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Syn. Cecei Hungarian Heirloom Pepper Seeds  - 4

Syn. Cecei Hungarian...

Ár 1,75 € SKU: P 27
,
5/ 5
<h2 style="font-family:'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;color:#333333;"><strong>Syn. Cecei Hungarian Heirloom Pepper Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The plant is strong, continuous medium growth, 40-50 cm tall. The development speed is medium and not sensitive to lack of light. The fruit is white, sweet with a pointed tip, slightly ribbed, hanging, conical (about 70 to 100 grams weight). Resistant to tobacco mosaic virus. It is recommended for outdoor cultivation and shoot under the unheated film. Suitable for fresh consumption and processing.</p> <p><strong>In Hungary, this variety is used for stuffed peppers and is one of the favorite varieties for this type of use in the kitchen.</strong></p>
P 27 (20 S)
Syn. Cecei Hungarian Heirloom Pepper Seeds  - 4

Variety from Hungary
Hungarian Tomato Seeds Mano

Hungarian Tomato Seeds Mano

Ár 1,55 € SKU: VT 137
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Hungarian Tomato Seeds Mano</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Mano tomato is a very early, rapidly developing, dwarf-growing Hungarian tomato variety. Its spherical berries weigh an average of 50-60 g, are bright red in color, very juicy, and can be stored for a long time.</p> <p>Mano tomato is an excellent variety for growing in open fields and in pots.</p> <p>Excellent home garden tomato for fresh consumption.</p> </body> </html>
VT 137 (10 S)
Hungarian Tomato Seeds Mano

Variety from Hungary
Sweet Pepper Sweet Banana Seeds

Sweet Pepper Sweet Banana...

Ár 1,95 € SKU: C 92
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Sweet Pepper Sweet Banana Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of about 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Sweet Pepper Sweet Banana is a bright yellow, long thin pepper that reaches up to 15cm long. They have thick walls and can have a bit of mild chilli type heat to them. The peppers mature from yellow to orange to red.</p> <p>They are great stuffed with goats cheese / garlic / rosemary and drizzled with a little olive oil. To ensure a good crop, it is best to sow with heat early and grow in a greenhouse / polytunnel.</p> <p>It can be grown outside but the crop needs quite a bit of warmth so crops may be smaller in size &amp; quantity and not as many will ripen fully. Sweet Pepper 'Sweet Banana' do well in containers, provided it is watered and has enough warmth and sun.</p> <p>They do sound fiddly but treat like a greenhouse tomato and you should be rewarded with lovely juicy peppers.</p> <table style="width: 100%;" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong>When to Sow </strong></p> </td> <td> <p>February to April (Best in March).</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><strong>How to Sow:</strong></p> </td> <td> <p>Sow in seed trays/modules in greenhouse and lightly cover with compost and gently water. They need heat to germinate so place in heated propagator at about 22°C (or an airing cupboard but remove seeds as soon as they sprout and give them warmth &amp; light.) They can be slow to germinate from 21 - 28 days. Pot on into 9cm pots when a set of true leaves have grown and keep at a constant temperature of 14°C. Pot on again into 2L pots when they have rooted well. Either plant out in June or into 4/5L pots or the soil in a greenhouse in May/June.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><strong>Care:</strong></p> </td> <td> <p>They can be left to grow as cordons with supports and just pinch out the top when they reach the greenhouse roof. But the best method is to pinch out the growing tip and produce a smaller bushier plant that will only need a little staking and produce earlier fruits which should ripen easier. To help stimulate pollination just brush the flowers lightly with a paintbrush, going from one flower to the next, transferring the pollen. Water with a nitrogen rich feed (tomato feed) once a week when fruiting has begun.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><strong>Harvest:</strong></p> </td> <td> <p>June to September. Can be harvested &amp; eaten early when green or left to ripen to red, but the earlier fruits are picked more will be encouraged to follow.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
C 92
Sweet Pepper Sweet Banana Seeds
Spinach Seeds Matador

Spinach Seeds Matador

Ár 1,65 € SKU: VE 26 (2g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Spinach Seeds Matador</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2g (160) seeds.</strong></span><strong><span class=""></span></strong></h2> <p>Spinach Matador is an excellent early all round variety with oval and smooth leaves. Slow bolting spinach with a good mildew resistance. Excellent taste and texture, and is very slow to bolt.</p> <p>Late sowings will last well into winter. &nbsp;This spinach has it all.</p> <p>Sow the spinach seeds from early spring or in the autumn outside in a prepared bed 1 cm deep. &nbsp;Rich, weel drained soil is recommended. &nbsp;Thin out to 5-10cm apart as the seedlings appear. Water well in dry spells. Harvest the young leaves as required, picking only a few from each plant.</p> <p>Easy to grow, annual leaf vegetable. Crops for a long period.</p> <p>Can be sown in the autumn for winter leaves.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 26 (2g)
Spinach Seeds Matador

Variety from Hungary
Hungarian Sugar beet seeds...

Hungarian Sugar beet seeds...

Ár 2,25 € SKU: VE 163 (1g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Hungarian Sugar beet seeds Horpácsi</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 500 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Due to the sufficiently sweet radish taste in the rainy landscapes of Hungary, it is grown not only for fodder but also for food. It is pickled like sauerkraut. It is frost tolerant and can be harvested in late autumn. Its root is flat, round, the apical part is purple in color, protruding slightly from the ground. Sugar beet seeds Horpácsi is not sensitive to frost, it still grows during the autumn, you can pick it up in late autumn.</p> <p>Sowing depth: 2-3 cm.<br>Optimal germination temperature: 10-15 ° C.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 163 (1g)
Hungarian Sugar beet seeds Horpácsi
Pálma mag Közönséges...

Pálma mag Közönséges...

Ár 1,95 € SKU: PS 15
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Pálma mag Közönséges elefántláb (Beaucarnea recurvata)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80000;"><strong>Ár egy csomag 2 magot.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">A<span>&nbsp;</span><b>közönséges elefántláb</b><span>&nbsp;</span><i>(Beaucarnea recurvata)</i><span>&nbsp;</span>az<span>&nbsp;</span>egyszikűek<span>&nbsp;</span><i>(Liliopsida)</i><span>&nbsp;</span>osztályának<span>&nbsp;</span>spárgavirágúak<span>&nbsp;</span><i>(Asparagales)</i><span>&nbsp;</span>rendjébe, ezen belül a<span>&nbsp;</span>spárgafélék<span>&nbsp;</span><i>(Asparagaceae)</i><span>&nbsp;</span>családjába<span>&nbsp;</span>tartozó<span>&nbsp;</span>faj.</p> <p>A közönséges elefántláb eredeti előfordulási területe<span>&nbsp;</span>Mexikóban<span>&nbsp;</span>található. A következő mexikói államokban van jelen:<span>&nbsp;</span>Oaxaca,<span>&nbsp;</span>Puebla,<span>&nbsp;</span>San Luis Potosí,<span>&nbsp;</span>Tamaulipas<span>&nbsp;</span>és<span>&nbsp;</span>Veracruz.</p> <p>Érdekes kinézete miatt sokfelé közkedvelt dísznövény.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span id="Megjelen.C3.A9se"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Megjelenése">Megjelenése</span></h2> <p>Ennek a kisebb faméretű - 4730&nbsp;centiméter magas - spárgafélének a<span>&nbsp;</span>törzse<span>&nbsp;</span>alul, a talajszinten megvastagodott, feljebb haladva pedig szétágazik, több törzset alkotva. A hosszú és vékony<span>&nbsp;</span>levelei, az ágak végein csomókban helyezkednek el és lelógnak. A fehéres-sárga<span>&nbsp;</span>virágai<span>&nbsp;</span>virágzatokba<span>&nbsp;</span>tömörülnek és a levelek fölött szárakon helyezkednek el.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PS 15 (2 S)
Pálma mag Közönséges elefántláb (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Variety from Hungary
Hungarian Chili Kalocsa Seeds

Hungarian Chili Kalocsa Seeds

Ár 1,55 € SKU: C 26 K
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Hungarian Chili from Kalocsa Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>An excellent and highly valued old Hungarian variety of hot pepper. Hot chili peppers with hanging fruit, short stems, medium green leaves. Shrub 35-40 cm tall, plant with closed leaves in the shape of an umbrella. The fruit is 2-3 cm in diameter, spherically flattened. It has a smooth surface and an oval cross-section.</p> <p>The fruits are dark red when ripe, with an average weight of 4-7 g. Dry matter content in mature state 22-24%, mature color content in fruit wall 160-200 ASTA.</p> <p>The capsaicin content in the fruit is 1000-1100 mg/kg (16000-17500 Scoville units).</p> <p>Recommendation: Good tolerance to viral diseases, rapid ripening.<br />The fruits are hard and great for long storage.</p> </body> </html>
C 26 K
Hungarian Chili Kalocsa Seeds
Plumeria (Frangipani) Seeds "Mango"

Plumeria (Frangipani) Seeds...

Ár 2,95 € SKU: F 8 M
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:13pt;"><strong>Plumeria (Frangipani) Seeds "Mango" Flowers</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:13pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 4 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <div> <p>Plumeria (Frangipani) also known as the Lei flower, is native to warm tropical areas of the Pacific Islands, Caribbean, South America and Mexico. They can grow to be large shrubs or even small trees in mild areas of the U.S. In tropical regions, Plumeria may reach a height of 30' to 40' and half as wide. Their widely spaced thick succulent branches are round or pointed, and have long leather, fleshy leaves in clusters near the branch tips. Leaves tend to fall in early winter since they are deciduous and sensitive to cold. </p> </div> <div> <p>In colder climates plumeria should be grown in containrs. They make beautiful potted plants for the patio or greenhouse.  However, in milder climates, plumeria can be grown outdoors in the ground, where they make a small beautiful landscape trees. When temperatures dip into the low 40's they may be stored in their containers or uprooted carefully trying to take as much root as possible and stored over winter in a heated basement or garage where temperatures are kept above freezing. As soon as temperatures rise outdoors they can be brought out and planted again. They will resume growth, leaf out and begin to grow as if nothing happened</p> </div> <div> <p>The real payoff comes during the early summer through the early fall months, when very fragrant clusters of showy, waxy flowers provide the makings for your own Hawaiian Lei. There is absolutely nothing like the sweet fragrance of Plumeria in flower, with fragrances of jasmine, citrus, spices, gardenia, and other indescribable scents. These flowers are treasured by the Polynesian Islanders for their durability, fragrances and colors of whites, yellows, pinks, reds, and multiple pastels. </p> </div> <div> <p>Flowering can last up to 3 months at a time producing new blooms everyday. Once picked, a bloom can last for several days without wilting if kept in water.</p> </div> <div>For container planting use a coarse, well draining potting soil, such as cactus mix or potting mix with perlite and sand. Start with a 6" to 10" container or you may consider using a large container on a plant dolly once the plant is large enough to be in a larger pot to help make the job easier moving indoors as winter approaches. Insert the cut end down into the potting mix about 2 inches. Firm the soil around the cutting and water thoroughly.</div> <div>Water Plumerias deeply, but infrequently, let soil dry out somewhat before watering again. Begin to reduce the frequency of watering in mid-October, as the cool season approaches. Stop watering after all the leaves have fallen and the plant has gone dormant. Resume watering in the spring as new growth begins.</div> <div>Plumerias should be fed with a high nitrogen fertilizer beginning in spring when growth begins. To encourage the most blooms a switch to a high phosphorous fertilizer in early May and fertilize every 2 to 3 weeks through the end of August. </div>
F 8 M
Plumeria (Frangipani) Seeds "Mango"

Best seller product
Ruffled fan Palm Seeds  (Licuala  grandis) 3.8 - 1

Nagy bokorpálma magok...

Ár 4,80 € SKU: PS 12
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Nagy bokorpálma magok (Licuala grandis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Ár csomag 3 magot.</strong></span></h2> <p>A<span> </span><b>nagy bokorpálma</b><span> </span><i>(Licuala grandis)</i><span> </span>az<span> </span>egyszikűek<span> </span><i>(Liliopsida)</i><span> </span>osztályának<span> </span>a<span> </span>pálmavirágúak<span> </span><i>(Arecales)</i><span> </span>rendjébe, ezen belül a<span> </span>pálmafélék<span> </span><i>(Arecaceae)</i><span> </span>családjába<span> </span>tartozó<span> </span>faj.</p> <p>A nagy bokorpálma kertekben és parkokban minden nedves<span> </span>trópusi<span> </span>területen megtalálható. Eredetileg a<span> </span>Pápua Új-Guineától<span> </span>délkeletre fekvő<span> </span>Vanuatu<span> </span>szigetről származik.</p> <h2><span id="Megjelen.C3.A9se"></span><span class="mw-headline" id="Megjelenése">Megjelenése</span></h2> <p>A pálma felálló törzsű, 2-3 méter magas. A törzs nagyon vékony, legalább felül idős levélnyelek maradványai borítják.<span> </span>Levele<span> </span>legyezőszerű, valamivel több mint fél- vagy jó háromnegyed kör alakú, körülbelül 1 méter átmérőjű, túlnyomórészt laposan szétterülő, a legyezősugarak csak az utolsó centimétereken különülnek el egymástól, és a csúcsukon kéthasábúak. A levélnyél legfeljebb 1 méter hosszú. Sárga, körülbelül 1 centiméteres<span> </span>virágai<span> </span>többszörösen elágazó<span> </span>virágzatokban<span> </span>fejlődnek, amelyek a levelek között erednek, és többnyire csak kissé emelkednek föléjük.<span> </span>Termése<span> </span>világító világospiros, körülbelül 1 centiméter átmérőjű. A terméságazatok csüngők.</p> <p><strong><span>Propagation:</span></strong><span> Propagated by seed. It might take as long as 12 months for seeds to sprout.</span></p> </body> </html>
PS 12
Ruffled fan Palm Seeds  (Licuala  grandis) 3.8 - 1
Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)

Bourbon Vanilla Seeds...

Ár 3,50 € SKU: MHS 104
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f80202; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 or 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Vanilla planifolia is a species of vanilla orchid. It is native to Mexico and Central America, and is one of the primary sources for vanilla flavouring, due to its high vanillin content. Common names are flat-leaved vanilla, Tahitian vanilla,[citation needed] and West Indian vanilla (also used for the Pompona vanilla, V. pompona). Often, it is simply referred to as "the vanilla". It was first scientifically named in 1808.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla planifolia is found in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and northeastern South America. It prefers hot, wet, tropical climates. </span></p> <p><span>It is cultivated and harvested primarily in Veracruz, Mexico and in Madagascar.</span></p> <p><span>Like all members of the genus Vanilla, V. planifolia is a vine. It uses its fleshy roots to support itself as it grows.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Flowers</span></strong></p> <p><span>Flowers are greenish-yellow, with a diameter of 5 cm (2 in). They last only a day, and must be pollinated manually, during the morning, if fruit is desired. The plants are self-fertile, and pollination simply requires a transfer of the pollen from the anther to the stigma. If pollination does not occur, the flower is dropped the next day. In the wild, there is less than 1% chance that the flowers will be pollinated, so in order to receive a steady flow of fruit, the flowers must be hand-pollinated when grown on farms.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Fruit</span></strong></p> <p><span>Fruit is produced only on mature plants, which are generally over 3 m (10 ft) long. The fruits are 15-23 cm (6-9 in) long pods (often incorrectly called beans). Outwardly they resemble small bananas. They mature after about five months, at which point they are harvested and cured. Curing ferments and dries the pods while minimizing the loss of essential oils. Vanilla extract is obtained from this portion of the plant.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla is a flavoring derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla, primarily from the Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla (V. planifolia). The word vanilla, derived from vainilla, the diminutive of the Spanish word vaina (vaina itself meaning sheath or pod), is translated simply as "little pod". Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican people cultivated the vine of the vanilla orchid, called tlilxochitl by the Aztecs. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s.</span></p> <p><span>Pollination is required to set the vanilla fruit from which the flavoring is derived. In 1837, Belgian botanist Charles François Antoine Morren discovered this fact and pioneered a method of artificially pollinating the plant.[3] The method proved financially unworkable and was not deployed commercially.[4] In 1841, Edmond Albius, a slave who lived on the French island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean, discovered at the age of 12 that the plant could be hand-pollinated. Hand-pollination allowed global cultivation of the plant.</span></p> <p><span>Three major species of vanilla currently are grown globally, all of which derive from a species originally found in Mesoamerica, including parts of modern-day Mexico.[6] They are V. planifolia (syn. V. fragrans), grown on Madagascar, Réunion, and other tropical areas along the Indian Ocean; V. tahitensis, grown in the South Pacific; and V. pompona, found in the West Indies, and Central and South America.[7] The majority of the world's vanilla is the V. planifolia species, more commonly known as Bourbon vanilla (after the former name of Réunion, Île Bourbon) or Madagascar vanilla, which is produced in Madagascar and neighboring islands in the southwestern Indian Ocean, and in Indonesia.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla is the second-most expensive spice after saffron.  Despite the expense, vanilla is highly valued for its flavor.  As a result, vanilla is widely used in both commercial and domestic baking, perfume manufacture, and aromatherapy.</span></p> <p><strong><span>History</span></strong></p> <p><span>According to popular belief, the Totonac people, who inhabit the east coast of Mexico in the present-day state of Veracruz, were the first to cultivate vanilla. According to Totonac mythology, the tropical orchid was born when Princess Xanat, forbidden by her father from marrying a mortal, fled to the forest with her lover. The lovers were captured and beheaded. Where their blood touched the ground, the vine of the tropical orchid grew.[4] In the 15th century, Aztecs invading from the central highlands of Mexico conquered the Totonacs, and soon developed a taste for the vanilla pods. They named the fruit tlilxochitl, or "black flower", after the matured fruit, which shrivels and turns black shortly after it is picked. Subjugated by the Aztecs, the Totonacs paid tribute by sending vanilla fruit to the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan.</span></p> <p><span>Until the mid-19th century, Mexico was the chief producer of vanilla. In 1819, French entrepreneurs shipped vanilla fruits to the islands of Réunion and Mauritius in hopes of producing vanilla there. After Edmond Albius discovered how to pollinate the flowers quickly by hand, the pods began to thrive. Soon, the tropical orchids were sent from Réunion to the Comoros Islands, Seychelles, and Madagascar, along with instructions for pollinating them. By 1898, Madagascar, Réunion, and the Comoros Islands produced 200 metric tons of vanilla beans, about 80% of world production. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, Indonesia is currently responsible for the vast majority of the world's Bourbon vanilla production and 58% of the world total vanilla fruit production.</span></p> <p><span>The market price of vanilla rose dramatically in the late 1970s after a tropical cyclone ravaged key croplands. Prices remained high through the early 1980s despite the introduction of Indonesian vanilla. In the mid-1980s, the cartel that had controlled vanilla prices and distribution since its creation in 1930 disbanded. Prices dropped 70% over the next few years, to nearly US$20 per kilogram; prices rose sharply again after tropical cyclone Hudah struck Madagascar in April 2000. The cyclone, political instability, and poor weather in the third year drove vanilla prices to an astonishing US$500/kg in 2004, bringing new countries into the vanilla industry. A good crop, coupled with decreased demand caused by the production of imitation vanilla, pushed the market price down to the $40/kg range in the middle of 2005. By 2010, prices were down to $20/kg. Cyclone Enawo caused in similar spike to $500/kg in 2017.</span></p> <p><span>Madagascar (especially the fertile Sava region) accounts for much of the global production of vanilla. Mexico, once the leading producer of natural vanilla with an annual yield of 500 tons of cured beans, produced only 10 tons in 2006. An estimated 95% of "vanilla" products are artificially flavored with vanillin derived from lignin instead of vanilla fruits.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Etymology</span></strong></p> <p><span>Vanilla was completely unknown in the Old World before Cortés. Spanish explorers arriving on the Gulf Coast of Mexico in the early 16th century gave vanilla its current name. Spanish and Portuguese sailors and explorers brought vanilla into Africa and Asia later that century. They called it vainilla, or "little pod". The word vanilla entered the English language in 1754, when the botanist Philip Miller wrote about the genus in his Gardener’s Dictionary. Vainilla is from the diminutive of vaina, from the Latin vagina (sheath) to describe the shape of the pods.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Vanilla orchid</span></strong></p> <p><span>The main species harvested for vanilla is V. planifolia. Although it is native to Mexico, it is now widely grown throughout the tropics. Indonesia and Madagascar are the world's largest producers. Additional sources include V. pompona and V. tahitiensis (grown in Niue and Tahiti), although the vanillin content of these species is much less than V. planifolia.</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla grows as a vine, climbing up an existing tree (also called a tutor), pole, or other support. It can be grown in a wood (on trees), in a plantation (on trees or poles), or in a "shader", in increasing orders of productivity. Its growth environment is referred to as its terroir, and includes not only the adjacent plants, but also the climate, geography, and local geology. Left alone, it will grow as high as possible on the support, with few flowers. Every year, growers fold the higher parts of the plant downward so the plant stays at heights accessible by a standing human. This also greatly stimulates flowering.</span></p> <p><span>The distinctively flavored compounds are found in the fruit, which results from the pollination of the flower. These seed pods are roughly a third of an inch by six inches, and brownish red to black when ripe. Inside of these pods is an oily liquid full of tiny seeds.[22] One flower produces one fruit. V. planifolia flowers are hermaphroditic: they carry both male (anther) and female (stigma) organs. However, self-pollination is blocked by a membrane which separates those organs. The flowers can be naturally pollinated by bees of genus Melipona (abeja de monte or mountain bee), by bee genus Eulaema, or by hummingbirds. The Melipona bee provided Mexico with a 300-year-long advantage on vanilla production from the time it was first discovered by Europeans. The first vanilla orchid to flower in Europe was in the London collection of the Honourable Charles Greville in 1806. Cuttings from that plant went to Netherlands and Paris, from which the French first transplanted the vines to their overseas colonies. The vines grew, but would not fruit outside Mexico. Growers tried to bring this bee into other growing locales, to no avail. The only way to produce fruits without the bees is artificial pollination. Today, even in Mexico, hand pollination is used extensively.</span></p> <p><span>In 1836, botanist Charles François Antoine Morren was drinking coffee on a patio in Papantla (in Veracruz, Mexico) and noticed black bees flying around the vanilla flowers next to his table. He watched their actions closely as they would land and work their way under a flap inside the flower, transferring pollen in the process. Within hours, the flowers closed and several days later, Morren noticed vanilla pods beginning to form. Morren immediately began experimenting with hand pollination. A few years later in 1841, a simple and efficient artificial hand-pollination method was developed by a 12-year-old slave named Edmond Albius on Réunion, a method still used today. Using a beveled sliver of bamboo, an agricultural worker lifts the membrane separating the anther and the stigma, then, using the thumb, transfers the pollinia from the anther to the stigma. The flower, self-pollinated, will then produce a fruit. The vanilla flower lasts about one day, sometimes less, so growers have to inspect their plantations every day for open flowers, a labor-intensive task.</span></p> <p><span>The fruit, a seed capsule, if left on the plant, ripens and opens at the end; as it dries, the phenolic compounds crystallize, giving the fruits a diamond-dusted appearance, which the French call givre (hoarfrost). It then releases the distinctive vanilla smell. The fruit contains tiny, black seeds. In dishes prepared with whole natural vanilla, these seeds are recognizable as black specks. Both the pod and the seeds are used in cooking.</span></p> <p><span>Like other orchids' seeds, vanilla seeds will not germinate without the presence of certain mycorrhizal fungi. Instead, growers reproduce the plant by cutting: they remove sections of the vine with six or more leaf nodes, a root opposite each leaf. The two lower leaves are removed, and this area is buried in loose soil at the base of a support. The remaining upper roots cling to the support, and often grow down into the soil. Growth is rapid under good conditions.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Cultivars</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span>Bourbon vanilla</span></strong><span> or Bourbon-Madagascar vanilla, produced from V. planifolia plants introduced from the Americas, is from Indian Ocean islands such as Madagascar, the Comoros, and Réunion, formerly the Île Bourbon. It is also used to describe the distinctive vanilla flavor derived from V. planifolia grown successfully in tropical countries such as India.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Mexican vanilla</span></strong><span>, made from the native V. planifolia,[26] is produced in much less quantity and marketed as the vanilla from the land of its origin. Vanilla sold in tourist markets around Mexico is sometimes not actual vanilla extract, but is mixed with an extract of the tonka bean, which contains the toxin coumarin. Tonka bean extract smells and tastes like vanilla, but coumarin has been shown to cause liver damage in lab animals and has been banned in food in the US by the Food and Drug Administration since 1954.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Tahitian vanilla</span></strong><span> is from French Polynesia, made with V. tahitiensis. Genetic analysis shows this species is possibly a cultivar from a hybrid of V. planifolia and V. odorata. The species was introduced by French Admiral François Alphonse Hamelin to French Polynesia from the Philippines, where it was introduced from Guatemala by the Manila Galleon trade.</span></p> <p><strong><span>West Indian vanilla</span></strong><span> is made from V. pompona grown in the Caribbean and Central and South America.</span></p> <p><span>The term French vanilla is often used to designate particular preparations with a strong vanilla aroma, containing vanilla grains and sometimes also containing eggs (especially egg yolks). The appellation originates from the French style of making vanilla ice cream with a custard base, using vanilla pods, cream, and egg yolks. Inclusion of vanilla varietals from any of the former French dependencies or overseas France may be a part of the flavoring. Alternatively, French vanilla is taken to refer to a vanilla-custard flavor.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Chemistry</span></strong></p> <p><span>Vanilla essence occurs in two forms. Real seedpod extract is a complex mixture of several hundred different compounds, including vanillin, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, furfural, hexanoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, eugenol, methyl cinnamate, and isobutyric acid.[citation needed] Synthetic essence consists of a solution of synthetic vanillin in ethanol. The chemical compound vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) is a major contributor to the characteristic flavor and aroma of real vanilla and is the main flavor component of cured vanilla beans.[30] Vanillin was first isolated from vanilla pods by Gobley in 1858. By 1874, it had been obtained from glycosides of pine tree sap, temporarily causing a depression in the natural vanilla industry. Vanillin can be easily synthesized from various raw materials, but the majority of food-grade (&gt; 99% pure) vanillin is made from guaiacol.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Pollination</span></strong></p> <p><span>Flowering normally occurs every spring, and without pollination, the blossom wilts and falls, and no vanilla bean can grow. Each flower must be hand-pollinated within 12 hours of opening. In the wild, very few natural pollinators exist, with most pollination thought to be carried out by the shiny green Euglossa viridissima, some Eulaema spp. and other species of the euglossine or orchid bees, Euglossini, though direct evidence is lacking. Closely related Vanilla species are known to be pollinated by the euglossine bees.[40] The previously suggested pollination by stingless bees of the genus Melipona is thought to be improbable, as they are too small to be effective and have never been observed carrying Vanilla pollen or pollinating other orchids, though they do visit the flowers.[41] These pollinators do not exist outside the orchid's home range, and even within that range, vanilla orchids have only a 1% chance of successful pollination. As a result, all vanilla grown today is pollinated by hand. A small splinter of wood or a grass stem is used to lift the rostellum or move the flap upward, so the overhanging anther can be pressed against the stigma and self-pollinate the vine. Generally, one flower per raceme opens per day, so the raceme may be in flower for over 20 days. A healthy vine should produce about 50 to 100 beans per year, but growers are careful to pollinate only five or six flowers from the 20 on each raceme. The first flowers that open per vine should be pollinated, so the beans are similar in age. These agronomic practices facilitate harvest and increases bean quality. The fruits require five to six weeks to develop, but around six months to mature. Over-pollination results in diseases and inferior bean quality.[35] A vine remains productive between 12 and 14 years.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Harvest</span></strong></p> <p><span>Harvesting vanilla fruits is as labor-intensive as pollinating the blossoms. Immature, dark green pods are not harvested. Pale yellow discoloration that commences at the distal end of the fruits is not a good indication of the maturity of pods. Each fruit ripens at its own time, requiring a daily harvest. "Current methods for determining the maturity of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) beans are unreliable. Yellowing at the blossom end, the current index, occurs before beans accumulate maximum glucovanillin concentrations. Beans left on the vine until they turn brown have higher glucovanillin concentrations but may split and have low quality. Judging bean maturity is difficult as they reach full size soon after pollination. Glucovanillin accumulates from 20 weeks, maximum about 40 weeks after pollination. Mature green beans have 20% dry matter but less than 2% glucovanillin."[46] The accumulation of dry matter and glucovanillin are highly correlated.To ensure the finest flavor from every fruit, each individual pod must be picked by hand just as it begins to split on the end. Overmatured fruits are likely to split, causing a reduction in market value. Its commercial value is fixed based on the length and appearance of the pod.</span></p> <p><span>If the fruit is more than 15 cm (5.9 in) in length, it is categorized as first-quality. The largest fruits greater than 16 cm and up to as much as 21 cm are usually reserved for the gourmet vanilla market, for sale to top chefs and restaurants. If the fruits are between 10 and 15 cm long, pods are under the second-quality category, and fruits less than 10 cm in length are under the third-quality category. Each fruit contains thousands of tiny black vanilla seeds. Vanilla fruit yield depends on the care and management given to the hanging and fruiting vines. Any practice directed to stimulate aerial root production has a direct effect on vine productivity. A five-year-old vine can produce between 1.5 and 3 kg (3.3 and 6.6 lb) pods, and this production can increase up to 6 kg (13 lb) after a few years. The harvested green fruit can be commercialized as such or cured to get a better market price.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Culinary uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>The four main commercial preparations of natural vanilla are:</span></p> <p><span>Whole pod</span></p> <p><span>Powder (ground pods, kept pure or blended with sugar, starch, or other ingredients)</span></p> <p><span>Extract (in alcoholic or occasionally glycerol solution; both pure and imitation forms of vanilla contain at least 35% alcohol)</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla sugar, a packaged mix of sugar and vanilla extract</span></p> <p><span>Vanilla flavoring in food may be achieved by adding vanilla extract or by cooking vanilla pods in the liquid preparation. A stronger aroma may be attained if the pods are split in two, exposing more of a pod's surface area to the liquid. In this case, the pods' seeds are mixed into the preparation. Natural vanilla gives a brown or yellow color to preparations, depending on the concentration. Good-quality vanilla has a strong, aromatic flavor, but food with small amounts of low-quality vanilla or artificial vanilla-like flavorings are far more common, since true vanilla is much more expensive.</span></p> <p><span>Regarded as the world's most popular aroma and flavor, vanilla is a widely used aroma and flavor compound for foods, beverages and cosmetics, as indicated by its popularity as an ice cream flavor.[64] Although vanilla is a prized flavoring agent on its own, it is also used to enhance the flavor of other substances, to which its own flavor is often complementary, such as chocolate, custard, caramel, coffee, and others. Vanilla is a common ingredient in Western sweet baked goods, such as cookies and cakes.</span></p> <p><span>The food industry uses methyl and ethyl vanillin as less-expensive substitutes for real vanilla. Ethyl vanillin is more expensive, but has a stronger note. Cook's Illustrated ran several taste tests pitting vanilla against vanillin in baked goods and other applications, and to the consternation of the magazine editors, tasters could not differentiate the flavor of vanillin from vanilla; however, for the case of vanilla ice cream, natural vanilla won out.[66] A more recent and thorough test by the same group produced a more interesting variety of results; namely, high-quality artificial vanilla flavoring is best for cookies, while high-quality real vanilla is slightly better for cakes and significantly better for unheated or lightly heated foods. The liquid extracted from vanilla pods was once believed to have medical properties, helping with various stomach ailments.</span></p> </body> </html>
MHS 104
Bourbon Vanilla Seeds (Vanilla planifolia)

Variety from Peru
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6

Purple Corn Seeds - Maíz...

Ár 2,25 € SKU: VE 72
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Corn - Maíz Morado "Kculli" - Purple Maize Seeds</strong> <strong>(Zea mays amylaceaa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0101;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 4,5g (10), 9g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Purple corn, a variety of Zea mays, is an Andean crop from low valleys locally called maiz Morado. Purple corn can be found mostly in Peru, where it is cultivated on the coast, as well as in lands almost ten thousand feet high. There are different varieties of purple corn, and all of them originated from an ancestral line called “Kculli”, still cultivated in Peru. The Kculli line is very old, and ancient objects in the shape of these particular ears of corn have been found in archeological sites at least 2,500 years old in places on the central coast, as well as among the ceramics of the “Mochica” culture.</p> <p>The kernels of purple corn are soaked in hot water by people of the Andes to yield a deep purple color for foods and beverages, a practice now recognized for its industrial uses as a colorant. Common in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru, purple corn is used in chicha Morada, a drink made by boiling ground purple corn kernels with pineapple, cinnamon, clove, and sugar, and in mazamorra, a type of pudding. One of the most popular purple corn food uses is the "Api", a smoothie served hot and sometimes called "Inca's dessert".</p> <p>Purple corn contains substantial amounts of phenolics and anthocyanins, among other phytochemicals. Its main colorant is cianidin-3-b-glucosa. People of the Andes make a refreshing drink from purple corn called "chicha Morada" which is now recognized as a nutritive powerhouse due to its phenolic content. Phenolics are known to have many bioactive and functional properties. Research shows that crops with the highest total phenolic and anthocyanin content also have the highest antioxidant activity.</p> <p>Anthocyaninins are a type of complex flavonoid that produce blue, purple or red colors.&nbsp;</p> <p>Purple Corn has a higher antioxidant capacity and antiradical kinetics than blueberries and higher or similar anthocyanin and phenolic contents.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 72 (4.5g)
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6
Prayer Plant, Ice Cream Flower Seeds (Calathea warscewiczii) 2.85 - 6

Prayer Plant, Ice Cream...

Ár 2,85 € SKU: F 73
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Prayer Plant, Ice Cream Flower Seeds (Calathea warscewiczii)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Calathea warscewiczii  is a tropical and tender evergreen perennial herbaceous plant native to Costa Rica and Nicaragua and produces lanceoate leaves that have a dark green background and an attractive fishtail pattern on the upperside of the leaves. The wonderful coloured leaves of Calathea warscewiczii are completed by a  velvet-fuzzy texture, an attribute of this particular species.  Calathea warscewiczii can grow up to 0.5 to 1 metres (20-40 inch) high, 0.5 to 1 metres (20-40 inch) wide. The leaves have a contrasting maroon-purple coloured on the reverse of each leaf .</p> <p>Besides its attractive leaves, Calathea warscewiczii also produces showy cone-like inflorescences. The bracts that cover the cone are creamy white in colour when they first emerge and they gradually turn to yellow and take on a pinkish hue with time. They are spirally arranged around the cone and the rims of these bracts fold over the edge, which make the entire cone looks somewhat like a rose flower when viewed from the top!</p> <p><strong>Care</strong>: Calathea warscewiczii needs to be grown in an area with bright, filtered sunshine. Like most other sensitive calatheas, direct sunlight can burn the leaves of this plant. This plant likes to be grown in an area with high humidity and protected from winds.</p> <p><strong>Light:</strong> Place the Calathea warscewiczii plants in an area of the home or garden that remains bright during the day, but receives very little direct sunlight. Direct sunlight can bleach the color out of the leaves, and can even curl or burn the leaves. Calathea warscewiczii should be kept in partial shade especially during the hotter months of the year. During the cooler winter months, the Calathea warscewiczii should be moved to a brighter area to provides a fair amount of sunlight, but still should not be exposed in direct sunlight. Direct sunlight will not only dull the vibrant colors of the plant, it can scorch the leaves and ultimately kill the plant.</p> <p><strong>Temperature:</strong> The Calathea warscewiczii prefers average to warm air temperatures: 18-27°C (65-80°F) year-round. During the cold months, the Calathea warscewiczii should be kept at temperatures of 16°C (60°F) and above. Sudden drops in the air temperature can damage the foliage.</p> <p><strong>Water:</strong> Water Calathea warscewiczii depending on the season. During the growing season and during warm or hot temperatures, keep the soil moist but not soaking. In the winter and during cold temperatures, allow the soil to become slightly dry before watering again. Place Calathea warscewiczii’s pot in a pebble tray filled with water. This will help keep the humidity high near the plant.  Keep well watered in summer; Calathea warscewiczii love high humidity mist. The soil should be kept moist at all times but should not be water-logged.</p> <p>Water Calathea warscewiczii with distilled or bottled water. Hard water and contaminants sometimes found in tap water can damage the plant’s roots. Soft, tepid water is best for watering the Calathea warscewiczii.</p> <p>Leaves that become curled, spotted, or appear to have yellowed are signs that the Calathea warscewiczii is not receiving enough water.</p> <p><strong>Humidity:</strong><strong> </strong>The Calathea warscewiczii is a humid-loving plant and should be misted regularly. The soil can be surrounded with damp peat to help provide and retain humidity levels. For rooms that have low levels of humidity, a humidifier can help maintain humidity levels that this plant needs. The ideal temperature for a Calathea warscewiczii is between 18-27°C (65-80°F) with a humidity level above 70 percent. Try to maintain at least 50% relative humidity year-round.</p> <p>Browning of the foliage tips or loss of leaves can be a sign that the plant is not getting the humidity that it requires.</p> <p><strong>Wintering:</strong> Keep warm minimum of 16°C (60°F). During the winter months (non-growing season), reduce the amount of water provided as too much water in the cooler weather may lead to rotting stems.</p> <p>Display Calathea warscewiczii in light shade during summer. Brighter in winter but keep out of direct sun, this will dull the colour of the leaves, and could be fatal!</p> <p><strong>Soil:</strong> Peat-rich potting mix. Loam with high organic matter.</p> <p>It is best to grow Calathea warscewiczii in well-drained mix that is rich in organic matter. The fibrous roots need to be in contact with moist soil at all times and it should not be allowed to dry out completely. Mulch generously to help keep the roots moist and cool. Waterlogged conditions should also be avoided as roots can rot away.<br />When the plant is grown in an area that is too hot, dry or windy, its leaves will curl up into a roll and leaf edges will likely to turn brown as well. Unhappy plants tend to exhibit stunted growth. It is a challenging plant to grow in highrise apartments due to the dry and often windy conditions.</p> <p><strong>Fertilizer:</strong> Feed Calathea warscewiczii with a liquid fertilizer diluted by half every 2 weeks spring through fall or feed with a very weak solution when watering the plant. Use only water-soluble fertilizers and follow product instructions regarding the amount of fertilizer to use, as this will vary depending on the size of the plant. Do not use fertilizer at full strength or fertilize the plant too often. Overfertilizing can cause leaf spots.</p> <p><strong>Pruning tip:</strong> Calathea warscewiczii will benefit from occasional pruning, which helps to give it a nice shape and promote new growth. Fall is the best time to cut it back. Use sharp pruners to cut away some of the older leaves.</p> <p><strong>Re-potting:</strong><strong> </strong>The Calathea warscewiczii should be re-potted every two years, preferably in the spring. A peat-based potting mix will help the plant retain moisture and humidity. Propagation can be done when the plant is being repotted.</p> <p>Do not repot too often and use a peat based compost.</p> <p><strong>Propagation:</strong> By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets).</p> <p>In spring, take 10 cm (4-inch) stem cuttings with 3-4 leaves attached. Root them in moist potting mix. When the plant gets too big, it can easily divide it in half by pulling apart its shallow roots. Propagated plants should be kept warm until they have been established.</p> <p><strong>Uses:</strong> Common as houseplants the Calathea warscewiczii are a stunning plants. With bold leaf markings as well as the bonus of the purple underside they are a great choice for a shady room. In warm climate condition Calathea warscewiczii is a beautiful plant for shady areas in a tropical themed garden.</p> <p><strong>Problems:</strong> Watch for spider mites. Dry indoor air in the winter months encourages these pests to invade house plants, another reason to keep the humidity up. A webbing will be noticed between stems and on the undersides of leaves.</p> <p>SUMMARY:</p> <p>Hardiness Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)<br />Climate Zones: humid subtropical to humid tropical<br />Sun Exposure: Partial to Full Shade<br />Tropicals and Tender Perennials<br />Size: 0.5 to 1 metres  (20-40 inch) high, 0.5 to 1 metres  (20-40 inch) wide<br />Bloom Color: Pale Pink<br />Bloom Time: Blooms repeatedly<br />Foliage: Grown for foliage, Evergreen, Mid green and light green, Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured<br />Flower colour: White<br />Propagation Methods: By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs<br />Maintenance: Low</p>
F 73
Prayer Plant, Ice Cream Flower Seeds (Calathea warscewiczii) 2.85 - 6