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Black Goji Berry - Russian Box Thorn Seeds 1.85 - 3

Black Goji Berry Seeds...

Ár 1,85 € SKU: V 36 B
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black Goji Berry Seeds (Lycium ruthenicum murr)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong><strong><br /></strong></span></h2> <p>Lycium ruthenicum (Chinese: 柴桦; pinyin: chai hua), commonly known as Russian Box Thorn is a species of flowering plant in the nightshade family which can be found in Central Asia, the southern part of Russia, throughout Northwest China, and Pakistan.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The species is either 1.8 centimetres (0.71 in), 20–50 centimetres (7.9–19.7 in), 20–150 centimetres (7.9–59.1 in), or 180 centimetres (71 in) tall. The leaves are either 5–30 millimetres (0.20–1.18 in), 0.6–2.5 centimetres (0.24–0.98 in), or 6–25 millimetres (0.24–0.98 in) by 1–1.5 millimetres (0.039–0.059 in). It has 2-4 sepals each one of which is bell-shaped and 3–4 millimetres (0.12–0.16 in) long. Pedicels are either 5–10 millimetres (0.20–0.39 in) long or can be as long as it sepals. The calyx is 2.5–3.5 millimetres (0.098–0.138 in) long but can be campanulate and exceed 4–5 millimetres (0.16–0.20 in). Corolla's tube is 5–7 millimetres (0.20–0.28 in) long with stamens have 5–8 millimetres (0.20–0.31 in) long berries (which can sometimes grow up to 9 millimetres (0.35 in)) which are also broad and globose. The fruits' seeds are brown coloured and are 1.5–2 millimetres (0.059–0.079 in) long. The flowering time is June to August but can sometimes bloom in May too. Fruits bloom from August to October.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and uses</strong></p> <p>In India, it grows in Kashmir where it is used by native people to cure blindness in camels. In Central Asia and Northwest China, the species grows on the elevation of 400–3,000 metres (1,300–9,800 ft)[1] in saline deserts, sands and roadsides.</p>
V 36 B (10 S)
Black Goji Berry - Russian Box Thorn Seeds 1.85 - 3

Best seller product
Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature

Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds -...

Ár 3,00 € SKU: V 22 M
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/indian-dwarf-papaya-seeds-paw-paw-miniature.html" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Tropical Dwarf Papaya is fast-growing papaya it only reaches 170 cm to 200 cm but bears fruits as large as 1 kg in 6-8 months from seed.</strong></a></p> <p>Papaya (Carica papaya L.) - Deliciously sweet with musky undertones and a soft, butter-like consistency, it is no wonder the papaya was reputably called the "fruit of the angels" by Christopher Columbus. Once considered quite exotic, they can now be found in markets throughout the year. Although there is a slight seasonal peak in early summer and fall, papaya trees produce fruit year-round.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are fruits that remind us of the tropics, the regions of the world in which they are grown. Once considered an exotic fruit, papayas' rise in popularity has made them much more available. Papaya fruits are good sources of Vitamin A, B, and C.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papayas are spherical or pear-shaped fruits that can be as long as 20 inches. The ones commonly found in the market usually average about 7 inches and weigh about one pound. Their flesh is a rich orange color with either yellow or pink hues.&nbsp;</p> <p>Papaya has a wonderfully soft, butter-like consistency and a deliciously sweet, musky taste. Inside the inner cavity of the fruit are black, round seeds encased in a gelatinous-like substance. Papaya's seeds are edible, although their peppery flavor is somewhat bitter.&nbsp;</p> <p>The fruit, as well as the other parts of the papaya tree, contain papain, an enzyme that helps digest proteins. This enzyme is especially concentrated in the fruit when it is unripe. Papain is extracted to make digestive enzyme dietary supplements and is also used as an ingredient in some chewing gums.&nbsp;</p> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/indian-dwarf-papaya-seeds-paw-paw-miniature.html" target="_blank" title="How To Grow Papaya From Seed" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>How To Grow Papaya From Seed</strong></a></h2> <p>Select a sunny and sheltered place in your garden. That's right, in your garden. Don't start them in pots!</p> <p>Papayas don't transplant well. Anything that disturbs the roots of papayas really sets them back. They just hate it. The most foolproof way to grow papayas is to simply plant them where they are to live.</p> <p>Papaya trees are very, very hungry. That means they need very good soil, rich in organic matter and nutrients.</p> <p>If you don't have fabulous soil, make some. Dig a hole half a meter across and fill it with a mix of good compost and soil. Actually, make at least two or three such planting beds in different locations.</p> <p>Now sprinkle on some of your seeds. A couple of dozen per bed is a good amount. Cover the seeds lightly with more compost, and then mulch the patch well. The seeds usually take about a couple of weeks to germinate and may take longer.</p> <p>Soon you will notice that your seedlings are very different in size and vigor. That's why we planted so many. Start culling the weaker ones. Pull them out while still small, or cut bigger ones down to the ground. Only keep the very best.</p> <p>At this stage, you should keep about half a dozen plants. Papaya plants can be male, female, or bisexual, and you want to make sure that you have some females or bisexual plants amongst your seedlings. The male papayas don't bear fruit.</p> <p>Papayas start flowering when they are about one meter tall. The male's flower first. Male flowers have long, thin stalks with several small blooms. Female flowers are usually single blooms, bigger, and very close to the trunk.&nbsp;</p> <p>Cull most of the male plants. You only need one male for every ten to fifteen female plants to ensure good pollination.</p> <p>And that's it. You should end up with one very strong and healthy female plant per bed. (And a male plant somewhere...) If the weather is warm enough, and if you are growing your papayas in full sun and in good soil, then you could be picking the first ripe fruit within 10 months.</p> <h3>How much water?</h3> <p>Papayas have large soft leaves. They evaporate a lot of water in warm weather, so they need a lot of water. But unfortunately, papayas are very susceptible to root rot, especially in cool weather. Overwatering is the most common reason for problems when growing papayas.</p> <p>It depends on the temperature and on the overall health and vigor of the plant. A healthier plant will cope better, but in general, you should be careful not to overwater during periods of cool weather.</p> <h3>Growing Papaya In Cooler Climates</h3> <p>If you get at least long hot summers you could grow papaya just as an ornamental plant. In this case, you would start them in a pot indoors to gain extra time. Plant them out against a sun-facing wall and enjoy the tropical look. However, you won't be able to keep your papaya alive long enough to get fruit.</p> <p>The only other option is growing papaya in a huge pot, and to keep the pot in a heated greenhouse in winter. You may also grow papaya as an annual decorative plant.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">about 25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">regular watering during the growth period + dry between waterings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
V 22 M
Indian Dwarf Papaya Seeds - Paw Paw Miniature

Sugarcane or Sugar Cane Seeds (Saccharum officinarum) 3.5 - 1

Sugarcane or Sugar Cane...

Ár 3,50 € SKU: MHS 11
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sugarcane or Sugar Cane Seeds (Saccharum officinarum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Sugarcane, or sugar cane, is one (Saccharum officinarum) of the several species of tall perennial true grasses of the genus Saccharum, tribe Andropogoneae, native to the warm temperate to tropical regions of South Asia and Melanesia, and used for sugar production. It has stout, jointed, fibrous stalks that are rich in the sugar sucrose, which accumulates in the stalk internodes. The plant is 2 to 6 m (6 ft 7 in to 19 ft 8 in) tall. All sugar cane species interbreed and the major commercial cultivars are complex hybrids. Sugarcane belongs to the grass family Poaceae, an economically important seed plant family that includes maize, wheat, rice, and sorghum, and many forage crops.</p> <p>Sucrose, extracted and purified in specialized mill factories, is used as raw material in human food industries or is fermented to produce ethanol. Ethanol is produced on a large scale by the Brazilian sugarcane industry. Sugarcane is the world's largest crop by production quantity.[1] In 2012, The Food and Agriculture Organization estimates it was cultivated on about 26×106 hectares (6.4×107 acres), in more than 90 countries, with a worldwide harvest of 1.83×109 tonnes (1.80×109 long tons; 2.02×109 short tons). Brazil was the largest producer of sugar cane in the world. The next five major producers, in decreasing amounts of production, were India, China, Thailand, Pakistan, and Mexico.</p> <p>The world demand for sugar is the primary driver of sugarcane agriculture. Cane accounts for 80% of sugar produced; most of the rest is made from sugar beets. Sugarcane predominantly grows in the tropical and subtropical regions (sugar beets grow in colder temperate regions). Other than sugar, products derived from sugarcane include falernum, molasses, rum, cachaça (a traditional spirit from Brazil), bagasse, and ethanol. In some regions, people use sugarcane reeds to make pens, mats, screens, and thatch. The young, unexpanded inflorescence of tebu telor is eaten raw, steamed, or toasted, and prepared in various ways in certain island communities of Indonesia.</p> <p>The Persians, followed by the Greeks, discovered the famous "reeds that produce honey without bees" in India between the 6th and 4th centuries BC. They adopted and then spread sugarcane agriculture.[3] Merchants began to trade in sugar from India, which was considered a luxury and an expensive spice. In the 18th century AD, sugarcane plantations began in Caribbean, South American, Indian Ocean and Pacific island nations and the need for laborers became a major driver of large human migrations, including slave labor[4] and indentured servants.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Sugarcane is a tropical, perennial grass that forms lateral shoots at the base to produce multiple stems, typically three to four m (10 to 13 ft) high and about 5 cm (2 in) in diameter. The stems grow into cane stalk, which when mature constitutes around 75% of the entire plant. A mature stalk is typically composed of 11–16% fiber, 12–16% soluble sugars, 2–3% nonsugars, and 63–73% water. A sugarcane crop is sensitive to the climate, soil type, irrigation, fertilizers, insects, disease control, varieties, and the harvest period. The average yield of cane stalk is 60–70 tonnes per hectare (24–28 long ton/acre; 27–31 short ton/acre) per year. However, this figure can vary between 30 and 180 tonnes per hectare depending on knowledge and crop management approach used in sugarcane cultivation. Sugarcane is a cash crop, but it is also used as livestock fodder.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Sugarcane is indigenous to tropical South and Southeast Asia.[8] Different species likely originated in different locations, with Saccharum barberi originating in India and S. edule and S. officinarum in New Guinea.[8] It is theorized that sugarcane was first domesticated as a crop in New Guinea around 6000 BC.[9] New Guinean farmers and other early cultivators of sugarcane chewed the plant for its sweet juice. Early farmers in Southeast Asia, and elsewhere, may have also boiled the cane juice down to a viscous mass to facilitate transportation, but the earliest known production of crystalline sugar began in northern India. The exact date of the first cane sugar production is unclear. The earliest evidence of sugar production comes from ancient Sanskrit and Pali texts.[10]</p> <p>Around the 8th century, Arab traders introduced sugar from South Asia to the other parts of the Abbasid Caliphate in the Mediterranean, Mesopotamia, Egypt, North Africa, and Andalusia. By the 10th century, sources state that no village in Mesopotamia did not grow sugarcane.[7] It was among the early crops brought to the Americas by the Spanish, mainly Andalusians, from their fields in the Canary Islands, and the Portuguese from their fields in the Madeira Islands.</p> <p>Christopher Columbus first brought sugarcane to the Caribbean during his second voyage to the Americas; initially to the island of Hispaniola (modern day Haiti and the Dominican Republic). In colonial times, sugar formed one side of the triangle trade of New World raw materials, along with European manufactured goods, and African slaves. Sugar (often in the form of molasses) was shipped from the Caribbean to Europe or New England, where it was used to make rum. The profits from the sale of sugar were then used to purchase manufactured goods, which were then shipped to West Africa, where they were bartered for slaves. The slaves were then brought back to the Caribbean to be sold to sugar planters. The profits from the sale of the slaves were then used to buy more sugar, which was shipped to Europe.</p> <p>France found its sugarcane islands so valuable that it effectively traded its portion of Canada, famously dubbed "a few acres of snow", to Britain for their return of Guadeloupe, Martinique and St. Lucia at the end of the Seven Years' War. The Dutch similarly kept Suriname, a sugar colony in South America, instead of seeking the return of the New Netherlands (New York).</p> <p>Boiling houses in the 17th through 19th centuries converted sugarcane juice into raw sugar. These houses were attached to sugar plantations in the Western colonies. Slaves often ran the boiling process under very poor conditions. Rectangular boxes of brick or stone served as furnaces, with an opening at the bottom to stoke the fire and remove ashes. At the top of each furnace were up to seven copper kettles or boilers, each one smaller and hotter than the previous one. The cane juice began in the largest kettle. The juice was then heated and lime added to remove impurities. The juice was skimmed and then channeled to successively smaller kettles. The last kettle, the "teache", was where the cane juice became syrup. The next step was a cooling trough, where the sugar crystals hardened around a sticky core of molasses. This raw sugar was then shoveled from the cooling trough into hogsheads (wooden barrels), and from there into the curing house.</p> <p>In the British Empire, slaves were liberated after 1833 and many would no longer work on sugarcane plantations when they had a choice. British owners of sugarcane plantations therefore needed new workers, and they found cheap labour in China, Portugal and India.[11][12] The people were subject to indenture, a long-established form of contract which bound them to forced labour for a fixed term; apart from the fixed term of servitude, this resembled slavery.[13] The first ships carrying indentured labourers from India left in 1836.[14] The migrations to serve sugarcane plantations led to a significant number of ethnic Indians, southeast Asians and Chinese settling in various parts of the world.[15] In some islands and countries, the South Asian migrants now constitute between 10 to 50 percent of the population. Sugarcane plantations and Asian ethnic groups continue to thrive in countries such as Fiji, Natal, Burma, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, British Guiana, Jamaica, Trinidad, Martinique, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, St. Kitts, St. Croix, Suriname, Nevis, and Mauritius.</p> <p>The then British colony of Queensland, now a state of Australia, imported between 55,000 and 62,500 (estimates vary) people from the South Pacific Islands to work on sugarcane plantations between 1863 and 1900.</p> <p>Cuban sugar derived from sugarcane was exported to the USSR, where it received price supports and was ensured a guaranteed market. The 1991 dissolution of the Soviet state forced the closure of most of Cuba's sugar industry.</p> <p>Sugarcane remains an important part of the economy of Guyana, Belize, Barbados, and Haiti, along with the Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, and other islands.</p> <p>About 70% of the sugar produced globally comes from S. officinarum and hybrids using this species.</p> <h2>Cultivation</h2> <p>Sugarcane cultivation requires a tropical or temperate climate, with a minimum of 60 cm (24 in) of annual moisture. It is one of the most efficient photosynthesizers in the plant kingdom. It is a C4 plant, able to convert up to 1% of incident solar energy into biomass.[19] In prime growing regions, such as Mauritius, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, India, Guyana, Indonesia, Pakistan, Peru, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Australia, Ecuador, Cuba, the Philippines, El Salvador, Jamaica, and Hawaii, sugarcane crops can produce over 15 kg/m2 of cane. Once a major crop of the southeastern region of the United States, sugarcane cultivation has declined there in recent decades, and is now primarily confined to Florida and Louisiana.</p> <p>Sugarcane is cultivated in the tropics and subtropics in areas with a plentiful supply of water, for a continuous period of more than 6-7 months each year, either from natural rainfall or through irrigation. The crop does not tolerate severe frosts. Therefore, most of the world's sugarcane is grown between 22°N and 22°S, and some up to 33°N and 33°S.[20] When sugarcane crop is found outside this range, such as the Natal region of South Africa, it is normally due to anomalous climatic conditions in the region, such as warm ocean currents that sweep down the coast. In terms of altitude, sugarcane crop is found up to 1,600 m close to the equator in countries such as Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.</p> <p>Sugarcane can be grown on many soils ranging from highly fertile well-drained mollisols, through heavy cracking vertisols, infertile acid oxisols, peaty histosols, to rocky andisols. Both plentiful sunshine and water supplies increase cane production. This has made desert countries with good irrigation facilities such as Egypt some of the highest-yielding sugarcane-cultivating regions.</p> <p>Although sugarcanes produce seeds, modern stem cutting has become the most common reproduction method. Each cutting must contain at least one bud, and the cuttings are sometimes hand-planted. In more technologically advanced countries like the United States and Australia, billet planting is common. Billets harvested from a mechanical harvester are planted by a machine that opens and recloses the ground. Once planted, a stand can be harvested several times; after each harvest, the cane sends up new stalks, called ratoons. Successive harvests give decreasing yields, eventually justifying replanting. Two to 10 harvests are usually made depending on the type of culture. In a country with a mechanical agriculture looking for a high production of large fields, like in North America, sugar canes are replanted after two or three harvests to avoid a lowering in yields. In countries with a more traditional type of agriculture with smaller fields and hand harvesting, like in the French island la Réunion, sugar canes are often harvested up to 10 years before replanting.</p> <p>Sugarcane is harvested by hand and mechanically. Hand harvesting accounts for more than half of production, and is dominant in the developing world. In hand harvesting, the field is first set on fire. The fire burns dry leaves, and chases away or kills any lurking venomous snakes, without harming the stalks and roots. Harvesters then cut the cane just above ground-level using cane knives or machetes. A skilled harvester can cut 500 kg (1,100 lb) of sugarcane per hour.</p> <p>Mechanical harvesting uses a combine, or sugarcane harvester.[22] The Austoft 7000 series, the original modern harvester design, has now been copied by other companies, including Cameco / John Deere. The machine cuts the cane at the base of the stalk, strips the leaves, chops the cane into consistent lengths and deposits it into a transporter following alongside. The harvester then blows the trash back onto the field. Such machines can harvest 100 long tons (100 t) each hour; however, harvested cane must be rapidly processed. Once cut, sugarcane begins to lose its sugar content, and damage to the cane during mechanical harvesting accelerates this decline. This decline is offset because a modern chopper harvester can complete the harvest faster and more efficiently than hand cutting and loading. Austoft also developed a series of hydraulic high-lift infield transporters to work alongside their harvesters to allow even more rapid transfer of cane to, for example, the nearest railway siding. This mechanical harvesting doesn't require the field to be set on fire; the remains left in the field by the machine consist of the top of the sugar cane and the dead leaves, which act as mulch for the next round of planting.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Pests</strong></p> <p>The cane beetle (also known as cane grub) can substantially reduce crop yield by eating roots; it can be controlled with imidacloprid (Confidor) or chlorpyrifos (Lorsban). Other important pests are the larvae of some butterfly/moth species, including the turnip moth, the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis), the Mexican rice borer (Eoreuma loftini); leaf-cutting ants, termites, spittlebugs (especially Mahanarva fimbriolata and Deois flavopicta), and the beetle Migdolus fryanus. The planthopper insect Eumetopina flavipes acts as a virus vector, which causes the sugarcane disease ramu stunt.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Pathogens</strong></p> <p>Numerous pathogens infect sugarcane, such as sugarcane grassy shoot disease caused by Phytoplasma, whiptail disease or sugarcane smut, pokkah boeng caused by Fusarium moniliforme, Xanthomonas axonopodis bacteria causes Gumming Disease, and red rot disease caused by Colletotrichum falcatum. Viral diseases affecting sugarcane include sugarcane mosaic virus, maize streak virus, and sugarcane yellow leaf virus.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Nitrogen fixation</strong></p> <p>Some sugarcane varieties are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen in association with the bacterium Glucoacetobacter diazotrophicus.[24] Unlike legumes and other nitrogen-fixing plants that form root nodules in the soil in association with bacteria, G. diazotrophicus lives within the intercellular spaces of the sugarcane's stem.[25][26] Coating seeds with the bacteria is a newly developed technology that can enable every crop species to fix nitrogen for its own use.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Conditions for sugarcane workers</strong></p> <p>At least 20,000 people are estimated to have died of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Central America in the past two decades – most of them sugar cane workers along the Pacific coast. This may be due to working long hours in the heat without adequate fluid intake.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Processing</strong></p> <p>Traditionally, sugarcane processing requires two stages. Mills extract raw sugar from freshly harvested cane and "mill-white” sugar is sometimes produced immediately after the first stage at sugar-extraction mills, intended for local consumption. Sugar crystals appear naturally in white color during the crystallization process. Sulfur dioxide is added to inhibit the formation of color-inducing molecules as well as to stabilize the sugar juices during evaporation.[29][30] Refineries, often located nearer to consumers in North America, Europe, and Japan, then produce refined white sugar, which is 99 percent sucrose. These two stages are slowly merging. Increasing affluence in the sugar-producing tropics increased demand for refined sugar products, driving a trend toward combined milling and refining.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Sugarcane as food</strong></p> <p>In most countries where sugarcane is cultivated, there are several foods and popular dishes derived directly from it, such as:</p> <p>Raw sugarcane: chewed to extract the juice</p> <p>Sayur nganten: an Indonesian soup made with the stem of trubuk (Saccharum edule), a type of sugarcane.</p> <p>Sugarcane juice: a combination of fresh juice, extracted by hand or small mills, with a touch of lemon and ice to make a popular drink, known variously as air tebu, usacha rass, guarab, guarapa, guarapo, papelón, aseer asab, ganna sharbat, mosto, caldo de cana, nước miá.</p> <p>Syrup: a traditional sweetener in soft drinks, now largely supplanted in the US by high fructose corn syrup, which is less expensive because of corn subsidies and sugar tariffs.[47]</p> <p>Molasses: used as a sweetener and a syrup accompanying other foods, such as cheese or cookies</p> <p>Jaggery: a solidified molasses, known as gur or gud or gul in India, is traditionally produced by evaporating juice to make a thick sludge, and then cooling and molding it in buckets. Modern production partially freeze dries the juice to reduce caramelization and lighten its color. It is used as sweetener in cooking traditional entrees, sweets and desserts.</p> <p>Falernum: a sweet, and lightly alcoholic drink made from sugarcane juice</p> <p>Cachaça: the most popular distilled alcoholic beverage in Brazil; a liquor made of the distillation of sugarcane juice.</p> <p>Rum: is a liquor made from sugarcane products, typically molasses but sometimes also cane juice. It is most commonly produced in the Caribbean and environs.</p> <p>Basi: is a fermented alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane juice produced in the Philippines and Guyana.</p> <p>Panela: solid pieces of sucrose and fructose obtained from the boiling and evaporation of sugarcane juice; a food staple in Colombia and other countries in South and Central America</p> <p>Rapadura: a sweet flour that is one of the simplest refinings of sugarcane juice, common in Latin American countries such as Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela (where it is known as papelón) and the Caribbean.</p> <p>Rock candy: crystallized cane juice</p> <p>Gâteau de Sirop</p>
MHS 11 (10 S)
Sugarcane or Sugar Cane Seeds (Saccharum officinarum) 3.5 - 1
Spanish broom Seeds...

Spanish broom Seeds...

Ár 1,75 € SKU: T 85
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Spanish broom Seeds (Spartium junceum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Spartium junceum, the Spanish broom, rush broom, or weaver's broom, is a species of flowering plant in the family Fabaceae.</p> <p>It is the sole species in the genus Spartium, but is closely related to the other brooms in the genera Cytisus and Genista. There are many binomials in Spartium that are of dubious validity (see below).</p> <p>The Latin specific epithet junceum means "rush-like", referring to the shoots, which show a passing resemblance to those of the rush genus Juncus.</p> <p>Distribution and habitat<br />This species is native to the Mediterranean in southern Europe, southwest Asia, and northwest Africa, where it is found in sunny sites, usually on dry, sandy soils.</p> <p>Description<br />S. junceum is a vigorous, deciduous shrub growing to 2–4 m (7–13 ft) tall, rarely 5 m (16 ft), with main stems up to 5 cm (2 in) thick, rarely 10 cm (4 in). It has thick, somewhat succulent grey-green rush-like shoots with very sparse small deciduous leaves 1 to 3 cm long and up to 4 mm broad. The leaves are of little importance to the plant, with much of the photosynthesis occurring in the green shoots (a water-conserving strategy in its dry climate). The leaves fall away early.[9] In late spring and summer shoots are covered in profuse fragrant yellow pea-like flowers 1 to 2 cm across. In late summer, the legumes (seed pods) mature black and reach 8–10 cm (3–4 in) long. They burst open, often with an audible crack, spreading seed from the parent plant.</p> <p>Invasive species<br />Spartium junceum has been widely introduced into other areas and is regarded as a noxious invasive species in places with a Mediterranean climate such as California and Oregon, Hawaii, central Chile, southeastern Australia, the Western Cape in South Africa and the Canary Islands and Azores. It was first introduced to California as an ornamental plant.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong><br />The plant is used as an ornamental plant in gardens and in landscape plantings. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</p> <p>In Bolivia and Peru, the plant is known as retama, (not to be confused with the genus Retama), and has become very well established in some areas. It is one of the most common ornamental plants, often seen growing along sidewalks in La Paz.</p> <p>Retama has made its way into the ethnobotany of the indigenous Aymara and Quechua cultures.</p> <p>The plant is also used as a flavoring, and for its essential oil, known as genetic absolute. Its fibers have been used for cloth and it produces a yellow dye.</p>
T 85 (10 S)
Spanish broom Seeds (Spartium junceum)

Ennek a növénynek óriási gyümölcsei vannak

Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11

Giant Water Lily Lotus...

Ár 2,25 € SKU: F 78
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0606; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Queen of the water lilies, this Amazonian giant has a remarkable life cycle.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica is well known for its huge circular leaves, which are often pictured with a small child sitting supported in the centre as a demonstration of their size and strength. The species is highly prized as an ornamental, despite having somewhat particular requirements for successful cultivation.</span></p> <p><span>Victoria Amazonica seeds from Thailand that have a perfectly can grow every weather that have a very big size most 3.5 metre. The seeds very fresh easy for grow the most quality 85%. Every seeds had quality cue in with thoroughly.</span></p> <h2><span>How To Grow Victoria amazonica Seeds</span></h2> <p><span>Put the seeds in to washtub and wait 5 weeks.</span></p> <p><span>When the roots thrown out and flowers thrive then after that put the underground and wait for until the lotus grow up.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>WIKIPEDIA:</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Victoria amazonica is a species of flowering plant, the largest of the Nymphaeaceae family of water lilies. It is the National flower of Guyana.</span></p> <p><span>The species has very large leaves, up to 3 m in diameter, that float on the water's surface on a submerged stalk, 7–8 m in length. The species was once called Victoria regia after Queen Victoria, but the name was superseded. V. amazonica is native to the shallow waters of the Amazon River basin, such as oxbow lakes and bayous. It is depicted in the Guyanese coat of arms. The flowers are white the first night they are open and become pink the second night. They are up to 40 cm in diameter, and are pollinated by beetles. This process was described in detail by Sir Ghillean Prance and Jorge Arius.[4][5]It is the largest waterlily in the world.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Classification</span></strong></p> <p><span>A member of the genus Victoria placed in the Nymphaeaceae family or, sometimes, in the Euryalaceae.[6] The first published description of the genus was by John Lindley in October 1837, based on specimens of this plant returned from British Guiana by Robert Schomburgk. Lindley named the genus after the newly ascended Queen Victoria, and the species Victoria regia.[1] The spelling in Schomburgk's description in Athenaeum, published the month before, was given as Victoria Regina.[2] Despite this spelling being adopted by the Botanical Society of London for their new emblem, Lindley's was the version used throughout the nineteenth century.</span></p> <p><span>An earlier account of the species, Euryale amazonica by Eduard Friedrich Poeppig, in 1832 described an affinity with Euryale ferox. A collection and description was also made by the French botanist Aimé Bonpland in 1825.[1][1][8] In 1850 James De Carle Sowerby[9] recognised Poeppig's earlier description and transferred its epithet amazonica. The new name was rejected by Lindley. The current name, Victoria amazonica, did not come into widespread use until the twentieth century.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>Victoria regia, as it was named, was discovered by Tadeáš Haenke in 1801.[10] It was once the subject of rivalry between Victorian gardeners in England. Always on the look out for a spectacular new species with which to impress their peers, Victorian "Gardeners"[11] such as the Duke of Devonshire, and the Duke of Northumberland started a well-mannered competition to become the first to cultivate and bring to flower this enormous lily. In the end, the two aforementioned Dukes became the first to achieve this, Joseph Paxton (for the Duke of Devonshire) being the first in November 1849 by replicating the lily's warm swampy habitat (not easy in winter in England with only coal-fired boilers for heating), and a "Mr Ivison" the second and more constantly successful (for Northumberland) at Syon House.</span></p> <p><span>The species captured the imagination of the public, and was the subject of several dedicated monographs. The botanical illustrations of cultivated specimens in Fitch and W.J. Hooker's 1851 work Victoria Regia[12] received critical acclaim in the Athenaeum, "they are accurate, and they are beautiful".[13] The Duke of Devonshire presented Queen Victoria with one of the first of these flowers, and named it in her honour. The lily, with ribbed undersurface and leaves veining "like transverse girders and supports", was Paxton's inspiration for The Crystal Palace, a building four times the size of St. Peter's in Rome.</span></p> <h2><strong>Video:</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #fc0303;"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkI9-rhumbs" target="_blank" class="btn btn-default" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #fc0303;">How To Grow Lotus From Seeds </span></a></span><br /></strong></h2> </body> </html>
F 78
Giant Water Lily Lotus Seeds (Victoria amazonica) 2.25 - 11
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo...

Ár 1,95 € SKU: B 6
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys bambusoides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly called madake, giant timber bamboo or Japanese timber bamboo, is a bamboo species in the genus Phyllostachys.</p> <p>Madake is typically known for being the most common type of bamboo used in the making of shakuhachi flutes and is utilized in numerous Japanese, as well as Chinese, arts, and crafts.</p> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides can reach a height of 15–22 m and a diameter of 10–15 cm. The culms are dark green, quite thick and very straight. The leaves are dark green. New stalks emerge in late spring and grow quite rapidly, up to 1 meter each day. The flowering interval of this species is very long, about 120 years. This strong plant is in Asia one of the preferred bamboos for building and in the manufacture of furniture.</p> <p>This species is native to China, but it is commonly grown worldwide, especially in Japan.</p> </body> </html>
B 6 (5 S)
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3
Horseradish Seeds (Armoracia rusticana) Seeds Gallery - 9

Horseradish Seeds...

Ár 3,95 € SKU: VE 117 AR
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Horseradish Seeds (Armoracia rusticana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0101;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). It is a root vegetable used as a spice.</span></p> <p><span>The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is popular worldwide. It grows up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root. </span></p> <p><span>The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter tasting over time.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>History</span></strong></h3> <p><span>Horseradish is probably indigenous to temperate Eastern Europe, where its Slavic name chren seemed to Augustin Pyramus de Candolle more primitive than any Western synonym. Horseradish has been cultivated since antiquity.[6] According to Greek mythology, the Delphic Oracle told Apollo that the horseradish was worth its weight in gold. Dioscorides listed horseradish equally as Persicon sinapi (Diosc. 2.186) or Sinapi persicum (Diosc. 2.168),[8] which Pliny's Natural History reported as Persicon napy;[9] Cato discusses the plant in his treatises on agriculture, and a mural in Pompeii shows the plant. Horseradish is probably the plant mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History under the name of Amoracia, and recommended by him for its medicinal qualities, and possibly the wild radish, or raphanos agrios of the Greeks. The early Renaissance herbalists Pietro Andrea Mattioli and John Gerard showed it under Raphanus.[10] Its modern Linnaean genus Armoracia was first applied to it by Heinrich Bernhard Ruppius, in his Flora Jenensis, 1745, but Linnaeus himself called it Coclearia armoracia.</span></p> <p><span>Both root and leaves were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages. The root was used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain. It was introduced to North America during European colonialization;[11] both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson mention horseradish in garden accounts.</span></p> <p><span>William Turner mentions horseradish as Red Cole in his "Herbal" (1551–1568), but not as a condiment. In The Herball, or Generall Historie of Plantes (1597), John Gerard describes it under the name of raphanus rusticanus, stating that it occurs wild in several parts of England. After referring to its medicinal uses, he says:</span></p> <p><span>The Horse Radish stamped with a little vinegar put thereto, is commonly used among the Germans for sauce to eat fish with and such like meats as we do mustard.</span></p> <p><span>The word horseradish is attested in English from the 1590s. It combines the word horse (formerly used in a figurative sense to mean strong or coarse) and the word radish.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>Cultivation</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 2–9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, although not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year's crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinarily useful, although older plants can be dug and re-divided to start new plants.[11][15] The early season leaves can be distinctively different, asymmetric spiky, before the mature typical flat broad leaves start to be developed.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></h2> <p><span>The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 °C (99 °F). Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.</span></p> <p><span>Cooks use the terms "horseradish" or "prepared horseradish" to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It can be stored for months under refrigeration, but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavour and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as "horseradish greens", which have a flavor similar to that of the roots.</span></p> <h2><strong><span>Horseradish sauce</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland.[19] In the UK, it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast; but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: "his wit's as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard" in Henry IV Part II[20]). A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.[citation needed] In France, sauce au raifort is popular in Alsatian cuisine.[citation needed] In Russia horseradish root is usually mixed with grated garlic and small amount of tomatoes for color.</span></p> <p><span>In the US the term "horseradish sauce" refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Vegetable</span></strong></h3> <p><span>In Central and Eastern Europe horseradish is called khren (in various spellings like kren) in many Slavic languages, in Austria, in parts of Germany (where the other German name Meerrettich isn't used), in North-East Italy, and in Yiddish (</span><span>כריין</span><span> transliterated as khreyn).</span></p> <p><span>There are two varieties of khreyn. "Red" khreyn is mixed with red beetroot and "white" khreyn contains no beetroot. It is popular in Ukraine (under the name of хрін, khrin), in Belarus (under the name of хрэн, chren), in Poland (under the name of chrzan), in the Czech Republic (křen), in Russia (хрен, khren), in Hungary (torma), in Romania (hrean), in Lithuania (krienai), in Bulgaria (хрян, khryan), and in Slovakia (under the name of chren). Having this on the table is a part of Christian Easter and Jewish Passover tradition in Eastern and Central Europe.</span></p> <p><span>In parts of Southern Germany like Franconia, "Kren" is an essential component of the traditional wedding dinner. It is served with cooked beef and a dip made from lingonberry to balance the slight hotness of the Kren.</span></p> <p><span>In Poland, a variety with red beetroot is called ćwikła z chrzanem or simply ćwikła.</span></p> <p><span>In Ashkenazi European Jewish cooking beetroot horseradish is commonly served with gefilte fish.</span></p> <p><span>In Transylvania and other Romanian regions, Red beetroot with horseradish is also used as a salad served with lamb dishes at Easter called sfecla cu hrean.</span></p> <p><span>In Serbia, ren is an essential condiment with cooked meat and freshly roasted suckling pig.</span></p> <p><span>In Croatia, freshly grated horseradish (Croatian: Hren) is often eaten with boiled ham or beef.</span></p> <p><span>In Slovenia, and in the adjacent Italian regions of Friuli Venezia Giulia and nearby Italian region of Veneto, horseradish (often grated and mixed with sour cream, vinegar, hard-boiled eggs, or apples) is also a traditional Easter dish.</span></p> <p><span>Further west in the Italian regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, and Piedmont, it is called "barbaforte (strong beard)" and is a traditional accompaniment to bollito misto; while in north-eastern regions like Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, it is still called "kren" or "cren". In the southern region of Basilicata it is known as "rafano" and used for the preparation of the so-called "rafanata", a main course made of horseradish, eggs, cheese and sausage.</span></p> <p><span>Horseradish is also used as a main ingredient for soups. In the Polish region of Silesia, horseradish soup is a common Easter Day dish.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Relation to wasabi</span></strong></h3> <p><span>The Japanese condiment wasabi, although traditionally prepared from the wasabi plant, is now usually made with horseradish due to the scarcity of the wasabi plant.[27] The Japanese botanical name for horseradish is seiyōwasabi (</span><span>セイヨウワサビ</span><span>, </span><span>西洋山葵</span><span>), or "Western wasabi". Both plants are members of the family Brassicaceae.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Nutritional content</span></strong></h3> <p><span>In a 100 gram amount, prepared horseradish provides 48 calories and has high content of vitamin C with moderate content of sodium, folate and dietary fiber, while other essential nutrients are negligible in content. In a typical serving of one tablespoon (15 grams), horseradish supplies no significant nutrient content.</span></p> <p><span>Horseradish contains volatile oils, notably mustard oil, and allyl isothiocyanate.</span></p> <h3><strong><span>Biomedical uses</span></strong></h3> <p><span>The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology and biochemistry primarily for its ability to amplify a weak signal and increase detectability of a target molecule. HRP has been used in decades of research to visualize under microscopy and assess non-quantitatively the permeability of capillaries, particularly those of the brain.</span></p> <h2><em><strong>How to Grow Horseradish from Seed</strong></em></h2> <h3><strong>Timing</strong></h3> <p>For first season harvests, start the seeds indoors in January to February and transplant out in April. The goal is to achieve large, fully established roots that can be divided and/or replanted. If time is not pressing, direct sow any time from March into summer. Optimal soil temperature: 7-23°C (45-75°F).</p> <h3><strong>Starting</strong></h3> <p>Sow seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½”) deep in well cultivated, deep soiil. Seeds will sprout in 7-25 days, depending on conditions. Thin or transplant to 20cm (8″) apart in rows 40-50cm (16-20″) apart.</p> <h3><strong>Growing</strong></h3> <p>Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. Well drained, warm soil in full sun is best. Raised beds help with both drainage and warmth. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10′) of row. Newly emerged leaves are edible, or should be left to mature if growing for the roots. The flower petals are also edible — flowers should be removed before they set seeds, as they will self-sow with enthusiasm.</p> <h3><strong>Harvest</strong></h3> <p>For the leaves, harvest as needed, shortly after they emerge, before they become woody. For the roots, harvest November through March. The roots can also be lifted and stored for spring planting to keep the crop going from season to season.</p> <h3><strong>Diseases &amp; Pests</strong></h3> <p>In our experience, insects do not cause problems for horseradish.</p> <h3><strong>Companion Planting</strong></h3> <p>Horseradish is thought to repel aphids and whiteflies, blister beetles, potato beetles, and some varieties of caterpillar. Its flowers attract beneficial predatory hoverflies.</p> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/wasabi-seeds-wasabia-japonica-eutrema-japonicum.html" target="_blank" title="Wasabi Seeds you can buy here" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Wasabi Seeds you can buy here</strong></span></a></h2>
VE 117 AR (10 S)
Horseradish Seeds (Armoracia rusticana) Seeds Gallery - 9

Variety from Peru
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6

Purple Corn Seeds - Maíz...

Ár 2,25 € SKU: VE 72
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Corn - Maíz Morado "Kculli" - Purple Maize Seeds</strong> <strong>(Zea mays amylaceaa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0101;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 4,5g (10), 9g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Purple corn, a variety of Zea mays, is an Andean crop from low valleys locally called maiz Morado. Purple corn can be found mostly in Peru, where it is cultivated on the coast, as well as in lands almost ten thousand feet high. There are different varieties of purple corn, and all of them originated from an ancestral line called “Kculli”, still cultivated in Peru. The Kculli line is very old, and ancient objects in the shape of these particular ears of corn have been found in archeological sites at least 2,500 years old in places on the central coast, as well as among the ceramics of the “Mochica” culture.</p> <p>The kernels of purple corn are soaked in hot water by people of the Andes to yield a deep purple color for foods and beverages, a practice now recognized for its industrial uses as a colorant. Common in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru, purple corn is used in chicha Morada, a drink made by boiling ground purple corn kernels with pineapple, cinnamon, clove, and sugar, and in mazamorra, a type of pudding. One of the most popular purple corn food uses is the "Api", a smoothie served hot and sometimes called "Inca's dessert".</p> <p>Purple corn contains substantial amounts of phenolics and anthocyanins, among other phytochemicals. Its main colorant is cianidin-3-b-glucosa. People of the Andes make a refreshing drink from purple corn called "chicha Morada" which is now recognized as a nutritive powerhouse due to its phenolic content. Phenolics are known to have many bioactive and functional properties. Research shows that crops with the highest total phenolic and anthocyanin content also have the highest antioxidant activity.</p> <p>Anthocyaninins are a type of complex flavonoid that produce blue, purple or red colors.&nbsp;</p> <p>Purple Corn has a higher antioxidant capacity and antiradical kinetics than blueberries and higher or similar anthocyanin and phenolic contents.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 72 (4.5g)
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6
Heinz 1350 Tomato Seeds  - 2

1500 mag Heinz 1350 paradicsom

Ár 12,95 € SKU: VT 101 (5g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>1500 mag Heinz 1350 paradicsom</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>1500 (5 g) mag csomagjának ára.</strong></span></h2> <p><span class="VIiyi" jsaction="mouseup:BR6jm" jsname="jqKxS" lang="hu"><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="hu" data-language-to-translate-into="en" data-phrase-index="4" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$207"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Kóstolja meg a klasszikus paradicsom ízt azzal, hogy hozzáadja ezt az örökséget a kertjéhez.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="hu" data-language-to-translate-into="en" data-phrase-index="5" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$208"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Az egyik első Heinz-tenyésztésű paradicsommagfajta, amelyet Heinz ketchup készítéséhez használtak, a Heinz Classic Heirloom paradicsom (más néven Heinz 1370) gazdag paradicsom ízt kínál nagy (kb. 170 g), lédús gyümölcsökben, amelyek ideálisak szendvicsekre szeleteléshez vagy főzéshez</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="hu" data-language-to-translate-into="en" data-phrase-index="6" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$209"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">szószokba vagy pörköltbe.</span></span><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b" data-language-for-alternatives="hu" data-language-to-translate-into="en" data-phrase-index="7" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$210"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb"> </span></span></span></p> <p><span class="VIiyi" jsaction="mouseup:BR6jm" jsname="jqKxS" lang="hu"><span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="hu" data-language-to-translate-into="en" data-phrase-index="8" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$211"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">A növények (120-150 centiméter magasak) sok régióban boldogulnak, és jól alkalmazkodnak a nagy konténerekben történő termesztéshez.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="hu" data-language-to-translate-into="en" data-phrase-index="9" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$212"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">A Heinz Classic Heirloom növények egész évszakon át teremnek, de nyáron érik a termés legnehezebb részét.</span></span> <span jsaction="agoMJf:PFBcW;usxOmf:aWLT7;jhKsnd:P7O7bd,F8DmGf;Q4AGo:Gm7gYd,qAKMYb;uFUCPb:pvnm0e,pfE8Hb,PFBcW;f56efd:dJXsye;EnoYf:KNzws,ZJsZZ,JgVSJc;zdMJQc:cCQNKb,ZJsZZ,zchEXc;Ytrrj:JJDvdc;tNR8yc:GeFvjb;oFN6Ye:hij5Wb" jscontroller="Zl5N8" jsmodel="SsMkhd" jsname="txFAF" class="JLqJ4b ChMk0b" data-language-for-alternatives="hu" data-language-to-translate-into="en" data-phrase-index="10" jsdata="uqLsIf;_;$213"><span jsaction="click:qtZ4nf,GFf3ac,tMZCfe; contextmenu:Nqw7Te,QP7LD; mouseout:Nqw7Te; mouseover:qtZ4nf,c2aHje" jsname="W297wb">Tegye ezeket az erőteljes növényeket a legjobb eredmény és a legegyszerűbb betakarítás érdekében.</span></span></span><span> </span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 101 (5g)
Heinz 1350 Tomato Seeds  - 2

Variety from Hungary
“Zomok” Tomato seeds

Zomok Tomato seeds

Ár 1,60 € SKU: VT 118
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Zomok Tomato seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Zömök tomato is an old Hungarian variety that ripens very early. An extremely prolific heirloom variety is mainly recommended for kitchen gardens. The fruits are quickly growing, round to oval red and weighing 50-60 g.</p> <p>And the flavor? Mild and sweet, and very juicy. The plants grow up to 150 cm, are robust and very high-yielding.</p> <p>They are flavourful and best suitable for salads and for fresh consumption.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 118 (20 S)
“Zomok” Tomato seeds
Bársony Babmag (Mucuna...

Bársony Babmag (Mucuna...

Ár 2,85 € SKU: P 88 MP
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Bársony Babmag (Mucuna pruriens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>5 magos csomag ára.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>Kínálatunkban fehér és fekete magú Mucuna pruriens van. Válasszon a szín opció alatt, a mag színe.</strong></p> <p>A Mucuna pruriens egy trópusi hüvelyes, amely Afrikában és trópusi Ázsiában őshonos, és nagyrészt naturalizált és termesztett. Az angol elnevezések közé tartozik a majom tamarind, a bársony bab, a bengáli bársony bab, a floridai bársony bab, a mauritiusi bársony bab, a Jokohama bársony bab, a cowage, a cowitch, a Lacuna bab és a lyoni bab. A növény ismert a rendkívüli viszketésről, amelyet a fiatal lombokkal és a maghüvelyekkel érintkezve okoz. Mezőgazdasági és kertészeti értéke van, és a gyógynövényekben használják.</p> <p>A növény egy éves mászócserje, hosszú szőlővel, amely meghaladja a 15 métert. Amikor a növény fiatal, szinte teljesen pelyhes haj borítja, idősebb korában azonban szinte teljesen szőrtelen. A levelek hármas csúcsúak, tojásdadok, fordítottan tojásdadok, rombusz alakúak vagy széles ovális alakúak. A levelek oldala gyakran erősen barázdált, a hegyek hegyesek. A fiatal M. pruriens növényekben a levelek mindkét oldalán szőrszálak vannak. A röpcédulák szárai két-három milliméter hosszúak (kb. Egy hüvelyk tizede). További szomszédos levelek vannak és körülbelül 5 milliméter hosszúak.</p> <p>használat</p> <p>A viszketõ bab takarmánynövényként elterjedt a trópusokon. Ebből a célból az egész növényt silózzák, szárítják szénaként vagy a magokat tömény takarmányként. A viszketõ babos szilázs 11–23% nyersfehérjét és 35–40% nyersrostot, a szárított bab 20–35% nyersfehérjét és kevesebb mint 5% nyersrostot tartalmaz. Gyógynövényként is használják. A magokat Parkinson-kóros betegeknél használják L-Dopa tartalmuk miatt.</p> <p>A magokat iparilag is feldolgozzák erre a célra.</p> <p>A pörkölt viszkető bab a kávé élelmiszer-helyettesítőjeként szolgálhat. Friss hajtásokat vagy babot főzve is fogyaszthatunk. Ehhez a növényrészeknek legalább 30 percig forrniuk kell, és előzőleg 48 órán át vízben kell áztatniuk, különben mérgezőek az emberre. Feldolgozatlan bab a nem kérődző állatokra is mérgező. A vad formákban (a M. p. Var. Utilis kivételével minden fajta) a növényi szőrök mukunint tartalmaznak, amely irritálja a bőrt és nagyon kellemetlen viszketést okoz. Emiatt többek között kereskedelmi viszketési porokhoz is használják őket.</p> <p>Állítólag az ájurvédikus gyógyszereknek afrodiziákum hatása van. Azt mondják, hogy hallucinogén hatása is van, ezért a növény egyes részeit időnként hozzáadják Ayahuascához - DMT-t és monoamin-oxidáz-gátlót tartalmazó mámorító italhoz.</p> <p>Egy tanulmány 60 meddő férfit vizsgált meg, akik pszichés stressztől szenvedtek. A vizsgálat során vették a viszketõ babot, a Mucuna pruriens-t, és érezhetõen alacsonyabb stressz-érzéssel és több spermiummal rendelkeztek, mint korábban. A lenyelés stimulálta az antioxidáns védekező rendszert és javította a stresszkezelést.</p> <p></p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 178 B (5 S)
Bársony Babmag (Mucuna pruriens)

Bosnia and Herzegovina variety

Ennek a növénynek óriási gyümölcsei vannak
Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds...

Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds...

Ár 2,55 € SKU: V 197 BS
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds (Prunus domestica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 5 (6,5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This variety is from Bosnia, and very resistant to diseases. We came across this plum by chance at a farmer's yard and were immediately amazed by both the size and taste of this variety.</p> <p>Unfortunately, the owner did not know what the name of the variety was, he only knew how to tell us that this plum variety was planted by his great-grandfather and that since then this plum has been kept and planted regularly so that this variety spreads and preserves as much as possible.</p> <p>We asked him how this plum tolerates winter and low temperatures, and he answered that the temperature in their village drops to minus 24 degrees Celsius, and this was no problem for this plum.</p> <p>The fruits are really huge and weigh an average of 70 to 85 grams per fruit.</p> <p>A plum is a fruit of the subgenus Prunus of the genus Prunus. The subgenus is distinguished from other subgenera (peaches, cherries, bird cherries, etc.) in the shoots having terminal bud and solitary side buds (not clustered), the flowers in groups of one to five together on short stems, and the fruit having a groove running down one side and a smooth stone (or pit).</p> <p>Mature plum fruit may have a dusty-white waxy coating that gives them a glaucous appearance. This is an epicuticular wax coating and is known as "wax bloom". Dried plum fruits are called dried plums or prunes, although, in American English, prunes are a distinct type of plum, and may have pre-dated the fruits now commonly known as plums.</p> <p>Typically it forms a large shrub or a small tree. It may be somewhat thorny, with white blossom, borne in early spring. The oval or spherical fruit varies in size, but can be up to 8 cm across, and is usually sweet (dessert plum), though some varieties are sour and require cooking with sugar to make them palatable. Like all Prunus fruits, it contains a single large seed, usually called a stone, which is discarded when eating.</p> <p>Plums are grown commercially in orchards, but modern rootstocks, together with self-fertile strains, training and pruning methods, allow single plums to be grown in relatively small spaces. Their early flowering and fruiting means that they require a sheltered spot away from frosts and cold winds.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>The taste of the plum fruit ranges from sweet to tart; the skin itself may be particularly tart. It is juicy and can be eaten fresh or used in jam-making or other recipes. Plum juice can be fermented into plum wine. In central England, a cider-like alcoholic beverage known as plum jerkum is made from plums.</p> <p>Dried plums (or prunes) are also sweet and juicy and contain several antioxidants. Plums and prunes are known for their laxative effect. This effect has been attributed to various compounds present in the fruits, such as dietary fiber, sorbitol,[7] and isatin.[8] Prunes and prune juice are often used to help regulate the functioning of the digestive system. Dried prune marketers in the US have, in recent years, begun marketing their product as "dried plums". This is due to "prune" having negative connotations connected with elderly people suffering from constipation.</p> <p>Dried, salted plums are used as a snack, sometimes known as saladito or salao. Various flavors of dried plum are available at Chinese grocers and specialty stores worldwide. They tend to be much drier than the standard prune. Cream, ginseng, spicy, and salty are among the common varieties. Licorice is generally used to intensify the flavor of these plums and is used to make salty plum drinks and toppings for shaved ice or baobing.</p> <p>Pickled plums are another type of preserve available in Asia and international specialty stores. The Japanese variety, called umeboshi, is often used for rice balls, called onigiri or omusubi. The ume, from which umeboshi are made, is more closely related, however, to the apricot than to the plum.</p> <p>As with many other members of the rose family, plum seeds contain cyanogenic glycosides, including amygdalin.[10] These substances are capable of decomposing into a sugar molecule and hydrogen cyanide gas. While plum seeds are not the most toxic within the rose family (the bitter almond is the most toxic[citation needed]), large doses of these chemicals from any source are hazardous to human health. On the other hand, plums are considered a source of phytochemical compounds with beneficial effects on health.</p> <p>Prune kernel oil is made from the fleshy inner part of the pit of the plum.</p> <p>Plums come in a wide variety of colours and sizes. Some are much firmer-fleshed than others, and some have yellow, white, green or red flesh, with equally varying skin colour.</p> <p>Though not available commercially, the wood of plum trees is used by hobbyists and other private woodworkers for musical instruments, knife handles, inlays, and similar small projects.</p> <p>When it flowers in the early spring, a plum tree will be covered in blossoms, and in a good year approximately 50% of the flowers will be pollinated and become plums. Flowering starts after 80 growing degree days.</p> <p>If the weather is too dry, the plums will not develop past a certain stage, but will fall from the tree while still tiny, green buds, and if it is unseasonably wet or if the plums are not harvested as soon as they are ripe, the fruit may develop a fungal condition called brown rot. Brown rot is not toxic, and very small affected areas can be cut out of the fruit, but unless the rot is caught immediately, the fruit will no longer be edible. Plum is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera, including November moth, willow beauty and short-cloaked moth.</p> <p><strong>The Serbian plum (Serbian: шљива / šljiva) is the third most produced in the world. In the Balkans, plum is converted into an alcoholic drink named slivovitz (plum brandy) (Serbian: шљивовица / šljivovica).</strong></p> <p>A large number of plums, of the Damson variety, are also grown in Hungary, where they are called szilva and are used to make lekvar (a plum paste jam), palinka (traditional fruit brandy), plum dumplings, and other foods. The region of Szabolcs-Szatmár, in the northeastern part of the country near the borders with Ukraine and Romania, is a major producer of plums.</p> <p>The plum blossom or meihua (Chinese: 梅花; pinyin: méihuā), along with the peony, are considered traditional floral emblems of China.</p> <p>The plum is commonly used in China, Yunnan area, to produce a local plum wine with a smooth, sweet, fruity taste and approximately 12% alcohol by volume.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 197 BS (6,5g)
Giant Bosnian Plum Seeds (Prunus domestica)