagyma védett földrajzi jelzéssel gazdagodott, és helyet kapott nemcsak a védett szlovén mezőgazdasági termékek, hanem az európai specialitások listáján is.<br /><br /><strong>Íz, eredet, hagyomány</strong><br />A kavicsos talaj és az éghajlat a nap és az eső tökéletes kombinációjával különleges csípősséget kölcsönöz ennek a hagymafajtának. A Ptujski lük tökéletes főzéshez és gyorsan szétesik. Ez is jól tárolható - általában sötét és hűvös helyen tavaszig.<br /><br /> <h3><strong>Hogyan ismeri fel a Ptujski hagymát?</strong></h3> Lapos, szív alakú<br />Pikkelyleveleinek vörösesbarna vagy élénkpiros színe<br />Fehér húsa, lila-vöröses árnyalattal és kifejezett lila éllel<br />Közepesen csípős íze<br />Erős „hagymás” illata
VE 20 PL (50 S)
Vöröshagyma mag Ptujski Luk

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Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds

Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds

Ár 2,65 € SKU: VE 222
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>It is a gigantic Japanese cabbage, which grows to an enormous size. Interestingly, he does not need any more time than ordinary cabbage to reach that size.</span></p> <p><span>Surely there will be vegetables in your garden that will attract passersby views.</span></p>
VE 222 (20 S)
Japanese Giant Cabbage Seeds

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Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds...

Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds...

Ár 1,65 € SKU: MHS 38
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Thai Holy Basil Seeds (Ocimum tenuiflorum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 0,036g (100), 1g (2800) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This kind of Basil has a spicy, peppery, clove-like taste, may be the basil Thai people love most and is at least used in all street kitchens and restaurants in the country.</p> <p>Ocimum tenuiflorum, also known as Ocimum sanctum, holy basil, or tulasi or tulsi (also sometimes spelled thulasi), is an aromatic plant in the family Lamiaceae which is native to the Indian subcontinent and widespread as a cultivated plant throughout the Southeast Asian tropics.[2][3] It is an erect, many-branched subshrub, 30–60 cm (12–24 in) tall with hairy stems and simple phyllotaxic green or purple leaves that are strongly scented.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Leaves have petioles and are ovate, up to 5 cm (2.0 in) long, usually slightly toothed. The flowers are purplish in elongate racemes in close whorls.[3] The two main morphotypes cultivated in India and Nepal are green-leaved (Sri or Lakshmi tulasi) and purple-leaved (Krishna tulasi).[4]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tulasi is cultivated for religious and medicinal purposes, and for its essential oil. It is widely known across the Indian subcontinent as a medicinal plant and a herbal tea, commonly used in Ayurveda, and has an important role within the Vaishnava tradition of Hinduism, in which devotees perform worship involving holy basil plants or leaves. This plant is revered as an elixir of life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The variety of Ocimum tenuiflorum used in Thai cuisine is referred to as Thai holy basil (Thai: กะเพรา kaphrao);[2] it is not to be confused with Thai basil, which is a variety of Ocimum basilicum.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Genetics</strong></p> <p>DNA barcodes of various biogeographical isolates of Tulsi from the Indian subcontinent are now available. In a large-scale phylogeographical study of this species conducted using chloroplast genome sequences, a group of researchers from Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, have found that this plant originates from North Central India.[5][6] The discovery might suggest the evolution of Tulsi is related with the cultural migratory patterns in the Indian subcontinent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p><strong>In Hinduism</strong></p> <p>Tulsi leaves are an essential part in the worship of Vishnu and his avatars, including Krishna and Ram, and other male Vaishnava deities such as Hanuman, Balarama, Garuda and many others. Tulsi is a sacred plant for Hindus and is worshipped as the avatar of Lakshmi.[7] It is believed that water mixed with the petals given to the dying raises their departing souls to heaven.[8] Tulsi, which is Sanskrit for "the incomparable one", is most often regarded as a consort of Krishna in the form of Lakshmi.[9][10] According to the Brahma Vaivarta Purana, tulsi is an expression of Sita.[11][full citation needed] There are two types of tulsi worshipped in Hinduism: "Rama tulsi" has light green leaves and is larger in size; "Shyama tulsi" has dark green leaves and is important for the worship of Hanuman.[12] Many Hindus have tulasi plants growing in front of or near their home, often in special pots. Traditionally, tulsi is planted in the centre of the central courtyard of Hindu houses. It is also frequently grown next to Hanuman temples, especially in Varanasi.[13][full citation needed]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>According to Vaishnavas, it is believed in Puranas that during Samudra Manthana, when the gods win the ocean-churning against the asuras, Dhanvantari comes up from the ocean with Amrit in hand for the gods. Dhanvantari, the divine healer, sheds happy tears, and when the first drop falls in the Amrit, it forms tulasi. In the ceremony of Tulsi Vivaha, tulsi is ceremonially married to Krishna annually on the eleventh day of the waxing moon or twelfth of the month of Kartik in the lunar calendar. This day also marks the end of the four-month Chaturmas, which is considered inauspicious for weddings and other rituals, so the day inaugurates the annual marriage season in India. The ritual lighting of lamps each evening during Kartik includes the worship of the tulsi plant, which is held to be auspicious for the home. Vaishnavas especially follow the daily worship of tulsi during Kartik.[14] In another legend, Tulsi was a pious woman who sought a boon to marry Vishnu. Lakshmi, Vishnu's consort, cursed her to become a plant in earth. However, Vishnu appeased her by giving her a boon that she would grace him when he appears in the form of Shaligrama in temples.[15]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Vaishnavas traditionally use Hindu prayer beads made from tulsi stems or roots, which are an important symbol of initiation. Tulsi rosaries are considered to be auspicious for the wearer, and believed to put them under the protection of Hanuman. They have such a strong association with Vaishnavas, that followers of Hanuman are known as "those who bear the tulsi round the neck".</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Ayurveda</strong></p> <p>Tulasi (Sanskrit:-Surasa) has been used for thousands of years in Ayurveda for its diverse healing properties. It is mentioned in the Charaka Samhita,[16] an ancient Ayurvedic text. Tulsi is considered to be an adaptogen,[17] balancing different processes in the body, and helpful for adapting to stress.[18] Marked by its strong aroma and astringent taste, it is regarded in Ayurveda as a kind of "elixir of life" and believed to promote longevity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tulasi extracts are used in ayurvedic remedies for a variety of ailments. Traditionally, tulasi is taken in many forms: as herbal tea, dried powder, fresh leaf or mixed with ghee. Essential oil extracted from Karpoora tulasi is mostly used for medicinal purposes and in herbal cosmetics.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Thai cuisine</strong></p> <p>The leaves of holy basil, known as kaphrao in the Thai language (Thai: กะเพรา), are commonly used in Thai cuisine. Kaphrao should not be confused with horapha (Thai: โหระพา), which is normally known as Thai basil, or with Thai lemon basil (maenglak; Thai: แมงลัก).</p> <p>The best-known dish made with this herb is phat kaphrao (Thai: ผัดกะเพรา) — a stir-fry of Thai holy basil with meats, seafood or, as in khao phat kraphao, with rice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Insect repellent</strong></p> <p>For centuries, the dried leaves have been mixed with stored grains to repel insects.[24] In Sri Lanka this plant is used as a mosquito repellent. Sinhala: Maduruthalaa</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Pharmacological study</strong></p> <p>Some of the main chemical constituents of tulsi are: oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, rosmarinic acid, eugenol, carvacrol, linalool, β-caryophyllene (about 8%), β-elemene (c.11.0%), and germacrene D (about 2%).</p> <p>Isolated O. sanctum extracts have some antibacterial activity against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Genome sequence</strong></p> <p>The genome of Tulsi plant has been sequenced and the draft genome has been published independently by research teams from CSIR-Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants at Lucknow and National Centre for Biological Sciences at Bengaluru. The genome size was estimated to be 612 mega bases and results from the sequencing project show that certain metabolite-biosynthesis genes such as genes for biosynthesis of Anthocyanin in Krishna Tulsi variety, Ursolic acid and Eugenol in Rama Tulsi variety were expressed in large quantities. These metabolites were shown to have anti-cancerous properties as well. It was further commented that these metabolites could be utilized as anti-cancerous drugs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 38 (100 S)
Tulsi, Holy Basil Seeds (Ocimum tenuiflorum)
Roselle Seeds - Edible and tasty

Roselle Seeds - Edible and...

Ár 1,75 € SKU: MHS 19
,
5/ 5
<div> <h2><strong>Roselle Seeds - edible and tasty (Hibiscus sabdariffa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a species of Hibiscus native to the Old World tropics, used for the production of bast fibre and as an infusion. It is an annual or perennial herb or woody-based subshrub, growing to 2–2.5 m (7–8 ft) tall. The leaves are deeply three- to five-lobed, 8–15 cm (3–6 in) long, arranged alternately on the stems.</p> </div> <p>The flowers are 8–10 cm (3–4 in) in diameter, white to pale yellow with a dark red spot at the base of each petal, and have a stout fleshy calyx at the base, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) wide, enlarging to 3–3.5 cm (1.2–1.4 in), fleshy and bright red as the fruit matures. It takes about six months to mature.</p> <p><span><strong>Names</strong></span></p> <p><span>The roselle is known as the rosella or rosella fruit in Australia. It is also known as 'Belchanda' among Nepalese, Tengamora among Assamese and "mwitha" among Bodo tribals in Assam, চুকর Chukor in Bengali, Gongura in Telugu, Pundi in Kannada, Ambadi in Marathi, LalChatni or Kutrum in Mithila] Mathipuli in Kerala, chin baung in Burma, กระเจี๊ยบแดง KraJiabDaeng in Thailand, ສົ້ມ ພໍດີ som phor dee in Lao PDR, bissap in Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and Niger, the Congo and France, dah or dah bleni in other parts of Mali, wonjo in the Gambia, zobo in western Nigeria (the Yorubas in Nigeria call the white variety Isapa (pronounced Ishapa)), Zoborodo in Northern Nigeria, Chaye-Torosh in Iran, karkade (كركديه; Arabic pronunciation: [ˈkarkade])[dubious – discuss] in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Sudan, omutete in Namibia, sorrel in the Caribbean and in Latin America, Flor de Jamaica in Mexico, Saril in Panama, grosella in Paraguay and vinagreira, caruru-azedo or quiabo-roxo in Brazil. Rosela in Indonesia, asam belanda[1] in Malaysia. In Chinese it is 洛神花 (Luo Shen Hua) . In Zambia the plant is called lumanda in ciBemba, katolo in kiKaonde, or wusi in chiLunda.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plant is considered to have antihypertensive properties. In some places, the plant is primarily cultivated for the production of bast fibre from the stem of the plant. The fibre may be used as a substitute for jute in making burlap.[2] Hibiscus, specifically Roselle, has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, mild laxative, and treatment for cardiac and nerve diseases and cancer.[3]</span></p> <p><span>The red calyces of the plant are increasingly exported to America and Europe, where they are used as food colourings. Germany is the main importer. It can also be found in markets (as flowers or syrup) in some places such as France, where there are Senegalese immigrant communities. The green leaves are used like a spicy version of spinach. They give flavour to the Senegalese fish and rice dish thiéboudieune. Proper records are not kept, but the Senegalese government estimates national production and consumption at 700 t (770 short tons) per year. Also in Burma their green leaves are the main ingredient in making chin baung kyaw curry.</span></p> <p><span>In East Africa, the calyx infusion, called "Sudan tea", is taken to relieve coughs. Roselle juice, with salt, pepper, asafoetida and molasses, is taken as a remedy for biliousness.</span></p> <p><span>The heated leaves are applied to cracks in the feet and on boils and ulcers to speed maturation. A lotion made from leaves is used on sores and wounds. The seeds are said to be diuretic and tonic in action and the brownish-yellow seed oil is claimed to heal sores on camels. In India, a decoction of the seeds is given to relieve dysuria, strangury and mild cases of dyspepsia. Brazilians attribute stomachic, emollient and resolutive properties to the bitter roots.[4]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Leafy vegetable/Greens</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Andhra cuisine, Hibiscus cannabinus, called Gongura, is extensively used. The leaves are steamed along with lentils and cooked with Dal. The other unique dish prepared is gongura pachadi, it is prepared by mixing fried leaves with spices and made into a Gongura Pacchadi, the most famous dish of Andhra cuisine and is often described as king of all foods of Andhra ethnics(andhrulu)</span></p> <p><span>In Burmese cuisine, called chin baung ywet (lit. sour leaf), the roselle is widely used and considered an affordable vegetable for the population. It is perhaps the most widely eaten and popular vegetable in Burma.[5] The leaves are fried with garlic, dried or fresh prawns and green chili or cooked with fish. A light soup made from roselle leaves and dried prawn stock is also a popular dish.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Beverage</strong></span></p> <p><span>Cuisine: Among the Bodo tribals of Bodoland, Assam (India) the leaves of both hibiscus sabdariffa and hibiscus cannabinus are cooked along with chicken, fish or pork, one of their traditional cuisines</span></p> <p><span>In the Caribbean sorrel drink is made from sepals of the roselle. In Malaysia, roselle calyces are harvested fresh to produce pro-health drink due to high contents of vitamin C and anthocyanins. In Mexico, 'agua de Flor de Jamaica' (water flavored with roselle) frequently called "agua de Jamaica" is most often homemade. Also, since many untrained consumers mistake the calyces of the plant to be dried flowers, it is widely, but erroneously, believed that the drink is made from the flowers of the non-existent "Jamaica plant". It is prepared by boiling dried sepals and calyces of the Sorrel/Flower of Jamaica plant in water for 8 to 10 minutes (or until the water turns red), then adding sugar. It is often served chilled. This is also done in Saint Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago where it is called 'sorrel'. The drink is one of several inexpensive beverages (aguas frescas) commonly consumed in Mexico and Central America, and they are typically made from fresh fruits, juices or extracts. A similar thing is done in Jamaica but additional flavor is added by brewing the tea with ginger and adding rum. It is a popular drink of the country at Christmas time. It is also very popular in Trinidad &amp; Tobago but cinnamon, cloves and bay leaves are preferred to ginger. In Mali, Senegal, The Gambia, Burkina Faso and Benin calyces are used to prepare cold, sweet drinks popular in social events, often mixed with mint leaves, dissolved menthol candy, and/or various fruit flavors. The Middle Eastern and Sudanese drink "Karkade"(كركديه) is a cold drink made by soaking the dried Karkade flowers in cold water over night in a refrigerator with sugar and some lemon or lime juice added.It is then consumed with or without ice cubes after the flowers have been strained.In Lebanon, sometimes toasted pine nuts are tossed into the drink.</span></p> <p><span>With the advent in the U.S. of interest in south-of-the-border cuisine, the calyces are sold in bags usually labeled "Flor de Jamaica" and have long been available in health food stores in the U.S. for making a tea that is high in vitamin C. This drink is particularly good for people who have a tendency, temporary or otherwise, toward water retention: it is a mild diuretic.</span></p> <p><span>In addition to being a popular homemade drink, Jarritos, a popular brand of Mexican soft drinks, makes a Flor de Jamaica flavored carbonated beverage. Imported Jarritos can be readily found in the U.S.</span></p> <p><span>In the UK the dried calyces and ready-made sorrel syrup are widely and cheaply available in Caribbean and Asian grocers. The fresh calyces are imported mainly during December and January in order to make Christmas and New Year infusions, which are often made into cocktails with additional rum. They are very perishable, rapidly developing fungal rot, and need to be used soon after purchase – unlike the dried product, which has a long shelf-life.</span></p> <p><span>In Africa, especially the Sahel, roselle is commonly used to make a sugary herbal tea that is commonly sold on the street. The dried flowers can be found in every market. Roselle tea is also quite common in Italy where it spread during the first decades of the 20th century as a typical product of the Italian colonies. The Carib Brewery Trinidad Limited, a Trinidad and Tobago brewery, produces a Shandy Sorrel in which the tea is combined with beer.</span></p> <p><span>In Thailand, Roselle is generally drunk as a cool drink,[6] but also as a tea, believed to also reduce cholesterol. It can also be made into a wine.</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus flowers are commonly found in commercial herbal teas, especially teas advertised as berry-flavoured, as they give a bright red colouring to the drink.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella flowers are sold as Wild Hibiscus flowers in syrup in Australia as a gourmet product. Recipes include filling them with goats cheese, serving them on baguette slices baked with brie, &amp; placing one plus a little syrup, in a champagne flute before adding the champagne when the bubbles cause the flower to open.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Jam and preserves</strong></span></p> <p><span>In Nigeria, rosella jam has been made since Colonial times and is still sold regularly at community fetes and charity stalls. It is similar in flavour to plum jam, although more acidic. It differs from other jams in that the pectin is obtained from boiling the interior buds of the rosella flowers. It is thus possible to make rosella jam with nothing but rosella buds and sugar. Roselle is also used in Nigeria to make a refreshing drink known as Zobo.</span></p> <p><span>In Burma, the buds of the roselle are made into 'preserved fruits' or jams. Depending on the method and the preference, the seeds are either removed or included. The jams, made from roselle buds and sugar, are red and tangy.</span></p> <p><span>"Sorrel jelly" is manufactured in Trinidad.</span></p> <p><span>Rosella Jam is also made in Queensland, Australia as a home-made or speciality product sold at fetes and other community events.[7]</span></p> <p><span><strong>Medicinal uses</strong></span></p> <p><span>Many parts of the plant are also claimed to have various medicinal values. They have been used for such purposes ranging from Mexico through Africa and India to Thailand. Roselle is associated with traditional medicine and is reported to be used as treatment for several diseases such as hypertension and urinary tract infections.[8]</span></p> <p><span>Although Roselle has well documented hypotensive effects,[9] there is currently insufficient evidence to support the benefit of Roselle for either controlling or lowering blood pressure due to a lack of well designed studies that measure the efficacy of Roselle on patients with hypertension.[10]</span></p> <p><span>A double blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial was conducted to determine the effect of Roselle leaf extract on a group of 60 subjects with serum LDL values in the range of 130-190 ml/dl (&lt;130 ml/dl is a goal value for most patients[11]) and no history of coronary heart disease. The experimental group received 1g of Roselle leaf extract while the placebo group received a similar amount of maltodextrin in addition to dietary and physical activity advice. Both groups had decreases in body weight, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides that can likely be attributed to the dietary and physical activity advice. At a dose of 1g/day, Roselle leaf extract did not appear to have a blood lipid lowering effect.[12]</span></p> <p><span>Hibiscus sabdariffa has shown in vitro antimicrobial activity against E. coli.[13] A recent review stated that specific extracts of H. sabdariffa exhibit activities against atherosclerosis, liver disease, cancer, diabetes and other metabolic syndromes.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Phytochemicals</strong></span></p> <p><span>The plants are rich in anthocyanins, as well as protocatechuic acid. The dried calyces contain the flavonoids gossypetin, hibiscetine and sabdaretine. The major pigment, formerly reported as hibiscin, has been identified as daphniphylline. Small amounts of myrtillin (delphinidin 3-monoglucoside), Chrysanthenin (cyanidin 3-monoglucoside), and delphinidin are also present. Roselle seeds are a good source of lipid-soluble antioxidants, particularly gamma-tocopherol.[15]</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><strong>Production</strong></span></p> <p><span>China and Thailand are the largest producers and control much of the world supply. Thailand invested heavily in roselle production and their product is of superior quality, whereas China's product, with less stringent quality control practices, is less reliable and reputable. The world's best roselle comes from the Sudan, but the quantity is low and poor processing hampers quality. Mexico, Egypt, Senegal, Tanzania, Mali and Jamaica are also important suppliers but production is mostly used domestically.[16]</span></p> <p><span>In the Indian subcontinent (especially in the Ganges Delta region), roselle is cultivated for vegetable fibres. Roselle is called meśta (or meshta, the ś indicating an sh sound) in the region. Most of its fibres are locally consumed. However, the fibre (as well as cuttings or butts) from the roselle plant has great demand in various natural fibre using industries.</span></p> <p><span>Roselle is a relatively new crop to create an industry in Malaysia. It was introduced in early 1990s and its commercial planting was first promoted in 1993 by the Department of Agriculture in Terengganu. The planted acreage was 12.8 ha (30 acres) in 1993, but had steadily increased to peak at 506 ha (1,000 acres) in 2000. The planted area is now less than 150 ha (400 acres) annually, planted with two main varieties.[citation needed] Terengganu state used to be the first and the largest producer, but now the production has spread more to other states. Despite the dwindling hectarage over the past decade or so, roselle is becoming increasingly known to the general population as an important pro-health drink in the country. To a small extent, the calyces are also processed into sweet pickle, jelly and jam. jimmon rubillos</span></p> <p><span><strong>Crop research</strong></span></p> <p><span>In the initial years, limited research work were conducted by University Malaya (UM) and Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI). Research work at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) was initiated in 1999. In many respect, the amount of research work is still considered meagre in supporting a growing roselle industry in Malaysia.</span></p> <p><span>Crop genetic resources &amp; improvement[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase the crop productivity. Being an introduced species in Malaysia, there is a very limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. At present, UKM maintains a working germplasm collection, and also conducts agronomic research and crop improvement.</span></p> <p><span>Mutation breeding[edit]</span></p> <p><span>Genetic variation is important for plant breeders to increase its productivity. Being an introduced crop species in Malaysia, there is a limited number of germplasm accessions available for breeding. Furthermore, conventional hybridization is difficult to carry out in roselle due to its cleistogamous nature of reproduction. Because of this, a mutation breeding programme was initiated to generate new genetic variability.[17] The use of induced mutations for its improvement was initiated in 1999 in cooperation with MINT (now called Malaysian Nuclear Agency), and has produced some promising breeding lines. Roselle is a tetraploid species; thus, segregating populations require longer time to achieve fixation as compared to diploid species. In April 2009, UKM launched three new varieties named UKMR-1, UKMR-2 and UKMR-3, respectively. These three new varieties were developed using variety Arab as the parent variety in a mutation breeding programme which started in 2006.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Natural outcrossing under local conditions</strong></span></p> <p><span>A study was conducted to estimate the amount of outcrossing under local conditions in Malaysia. It was found that outcrossing occurred at a very low rate of about 0.02%. However, this rate is much lower in comparison to estimates of natural cross-pollination of between 0.20% and 0.68% as reported in Jamaica.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Source: Wikipedia</strong></span></p>
MHS 19
Roselle Seeds - Edible and tasty