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Er zijn 43 producten.

Item 13-24 van 43 in totaal item(s)
Carrot Seeds Autumn King

Giant carrot seeds Autumn King

Prijs € 2,25 SKU: VE 27 AK
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant carrot seeds Autumn King</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 130 (0,2 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A splendid reliable maincrop mid-late crisp carrot, producing large, long conical roots with an even internal colour. Its excellent flavour and storage characteristics make this one of the most popular and widely grown maincrop varieties attaining huge sizes if left to fully mature.  Grows particularly well in an open position on light, rich soil that has not been recently manured.  68 days from germination.</p> <p>Dig or till the carrot bed deeply when the soil is on the dry side to avoid making lumps.</p> <p>Work the soil to a fine texture 15-25cm (6-10 in.) deep to allow the carrot roots to grow long and shapely.</p> <p>Avoid freshly-manured soil, which may produce hairy, rough roots and will cause forks and splits;</p> <p>Sow seed thinly in rows, 1cm (1/2 in.) deep, 30-40cm (12-16 in.) between the rows as soon as the danger of hard frost has passed. Try to get about 4 seeds per 2cm (1 in.).</p> <p>Thin to 16-20 carrots per 30 cm (1ft.) for fresh eating and 6-10 carrots per 30 cm (1ft.) for mature crops, depending on the root size you want, and keep weeded and watered. Dispose of thinned seedlings to avoid attracting Carrot Fly.</p> <p>As they grow, push soil up over any exposed roots to prevent a green shoulder.</p>
VE 27 AK (130 S)
Carrot Seeds Autumn King
Carrot Seeds Atomic Red

Carrot Seeds Atomic Red

Prijs € 1,50 SKU: VE 20 R
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Carrot Seeds Atomic Red</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 25 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Atomic Red carrot lives up to its name — its 11” long tapered roots are a beautiful scarlet color that gets brighter when cooked. This variety gets its hue from healthful Lypocene, a precursor to beta carotene credited for helping prevent several types of cancer. Grow carrots in cool weather. Draw out the Atomic Red’s remarkable color and flavor by steaming, roasting or baking these crispy roots. They’re very tasty in soups or stews.</p> <h3><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></h3> <h3><strong>Site &amp; Soil</strong></h3> <p>Get the soil conditions correct and carrots are one of the easiest vegetables to grow in the cooler climates. Incorrect soil conditions lead to mis-shapen carrots - these may well cause a chuckle when dug up, but they are not so well appreciated at cooking time! Carrots prefer a light soil which has been improved with lots of well-rotted organic material fully dug into the soil. Carrots grown on heavy soil, or where organic material is not well-rotted, will become misshapen and grow 'forked. Stones in the soil will have the same bad effect. Prepare the bed two weeks or so before planting, forking in a handful of bonemeal for each square meter (yard). Ensure that the soil is dug to a spade's depth and is of a crumbly texture.</p> <h3><strong>When to Sow</strong></h3> <p>Sow seeds from early spring to autumn</p> <h3><strong>How to Sow</strong></h3> <div>Using a trowel, dig out narrow drills 2cm (3/4inch) deep and 12cm (8inches) apart. Carrot seed is fine - the easiest way to sow is to empty some seed from the packet into the palm of your left hand and and take small pinches of seed with your right hand fingers, dropping a couple of seeds every 2.5cm (1 inch) along the narrow drills. Sow the seed thinly to avoid too much thinning out later. Cover the seeds with fine soil very gently firming it down. Water with a fine spray if the conditions are dry. The seedlings should start to appear 15 to 20 days later.</div>
VE 20 R (25 S)
Carrot Seeds Atomic Red
Carrot seeds, long blunt, xylem free (heart) 2.35 - 1

Carrot seeds, long blunt,...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: MHS 159
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Carrot seeds, long blunt, xylem free (heart)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>The price is for a pack of 800-1200 Seeds (1g).</strong></span></h2> <p>Late variety. Orange-red root, 22-24 cm long. Without Xylem ("woody heart") which is actually, and makes it great for preparing all kinds of dishes because it is not <span>woody</span>. Great taste, very sweet variety that is suitable for sowing both outdoors and greenhouses ...</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 159 (1g)
Carrot seeds, long blunt, xylem free (heart) 2.35 - 1
Herb Dill Bouquet Seeds 1.6 - 4

Dill seeds (Anethum...

Prijs € 1,60 SKU: MHS 121
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 900 (2g), 4500 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Dill</b><span> </span>(<i>Anethum graveolens</i>) is an<span> </span>annual<span> </span>herb<span> </span>in the celery family<span> </span>Apiaceae. It is the only species in the genus<span> </span><i>Anethum</i>. Dill is grown widely in<span> </span>Eurasia<span> </span>where its leaves and seeds are used as a herb or spice for flavouring food.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Growth">Growth</span></h2> <p>Dill grows up to 40–60 cm (16–24 in), with slender hollow stems and alternate, finely divided, softly delicate<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>10–20 cm (4–8 in) long. The ultimate leaf divisions are 1–2 mm (0.04–0.08 in) broad, slightly broader than the similar leaves of<span> </span>fennel, which are threadlike, less than 1 mm (0.04 in) broad, but harder in texture. The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are white to yellow, in small<span> </span>umbels<span> </span>2–9 cm (0.8–3.5 in) diameter. The<span> </span>seeds<span> </span>are 4–5 mm (0.16–0.20 in) long and 1 mm (0.04 in) thick, and straight to slightly curved with a longitudinally ridged surface.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <p>The word<span> </span><i>dill</i><span> </span>and its close relatives are found in most of the Germanic languages; its ultimate origin is unknown.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>The generic name<span> </span><i>Anethum</i><span> </span>is the<span> </span>Latin<span> </span>form of<span> </span>Greek<span> </span>ἄνῑσον / ἄνησον / ἄνηθον / ἄνητον, which meant both 'dill' and 'anise'. The form<span> </span><i>anīsum</i><span> </span>came to be used for anise, and<span> </span><i>anēthum</i><span> </span>for dill. The Latin word is the origin of dill's names in the<span> </span>Western Romance languages<span> </span>(<i>anet</i>,<span> </span><i>aneldo</i>, etc.), and also of the obsolete English<span> </span><i>anet</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Most<span> </span>Slavic language<span> </span>names come from<span> </span>Proto-Slavic<span> </span><i>*koprъ</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>which developed from the<span> </span>PIE<span> </span>root *<i>ku̯ə<sub>1</sub>po-</i><span> </span>'aroma, odor'.<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>Dill has been found in the tomb of Egyptian Pharaoh<span> </span>Amenhotep II, dating to around 1400 BC.<sup id="cite_ref-pickersgill_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>It was also later found in the Greek city of<span> </span>Samos, around the 7th century BC, and mentioned in the writings of<span> </span>Theophrastus<span> </span>(371–287 BC).<sup id="cite_ref-pickersgill_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_use">Culinary use</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Dill weed, fresh</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>180 kJ (43 kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>7 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.1 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>1.1 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>3.5 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A</th> <td>7717 (154%) IU</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine (B<span>1</span>)</th> <td> <div>9%</div> 0.1 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin (B<span>2</span>)</th> <td> <div>25%</div> 0.3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin (B<span>3</span>)</th> <td> <div>11%</div> 1.6 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid (B<span>5</span>)</th> <td> <div>8%</div> 0.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>15%</div> 0.2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate (B<span>9</span>)</th> <td> <div>38%</div> 150 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>12</span></th> <td> <div>0%</div> 0 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>102%</div> 85 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>21%</div> 208 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>51%</div> 6.6 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>15%</div> 55 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>62%</div> 1.3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>9%</div> 66 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>16%</div> 738 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>4%</div> 61 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>9%</div> 0.9 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Copper<span> </span>667</th> <td>0.14 mg (7%)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span> </span>micrograms • mg =<span> </span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span> </span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span> </span>US recommendations<span> </span>for adults.<br /><span class="nowrap">Source:<span> </span>USDA Nutrient Database</span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/DillEssOil.png/170px-DillEssOil.png" decoding="async" width="170" height="254" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/DillEssOil.png/255px-DillEssOil.png 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/DillEssOil.png/340px-DillEssOil.png 2x" data-file-width="857" data-file-height="1280" title="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Dill (<i>Anethum graveolens</i>) essential oil in clear glass vial</div> </div> </div> <p>Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called "<b>dill weed</b>" or "<b>dillweed</b>" to distinguish it from dill seed) are widely used as<span> </span>herbs<span> </span>in<span> </span>Europe<span> </span>and central Asia.</p> <p>Like<span> </span>caraway, the fernlike leaves of dill are aromatic and are used to flavor many<span> </span>foods<span> </span>such as<span> </span>gravlax<span> </span>(cured<span> </span>salmon) and other<span> </span>fish<span> </span>dishes,<span> </span>borscht, and other<span> </span>soups, as well as<span> </span>pickles<span> </span>(where the dill flower is sometimes used). Dill is best when used fresh, as it loses its flavor rapidly if dried, however,<span> </span>freeze-dried<span> </span>dill leaves retain their flavor relatively well for a few months.</p> <p>Dill oil<span> </span>is extracted from the leaves, stems, and seeds of the plant. The oil from the seeds is distilled and used in the manufacturing of soaps.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Dill is the<span> </span>eponymous<span> </span>ingredient in dill<span> </span>pickles.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference"></sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="European_cuisine">European cuisine</span></h3> <p>In<span> </span>central<span> </span>and<span> </span>eastern Europe,<span> </span>Scandinavia,<span> </span>Baltic states,<span> </span>Ukraine, and<span> </span>Russia, dill is a staple<span> </span>culinary herb<span> </span>along with<span> </span>chives<span> </span>and<span> </span>parsley. Fresh, finely cut dill leaves are used as a topping in soups, especially the hot red<span> </span>borsht<span> </span>and the cold borsht mixed with curds, kefir, yogurt, or sour cream, which is served during hot summer weather and is called<span> </span>okroshka. It also is popular in summer to drink fermented milk (curds, kefir, yogurt, or buttermilk) mixed with dill (and sometimes other herbs).</p> <p>In the same way, dill is used as a topping for boiled potatoes covered with fresh butter – especially in summer when there are so-called "new", or young, potatoes. The dill leaves may be mixed with butter, making a dill butter, to serve the same purpose. Dill leaves mixed with<span> </span>tvorog, form one of the traditional cheese spreads used for sandwiches. Fresh dill leaves are used throughout the year as an ingredient in salads,<span> </span><i>e.g.</i>, one made of lettuce, fresh cucumbers, and tomatoes, as<span> </span>basil<span> </span>leaves are used in Italy and Greece.</p> <p>Russian cuisine<span> </span>is noted for liberal use of dill, where it is known as<span> </span><i lang="ru" title="Russian language text">укроп</i>. Its supposed<span> </span>antiflatulent<span> </span>activity caused some Russian cosmonauts to recommend its use in<span> </span>human spaceflight<span> </span>due to the confined quarters and closed air supply.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <p>In<span> </span>Polish cuisine, fresh dill leaves mixed with sour cream are the basis for dressings. It is especially popular to use this kind of sauce with freshly cut cucumbers, which practically are wholly immersed in the sauce, making a salad called<span> </span>mizeria. Dill sauce is used hot for baked freshwater fish and for chicken or turkey breast, or used hot or cold for hard-boiled eggs. A dill-based soup, (zupa koperkowa), served with potatoes and hard-boiled eggs, is popular in Poland. Whole stems including roots and flower buds are used traditionally to prepare Polish-style pickled cucumbers (ogórki kiszone), especially the so-called low-salt cucumbers ("ogórki małosolne"). Whole stems of dill (often including the roots) also are cooked with potatoes, especially the potatoes of autumn and winter, so they resemble the flavor of the newer potatoes found in summer. Some kinds of fish, especially trout and salmon, traditionally are baked with the stems and leaves of dill.</p> <p>In the<span> </span>Czech Republic, white dill sauce made of cream (or milk), butter, flour, vinegar, and dill is called<span> </span><i>koprová omáčka</i><span> </span>(also<span> </span><i>koprovka</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>kopračka</i>) and is served either with boiled eggs and potatoes, or with dumplings and boiled beef. Another Czech dish with dill is a soup called,<span> </span><i>kulajda</i>, that contains mushrooms (traditionally wild ones).</p> <p>In Germany, dill is popular as a seasoning for fish and many other dishes, chopped as a garnish on potatoes, and as a flavoring in pickles.</p> <p>In the UK, dill may be used in<span> </span>fish pie.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Bulgaria<span> </span>dill is widely used in traditional vegetable salads, and most notably the yogurt-based cold soup<span> </span>Tarator. It is also used in the preparation of sour pickles, cabbage, and other dishes.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Romania<span> </span>dill (<i>mărar</i>) is widely used as an ingredient for soups such as<span> </span><i>borş</i><span> </span>(pronounced "borsh"), pickles, and other dishes, especially those based on peas, beans, and cabbage. It is popular for dishes based on potatoes and mushrooms and may be found in many summer salads (especially cucumber salad, cabbage salad and lettuce salad). During springtime, it is used in omelets with spring onions. It often complements sauces based on sour cream or yogurt and is mixed with salted cheese and used as a filling. Another popular dish with dill as a main ingredient is dill sauce, which is served with eggs and fried sausages.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Hungary, dill is very widely used. It is popular as a sauce or filling, and mixed with a type of cottage cheese. Dill is also used for<span> </span>pickling<span> </span>and in salads. The Hungarian name for dill is<span> </span><i>kapor</i>.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Serbia, dill is known as<span> </span><i>mirodjija</i><span> </span>and is used as an addition to soups, potato and cucumber salads, and French fries. It features in the Serbian proverb, "бити мирођија у свакој чорби" /biti mirodjija u svakoj čorbi/ (to be a dill in every soup), which corresponds to the English proverb "to have a finger in every pie".</p> <p>In<span> </span>Greece, dill is known as 'άνηθος' (anithos). In antiquity it was used as an ingredient in wines that were called "anithites oinos" (wine with anithos-dill). In modern days, dill is used in salads, soups, sauces, and fish and vegetable dishes.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Santa Maria,<span> </span>Azores, dill (<i>endro</i>) is the most important ingredient of the traditional Holy Ghost soup (<i>sopa do Espírito Santo</i>). Dill is found ubiquitously in Santa Maria, yet curiously, is rare in the other Azorean Islands.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Sweden, dill is a common spice or herb. The top of fully grown dill is called<span> </span><i>krondill</i><span> </span>(English: Crown dill); this is used when cooking<span> </span>crayfish. The<span> </span><i>krondill</i><span> </span>is put into the water after the crayfish is boiled, but still in hot and salt water. Then the entire dish is refrigerated for at least 24 hours before being served (with toasted bread and butter).<span> </span><i>Krondill</i><span> </span>also is used for<span> </span>cucumber<span> </span>pickles. Small cucumbers, sliced or not, are put into a solution of hot water, mild acetic<span> </span>white vinegar<span> </span>(made from vodka, not wine), sugar, and<span> </span><i>krondill</i>. After a month or two of fermentation, the cucumber pickles are ready to eat, for instance, with pork, brown sauce, and potatoes, as a "sweetener". The thinner part of dill and young plants may be used with boiled fresh potatoes (especially the first potatoes of the year, "new potatoes", which usually are small and have a very thin skin). In salads it is used together with, or instead, of other green herbs, such as<span> </span>parsley,<span> </span>chives, and<span> </span>basil. It often is paired up with chives when used in food. Dill often is used to flavor fish and seafood in Sweden, for example, gravlax and various herring pickles, among them the traditional,<span> </span><b>sill i dill</b><span> </span>(literally "herring in dill"). In contrast to the various fish dishes flavored with dill, there is also a traditional Swedish dish called, dillkött, which is a meaty stew flavored with dill. The dish commonly contains pieces of veal or lamb that are boiled until tender and then served together with a vinegary dill sauce. Dill seeds may be used in breads or<span> </span>akvavit. A newer, non-traditional use of dill is to pair it with chives as a flavoring for potato chips. These are called "dillchips" and are quite popular in Sweden.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Asian_and_Middle_Eastern_cooking">Asian and Middle Eastern cooking</span></h3> <table class="wikitable"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Nation/Region</td> <td>Language</td> <td>Local Name of Ingredient (Dill)</td> <td>Dish(es) Commonly Used In</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Marathi, Konkani</td> <td>Shepu (शेपू)</td> <td>Shepuchi Bhaji, Shepu Pulao, Ashe Mast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Hindi</td> <td>Soa / Soya (सोआ)</td> <td>Soa Sabzi(with potato).As a flavor in:- Green Kheema, Kheema samosa</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Kannada</td> <td>sabbasige soppu (ಸಬೈಗೆ ಸೊಪ್ಪು)</td> <td>Curry</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Telugu</td> <td>Soa-Kura (శత పుష్పం)</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Tamil</td> <td>Sadakuppi (சதகுப்பி)</td> <td>Curry</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Malayalam</td> <td>Chatakuppa (ചതകുപ്പ)</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Punjabi</td> <td>Soa</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Gujarati</td> <td>Suva</td> <td>Suvaa ni Bhaji(with potato)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Iran</td> <td>Persian</td> <td>Shevid</td> <td>Aash, Baghali Polo, Shevid Polo, Mast O Khiar</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Arab world</td> <td>Arabic</td> <td>شبت، شبث (shabat, shabath)</td> <td>As flavoring in various dishes</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Thailand</td> <td>Thai</td> <td>phak chee Lao(ผักชีลาว)</td> <td>Gaeng om(แกงอ่อม)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Vietnam</td> <td>Vietnamese</td> <td>Thì là</td> <td>Many fish dishes in Northern Vietnam</td> </tr> <tr> <td>China</td> <td>Chinese</td> <td>shiluo</td> <td>baozi</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In<span> </span>Iran, dill is known as<span> </span><i>shevid</i><span> </span>and sometimes, is used with rice and called<span> </span><i>shevid-polo</i>. It also is used in Iranian<span> </span><i>aash</i><span> </span>recipes, and similarly, is called<span> </span><i lang="fas-Latn" title="Persian-language romanization">sheved</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Persian.</p> <p>In<span> </span>India, dill is known as "Sholpa" in Bengali,<span> </span><i lang="mar-Latn" title="Marathi-language romanization">shepu</i><span> </span>(शेपू) in Marathi and Konkani,<span> </span><i lang="hin-Latn" title="Hindi-language romanization">savaa</i><span> </span>in Hindi, or<span> </span><i lang="pan-Latn" title="Panjabi-language romanization">soa</i><span> </span>in Punjabi. In Telugu, it is called<span> </span><i>Soa-kura</i><span> </span>(for herb greens). It also is called<span> </span><i lang="kan-Latn" title="Kannada-language romanization">sabbasige soppu</i><span> </span>(ಸಬ್ಬಸಿಗೆ ಸೊಪ್ಪು) in<span> </span>Kannada. In<span> </span>Tamil<span> </span>it is known as<span> </span><i lang="tam-Latn" title="Tamil-language romanization">sada kuppi</i><span> </span>(சதகுப்பி). In<span> </span>Malayalam, it is ചതകുപ്പ (<i lang="mal-Latn" title="Malayalam-language romanization">chathakuppa</i>) or ശതകുപ്പ (<i lang="mal-Latn" title="Malayalam-language romanization">sathakuppa</i>). In Sanskrit, this herb is called<span> </span><i lang="san-Latn" title="Sanskrit-language romanization">shatapushpa</i>. In Gujarati, it is known as<span> </span><i lang="guj-Latn" title="Gujarati-language romanization">suva</i><span> </span>(સૂવા). In India, dill is prepared in the manner of yellow<span> </span><i>moong dal</i>, as a main-course dish. It is considered to have very good antiflatulent properties, so it is used as<span> </span><i>mukhwas</i>, or an after-meal digestive. Traditionally, it is given to mothers immediately after childbirth. In the state of Uttar Pradesh in India, a small amount of fresh dill is cooked along with cut potatoes and fresh fenugreek leaves (Hindi आलू-मेथी-सोया).</p> <p>In<span> </span>Manipur, dill, locally known as<span> </span><i lang="mni-Latn" title="Meitei-language romanization">pakhon</i>, is an essential ingredient of<span> </span><i lang="mni-Latn" title="Meitei-language romanization">chagem pomba</i><span> </span>– a traditional Manipuri dish made with fermented soybean and rice.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Laos<span> </span>and parts of northern<span> </span>Thailand, dill is known in English as Lao coriander (Lao:<span> </span><span lang="lo">ຜັກຊີ</span><span> </span>or<span> </span>Thai:<span> </span><span lang="th">ผักชีลาว</span>),<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>and served as a side with salad yum or papaya salad. In the<span> </span>Lao language, it is called<span> </span><i>phak see</i>, and in<span> </span>Thai, it is known as<span> </span><i>phak chee Lao</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup><span> </span>In<span> </span>Lao cuisine, Lao coriander is used extensively in traditional Lao dishes such as<span> </span><i>mok pa</i><span> </span>(steamed fish in banana leaf) and several coconut milk curries that contain fish or<span> </span>prawns.</p> <p>In<span> </span>China<span> </span>dill is called colloquially,<span> </span><i>huíxiāng</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">茴香</span>, perfums of Hui people), or more properly<span> </span><i>shíluó</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">莳萝</span>). It is a common filling in<span> </span>baozi<span> </span>and<span> </span>xianbing<span> </span>and may be used as vegetarian with rice vermicelli, or combined with either meat or eggs. Vegetarian dill baozi are a common part of a Beijing breakfast. In baozi and xianbing, it often is interchangeable with non-bulbing<span> </span>fennel<span> </span>and the term<span> </span><span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">茴香</span><span> </span>also may refer to fennel, similarly to caraway and coriander leaf, sharing a name in Chinese as well. Dill also may be<span> </span>stir fried<span> </span>as a potherb, often with egg, in the same manner as<span> </span>Chinese chives. It commonly is used in<span> </span>Taiwan<span> </span>as well. In Northern China,<span> </span>Beijing,<span> </span>Inner-Mongolia,<span> </span>Ningxia,<span> </span>Gansu, and<span> </span>Xinjiang, dill seeds commonly are called<span> </span><i>zīrán</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">孜然</span>), but also<span> </span><i>kūmíng</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">枯茗</span>),<span> </span><i>kūmíngzi</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">枯茗子</span>),<span> </span><i>shíluózi</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">莳萝子</span>),<span> </span><i>xiǎohuíxiāngzi</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">小茴香子</span>) and are used with pepper for lamb meat. In the whole of China,<span> </span><i>yángchuàn</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">羊串</span>) or<span> </span><i>yángròu chuàn</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">羊肉串</span>), lamb<span> </span>brochette, a speciality from<span> </span>Uyghurs, uses cumin and pepper.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Vietnam, the use of dill in cooking is regional. It is used mainly in northern Vietnamese cuisine.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Middle_East_uses">Middle East uses</span></h3> <p>In Arab countries, dill seed, called<span> </span><i lang="ara-Latn" title="Arabic-language romanization">ain jaradeh</i><span> </span>(grasshopper's eye), is used as a spice in cold dishes such as<span> </span><i>fattoush</i><span> </span>and pickles. In Arab countries of the<span> </span>Persian Gulf, dill is called<span> </span><i>shibint</i><span> </span>and is used mostly in fish dishes. In<span> </span>Egypt, dillweed is commonly used to flavor<span> </span>cabbage<span> </span>dishes, including<span> </span><i>mahshi koronb</i><span> </span>(stuffed cabbage leaves).<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><span> </span>In Israel, dill weed is used in salads and also to flavor omelettes, often alongside parsley. It is known in Hebrew as<span> </span><i lang="heb-Latn" title="Hebrew-language romanization">shammir</i><span> </span>(שמיר).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>Successful cultivation requires warm to hot summers with high sunshine levels; even partial shade will reduce the yield substantially.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><span> </span>It also prefers rich, well-drained soil. The seeds are viable for three to ten years.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><span> </span>The plants are somewhat<span> </span>monocarpic<span> </span>and quickly die after "bolting" (producing seeds). Hot temperatures may quicken bolting.<sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>The seed is harvested by cutting the flower heads off the stalks when the seed is beginning to ripen. The seed heads are placed upside down in a paper bag and left in a warm, dry place for a week. The seeds then separate from the stems easily for storage in an airtight container.</p> <p>These plants, like their fennel and parsley relatives, often are eaten by<span> </span>Black swallowtail caterpillars<span> </span>in areas where that species occurs.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup><span> </span>For this reason, they may be included in some<span> </span>butterfly gardens.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Companion_planting">Companion planting</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG/220px-Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG" decoding="async" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG/330px-Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG/440px-Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG 2x" data-file-width="1772" data-file-height="1329" title="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Dill plants</div> </div> </div> <p>When used as a<span> </span>companion plant, dill attracts many beneficial insects as the umbrella flower heads go to seed. It makes a good companion plant for cucumbers and broccoli.</p> <p>It is a poor companion plant for carrots and tomatoes.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Cover lightly with substrate</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">min. 15 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-3 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;"><em> </em></span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
MHS 121 (2g)
Herb Dill Bouquet Seeds 1.6 - 4
15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah'' 9.95 - 2

15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah''

Prijs € 9,95 SKU: VE 180 (10g)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah'' (apium graveolens)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Price for Package of 15.000 seeds (10g)</span></strong></span></h2> <div>Crunchy, tender and string-less, this vigorous and popular green variety has thick, well-rounded 11” stalks and tightly folded hearts.  A late maturing variety, ideal for autumn use.</div> <div>Apium graveolens is a plant species in the family Apiaceae commonly known as celery (var. dulce) or celeriac (var. rapaceum), depending on whether the petioles (stalks) or roots are eaten: celery refers to the former and celeriac to the latter. Apium graveolens grows to 1 m tall. The leaves are pinnate to bipinnate leaves with rhombic leaflets 3–6 cm long and 2–4 cm broad. The flowers are creamy-white, 2–3 mm diameter, produced in dense compound umbels. The seeds are broad ovoid to globose, 1.5–2 mm long and wide.</div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18 - 20°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">12°C: 32 Days</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">20°C: 15 days</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
VE 180 (10g)
15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah'' 9.95 - 2
Utah Celery Seeds (apium...

Utah Celery Seeds (apium...

Prijs € 1,55 SKU: MHS 135
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Celery ''Utah'' Finest Seeds (apium graveolens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1500 (1g) or 3000 (2g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Crunchy, tender, and string-less, this vigorous and popular green variety has thick, well-rounded 11” stalks and tightly folded hearts.  A late maturing variety, ideal for autumn use.</p> <p>Apium graveolens is a plant species in the family Apiaceae commonly known as celery (var. dulce) or celeriac (var. rapaceum), depending on whether the petioles (stalks) or roots are eaten: celery refers to the former and celeriac to the latter. Apium graveolens grows to 1 m tall.</p> <p>The leaves are pinnate to bipinnate leaves with rhombic leaflets 3–6 cm long and 2–4 cm broad. The flowers are creamy-white, 2–3 mm diameter, produced in dense compound umbels. The seeds are broad ovoid to globose, 1.5–2 mm long and wide.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 135 (1g)
Utah Celery Seeds (apium graveolens)

Deze plant heeft gigantische vruchten
Celeriac Seeds Giant Prague

Knolselderij Zaden Giant...

Prijs € 1,25 SKU: VE 16
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Knolselderij Zaden Giant Prague</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Prijs voor een verpakking van 2000 (1 g), 20000 (10 g) zaden.</strong></span></h2> <p>Knolselderij is niet zo gemakkelijk te telen als wel eens wordt beweerd. Heel vaak hebben we hier al knolselderij geteeld, met als resultaat een klein onregelmatig gevormd knolletje in de herfst.</p> <p>Toch blijven we het proberen want de smaak van die kleine knollen is wel heel lekker en sterk (bedenk: veel sterker dan de knolselderij uit de winkel!). En de laatste jaren lukt het steeds beter (zie daarvoor het stukje bij teeltwijzen over de standplaats).</p> <p>Je eet dus de knol, erg lekker in de erwtensoep. Het blad is ook eetbaar (zoals dat van snijselderij), maar bedenk wel dat de planten via het blad voeding opneemt voor de groei van de knol. Liever dus niet teveel van oogsten tijdens de groei, al mag zo af en toe een paar takjes natuurlijk wel. Maar teel voor oogst van het blad liever echte snijselderij (geeft ook veel meer opbrengst van blad).</p> <p><strong>Teeltwijzen</strong></p> <p>Knolselderij heeft heel lang nodig om een knol te maken, er zijn dus geen meerdere zaaimomenten per jaar: zaai zo vroeg mogelijk (en oogst zo laat mogelijk).</p> <p>Knolselderij heeft eigenlijk een lastig plekje in de vruchtwisseling: ze is een schermbloemige, maar maakt ook een knol. De bemesting is echter zwaarder dan van de andere wortelgewassen als worteltjes en bietjes en uien. En sinds een paar jaar komt ze hier vaak terecht op het perceel bij de koolgewassen of bij de bladgewassen. Misschien niet helemaal volgens de regels van de vruchtwisseling maar sinds we haar telen op een zwaarder bemeste grond oogsten we hier in het najaar mooie, dikke knolselderijen met prima smaak.</p> <p><strong>Rassen</strong></p> <p>De bekendste rassen zijn Giant Prague (ook wel Prager Reuzen genoemd), Monarch en Brilliant. Zelf hebben we alle drie de rassen wel eens geprobeerd en we merken niet echt heel veel verschil tussen die rassen, we gebruiken nu al een paar jaar Monarch en zijn daar dus prima tevreden over. Er schijnen ook nog wel rassen te bestaan die een kleinere knol geven en meer blad. Let bij de aankoop van zaden dus op wat er in de beschrijving bij staat.</p> <p><strong>Zaaien</strong></p> <p>Selderijzaad in het algemeen (dus ook snijselderij en bleekselderij – haar zusjes) kiemt traag (3 tot 4 weken). Ik zaai ze zelf het liefst thuis voor (zo rond maart), dan kiemen de zaden wat sneller dan bij voorzaaien in de kas (maar dat gaat verder ook best goed hoor). Ter plaatse zaaien heb ik nooit geprobeerd maar lijkt me eerlijk gezegd ook geen optie (het zaad is maar heel klein/fijn, te koud, tussen het onkruid vind je de zaailingen na 4 weken niet meer, etc.). Zaai in potjes zodat je niet hoeft te verspenen maar de zaailingen gelijk mooi egaal maar ook al flink kunnen uitgroeien voor het uitplanten.</p> <p>Pas dan wel op dat bij overbrengen naar de tuin je daar niet de koudste dagen voor kiest, anders is de overgang wel erg groot. Eventueel kun je eerst nog wat afharden door de zaailingen nog een week of 2 in de kas of platte bak te zetten, of overdag buiten zetten en ’s nachts naar binnen halen.</p> <p><strong>Bodem, bemesting en teeltzorgen</strong></p> <p>Knolselderij heeft graag zwaardere grond, ze kunnen goed tegen de vette klei en gebruiken relatief veel voeding.</p> <p>Naast de basisbewerking van het onderspitten van oude stalmest en/of compost geven wij in het voorjaar een flinke hand koemestkorrels. En voor de groei van de knol krijgt ze voor het planten ook nog een een handje patenkali.</p> <p>Geef tijdens de groei verder geen extra en snelwerkende meststoffen meer: knolselderij kan erg slecht tegen wisselende omstandigheden (ze wil langzaam maar gestaag groeien). Plotseling giften van kunstmest of bijvoorbeeld bloedmeel geeft slechte knollen, die sponzig kunnen zijn of kunnen gaan rotten.</p> <p>Water geven in droge periodes is erg belangrijk; onderbrekingen in de langzaam-maar-gestage groei van de knolselderij is niet gewenst.</p> <p><strong>Oogst en bewaren</strong></p> <p>De knol kan nog flink doorgroeien in de nazomer en herfst; oogst dus niet te vroeg, wacht het liefst tot eind oktober – begin november (afhankelijk ook van het weer want knolselderij kan niet zo heel goed tegen vorst). Trek bij de oogst de knol uit de grond en knip gelijk het loof eraf (anders wordt de knol zacht). De knollen kun je dan (mits ze gezond zijn en je ze donker, koel maar vorstvrij kunt bewaren) nog een paar weken bewaren.</p> <p>Hier doen we dat niet meer hoor; wel eens gehad dat de knollen van binnen zwart werden en gingen rotten. Wij oogsten de knollen, maken ze schoon en raspen ze grof of hakselen ze grof in de keukenmachine. Dan gaan ze zo rauw de vriezer in; bij het maken van erwtensoep gooi ik dan een zakje bevroren knolselderij in het kokende water, en dat werkt prima.</p> <p></p> </body> </html>
VE 16 (1g)
Celeriac Seeds Giant Prague
Black Caraway, Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa) 2.45 - 1

Black Caraway, Black Cumin...

Prijs € 2,15 SKU: MHS 128
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black Caraway, Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 500 (1.5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">You may or may not have heard of Black seed (nigella sativa) before. It goes by many names, including black caraway, Roman coriander, and black cumin, to name a few. But no matter what you call it, these seeds are loaded with health benefits that we are only beginning to understand. From eliminating harmful bacteria to regenerating the body’s cells and tissues, here are 10 awesome research-backed health benefits of black cumin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Nigella sativa (black seeds), an annual flowering plant that grows to 20-30cm tall, is native to Asia and the Middle East. The flowers of this plant are very delicate and pale colored and white. The seeds are used in Middle Eastern cooking, such as in their local breads. The seeds are also used by thousands for their natural healing abilities.</span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>1.&nbsp;Type 2 diabetes –&nbsp;</strong>Researchers found&nbsp;that just two grams daily of black seed could result in reduced fasting blood sugar levels, along with decreased insulin resistance, and increased beta-cell function in the pancreas.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>2.&nbsp;Epilepsy –&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;Published in&nbsp;<em>Medical Science Monitor</em><em>,&nbsp;</em>one study found black seed to be effective at reducing the frequency of seizures in children who resisted conventional treatment. Black seed indeed has anti-convulsive properties.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>3.&nbsp;Colon Cancer –</strong>&nbsp;In cell studies, black seed has been found to have anti-cancer properties, inhibiting the growth of colon cancer cells specifically. In&nbsp;one animal study, the seed was able to&nbsp;<strong>fight colon cancer in rats successfully with no observable side effects</strong>. The same obviously can’t be said for conventional cancer treatments.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>4.&nbsp;MRSA –</strong>&nbsp;The deadly and antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection known commonly as MRSA responded favorably to treatment with black seed in&nbsp;this study&nbsp;from the University of Health Sciences in Lahore, Pakistan.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>5.&nbsp;Protection Against Heart Attack Damage –</strong>&nbsp;An extract from black seed has been shown to possess&nbsp;heart-protective qualities, dampening&nbsp;damages associated with heart attacks and boosting overall heart health.</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Read:&nbsp;Health Benefits of 60+ Foods</strong></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>6.&nbsp;Breast Cancer –</strong>&nbsp;A few studies have linked a thymoquinone extract from nigella sativa to reduced breast&nbsp;cancer tumor growth&nbsp;and&nbsp;increased apoptosis&nbsp;(cell death) in breast cancer cells.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>7.&nbsp;Brain Cancer –</strong>&nbsp;A study published in the online journal&nbsp;<em>PLoS One</em>&nbsp;indicates thymoquinone from black seed can induce cell death in glioblastoma cells.&nbsp;<strong>Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive brain tumors of all.</strong></span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>8.&nbsp;Leukemia –</strong>&nbsp;As it’s been shown to do with other types of cancer, black seed compound thymoquinone has also been shown to&nbsp;induce apoptosis&nbsp;in leukemia cells.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>9.&nbsp;Brain Damage from Lead –</strong>&nbsp;A study published in&nbsp;<em>Experimental and Toxicologic Pathology&nbsp;</em>&nbsp;indicates black seed is able to dampen and reverse damage to the brain sparked by lead toxicity.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>10.&nbsp;Oral Cancer –&nbsp;</strong>Research indicates&nbsp;thymoquinone from nigella sativa is able to induce cell apoptosis in oral cancer cells.</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">These ten benefits of nigella sativa are truly only the tip of the iceberg. Mounting evidence indicates this seed is a powerful healer.&nbsp;<strong>Stay tuned for Part 2 of this article where we’ll add to the list of benefits.&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Other Names:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Ajenuz, Aranuel, Baraka, Black Cumin, Black Caraway, Charnuska, Cheveux de Vénus, Cominho Negro, Comino Negro, Cumin Noir, Fennel Flower, Fitch, Graine de Nigelle, Graine Noire, Kalajaji, Kalajira, Kalonji, La Grainer Noire, Love in a Mist, Mugrela, Nielle, Nigella sativa, Nigelle de Crête, Nigelle Cultivée, Nutmeg Flower, Poivrette, Roman-Coriander, Schwarzkummel, Small Fennel, Toute Épice, Upakuncika.</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 128 (1,5g)
Black Caraway, Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa) 2.45 - 1
Herb Caraway Seeds

Herb Caraway Seeds (Carum...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: MHS 9
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Herb Caraway Seeds (Carum carvi) Meridian Fennel, Persian cumin</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 900 seeds (2g).</strong></span></h2> <div>One of the most popular herbs today, caraway has long been prized for the excellence of its aromatic dried seeds as a condiment, added to bread &amp; cheeses and an aid to digestion.  A hardy, biennial herb native to Europe and Western Asia growing 1 ½ ft  with attractive feathery leaves and white flowers from mid summer on the end of branches resembling carrot flowers. In the first year plants resemble carrots, growing to about 8 inches tall with finely divided leaves and long taproots, maturing and flowering in the second season.  The entire caraway plant is edible. The roots may be boiled and treated like cooked parsnips or carrots. The young leaves can be used in salads or for seasoning soups and stews. The licorice flavored seeds give ryebread its characteristic taste but are also good in potato soup, cheese spreads, sauerkraut and salad dressings. Several liqueurs are made with caraway, including Kummel and some Schnapps.</div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">18-20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
MHS 9
Herb Caraway Seeds
Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)

Bolivian Coriander - Papalo...

Prijs € 2,25 SKU: MHS 80
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Porophyllum ruderale is an herbaceous annual plant whose leaves can be used for seasoning food. The taste has been described as "somewhere between arugula, cilantro and rue."[1] The plant is commonly grown in Mexico and South America for use in salsas. When fully grown, this plant grows to about 5 feet in height and 3 feet in diameter.</p> <p>The plant is easy to grow from seed in a well drained soil, which should be allowed to dry between watering.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Culture</strong></p> <p>Having been used by many cultures, Porophyllum ruderale is known by many names, including Bolivian coriander, quillquiña (also spelled quirquiña or quilquiña), yerba porosa, killi, pápalo, tepegua, "mampuritu" and pápaloquelite. Despite the name "Bolivian coriander", this plant is not botanically related to Coriandrum sativum.</p> <p> </p> <p>This plant is known in Mexico as pápaloquelite, commonly accompanying the famous Mexican tacos. Not all Mexicans enjoy its taste, but some find that it improves the flavor of tacos and typical Mexican salsas and soups.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Puebla cuisine, pápalo is used as a condiment on traditional cemita sandwiches, a regional type of Mexican torta.</p> <p>Papalo was used in the Azteca era, but never as medicine, only as food.[citation needed]</p> <p>One study claims that Papalo exhibits some health benefits such as: lowering cholesterol, lowering blood pressure, and aiding digestion.</p> <p> </p> <table style="width:551px;" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Instructions</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Propagation:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Pretreat:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Stratification:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Time:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Depth:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Mix:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Germination temperature:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Location:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Germination Time:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Watering:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p><strong><span style="color:#008000;"> </span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><br /><strong><span style="color:#008000;"> <em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></strong></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
MHS 80
Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)
Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum...

Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum...

Prijs € 2,05 SKU: MHS 117
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Coriander Seeds Herb (Coriandrum Sativum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 seeds (2g).</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Coriander</b><span> </span>(<span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="/ˌ/: secondary stress follows">ˌ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span><span title="/ɒr/: 'or' in 'moral'">ɒr</span><span title="/i/: 'y' in 'happy'">i</span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'d' in 'dye'">d</span><span title="/ər/: 'er' in 'letter'">ər</span></span>,<span class="wrap"><span> </span></span><span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span><span title="/ɒr/: 'or' in 'moral'">ɒr</span><span title="/i/: 'y' in 'happy'">i</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'d' in 'dye'">d</span><span title="/ər/: 'er' in 'letter'">ər</span></span>/</span></span>;<sup id="cite_ref-epd_coriander_1-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span><i>Coriandrum sativum</i>) is an<span> </span>annual<span> </span>herb<span> </span>in the family<span> </span>Apiaceae. It is also known as<span> </span><b>Chinese parsley</b>, and in North America, the stems and leaves are usually called<span> </span><b>cilantro</b><span> </span>(<span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="'s' in 'sigh'">s</span><span title="/ɪ/: 'i' in 'kit'">ɪ</span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'l' in 'lie'">l</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'t' in 'tie'">t</span><span title="'r' in 'rye'">r</span><span title="/oʊ/: 'o' in 'code'">oʊ</span></span>,<span class="wrap"><span> </span></span>-<span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'l' in 'lie'">l</span><span title="/ɑː/: 'a' in 'father'">ɑː</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span></span>-/</span></span>).<sup id="cite_ref-epd_cilantro_2-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds (as a<span> </span>spice) are the parts most traditionally used in cooking.</p> <p>Most people perceive the taste of coriander leaves as a tart, lemon/lime taste, but a smaller group of about 3–21% of people tested (depending on ethnicity) think the leaves taste like<span> </span>dish soap, linked to a<span> </span>gene<span> </span>which detects some specific<span> </span>aldehydes<span> </span>that are also used as odorant substances in many soaps and detergents</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Botanical_description">Botanical description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7c/Coriandrum_sativum_003.JPG/225px-Coriandrum_sativum_003.JPG" width="225" height="225" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flowers of<i><span> </span>Coriandrum sativum</i></div> </div> </div> <p>Coriander is native to regions spanning from<span> </span>Southern Europe<span> </span>and<span> </span>Northern Africa<span> </span>to<span> </span>Southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 50 cm (20 in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are borne in small<span> </span>umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the center of the umbel longer (5–6 mm or 0.20–0.24 in) than those pointing toward it (only 1–3 mm or 0.039–0.118 in long). The<span> </span>fruit<span> </span>is a globular, dry<span> </span>schizocarp<span> </span>3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in) in diameter. Pollen size is approximately 33 microns.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/69/Coriander-2019-5-11_20-17-8-01.jpg/220px-Coriander-2019-5-11_20-17-8-01.jpg" width="220" height="292" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander pollen</div> </div> </div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <p>First attested in English in the late 14th century, the word "coriander" derives from the<span> </span>Old French:<span> </span><i>coriandre</i>, which comes from<span> </span>Latin:<span> </span><i>coriandrum</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>in turn from<span> </span>Ancient Greek:<span> </span><span lang="grc" xml:lang="grc">κορίαννον</span>,<span> </span><i>koriannon</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>derived from<span> </span>Ancient Greek:<span> </span><span lang="grc" xml:lang="grc">κόρις</span>,<span> </span><i>kóris</i><span> </span>(a bed bug), and was given on account of its foetid, bed bug-like smell.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>The earliest attested form of the word is the<span> </span>Mycenaean Greek<span> </span><i><i>ko-ri-ja-da-na</i></i><sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup><span> </span>written in<span> </span>Linear B<span> </span>syllabic script (reconstructed as<span> </span><i><i>koriadnon</i></i>, similar to the name of<span> </span>Minos's daughter<span> </span>Ariadne) which later evolved to<span> </span><i>koriannon</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>koriandron</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-Chadwick_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>koriander</i><span> </span>(German).<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-0" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <p><i><i>Cilantro</i></i><span> </span>is the Spanish word for coriander, also deriving from<span> </span><i>coriandrum</i>. It is the common term in<span> </span>North American<span> </span>English<span> </span>for coriander leaves, due to their extensive use in<span> </span>Mexican cuisine.<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-1" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Origin">Origin</span></h2> <p>Although native to<span> </span>Iran,<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>coriander grows wild over a wide area of Western Asia and Southern Europe, prompting the comment: "It is hard to define exactly where this plant is wild and where it only recently established itself."<sup id="cite_ref-ZoharyHopf_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>Fifteen desiccated<span> </span>mericarps<span> </span>were found in the<span> </span>Pre-Pottery Neolithic B<span> </span>level of the<span> </span>Nahal Hemar<span> </span>Cave in<span> </span>Israel, which may be the oldest archaeological find of coriander. About half a litre of coriander mericarps was recovered from the tomb of<span> </span>Tutankhamen, and because this plant does not grow wild in Egypt, Zohary and Hopf interpret this find as proof that coriander was cultivated by the<span> </span>ancient Egyptians.<sup id="cite_ref-ZoharyHopf_12-1" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <p>Coriander seems to have been cultivated in Greece since at least the second millennium BC. One of the<span> </span>Linear B<span> </span>tablets recovered from<span> </span>Pylos<span> </span>refers to the species as being cultivated for the manufacture of perfumes; it apparently was used in two forms: as a spice for its seeds and as a herb for the flavour of its leaves.<sup id="cite_ref-Chadwick_9-1" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>This appears to be confirmed by archaeological evidence from the same period; the large quantities of the species retrieved from an<span> </span>Early Bronze Age<span> </span>layer at<span> </span>Sitagroi<span> </span>in<span> </span>Macedonia<span> </span>could point to cultivation of the species at that time.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking, Coriander is used in cuisines throughout the world.<sup id="cite_ref-Samuelsson_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/Corriander_leaves-Cocunut_chutney.jpg/280px-Corriander_leaves-Cocunut_chutney.jpg" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Coriander leaves in coconut<span> </span>chutney</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><span> </span></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e1/Minty_pani_puri.jpg/280px-Minty_pani_puri.jpg" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Minty pani puri</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><span> </span></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/be/Onion_Corriander_Paratha.JPG/280px-Onion_Corriander_Paratha.JPG" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Onion coriander<span> </span>paratha</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> <div></div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Leaves">Leaves</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/51/A_scene_of_Coriander_leaves.JPG/220px-A_scene_of_Coriander_leaves.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander leaves</div> </div> </div> <p>The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, dhania, Chinese parsley, or (in the US and commercially in Canada) cilantro.</p> <p>Coriander potentially may be confused with<span> </span>culantro<span> </span>(<i>Eryngium foetidum</i><span> </span>L.), an<span> </span>Apiaceae<span> </span>like coriander (<i>Coriandrum sativum</i><span> </span>L.), but from a different<span> </span>genus. Culantro has a distinctly different spiny appearance, a more potent volatile leaf oil<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><span> </span>and a stronger aroma.</p> <p>The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with<span> </span>citrus<span> </span>overtones.<sup id="cite_ref-McGee_16-0" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <p>The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many South Asian foods (such as<span> </span>chutneys<span> </span>and salads); in Chinese, Thai, and Burmese dishes; in Mexican cooking, particularly in<span> </span>salsa<span> </span>and<span> </span>guacamole<span> </span>and as a garnish; and in salads in Russia and other<span> </span>CIS<span> </span>countries. In Portugal, chopped coriander is used in the bread soup<span> </span>Açorda, and in India, chopped coriander is a garnish on Indian dishes such as<span> </span><i>dal</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-Moulin_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup><span> </span>As heat diminishes their flavour, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. In Indian and Central Asian recipes, coriander leaves are used in large amounts and cooked until the flavour diminishes.<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-2" class="reference">[10]</sup><span> </span>The leaves spoil quickly when removed from the plant, and lose their aroma when dried or frozen.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Seeds">Seeds</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/86/Coriander_Seeds.jpg/220px-Coriander_Seeds.jpg" width="220" height="147" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Dried coriander fruits, often called "coriander seeds" when used as a spice</div> </div> </div> <p>The dry fruits are known as coriander seeds. The word "coriander" in food preparation may refer solely to these seeds (as a spice), rather than to the plant. The seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed, due to<span> </span>terpenes<span> </span>linalool<span> </span>and<span> </span>pinene. It is described as warm, nutty, spicy, and orange-flavoured.</p> <p>The variety<span> </span><i>C. s. vulgare</i><span> </span>has a fruit diameter of 3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in), while var.<span> </span><i>C. s. microcarpum</i><span> </span>fruits have a diameter of 1.5–3 mm (0.06–0.12 in). Large-fruited types are grown mainly by tropical and subtropical countries, e.g. Morocco, India, and Australia, and contain a low volatile oil content (0.1-0.4%). They are used extensively for grinding and blending purposes in the spice trade. Types with smaller fruit are produced in temperate regions and usually have a volatile oil content around 0.4-1.8%, so are highly valued as a raw material for the preparation of essential oil.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup></p> <p>Coriander is commonly found both as whole dried seeds and in<span> </span>ground<span> </span>form. Roasting or heating the seeds in a dry pan heightens the flavour, aroma, and pungency. Ground coriander seed loses flavour quickly in storage and is best ground fresh. Coriander seed is a spice in<span> </span><i>garam masala</i><span> </span>and<span> </span>Indian<span> </span>curries which often employ the ground fruits in generous amounts together with<span> </span>cumin, acting as a thickener in a mixture called<span> </span><i>dhana jeera</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Roasted coriander seeds, called<span> </span><i>dhana dal</i>, are eaten as a snack. They are the main ingredient of the two south Indian dishes<span> </span><i>sambhar</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>rasam</i>.</p> <p>Outside of Asia, coriander seed is used widely in the process for<span> </span>pickling<span> </span>vegetables. In Germany and South Africa (see<span> </span><i>boerewors</i>), the seeds are used while making sausages. In Russia and Central Europe, coriander seed is an occasional ingredient in<span> </span>rye<span> </span>bread (e.g.<span> </span>Borodinsky bread), as an alternative to<span> </span>caraway. The<span> </span>Zuni people<span> </span>of North America have adapted it into their cuisine, mixing the powdered seeds ground with chili and using it as a condiment with meat, and eating leaves as a salad.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup></p> <p>Coriander seeds are used in brewing certain styles of beer, particularly some Belgian<span> </span>wheat beers. The coriander seeds are used with orange peel to add a citrus character. Coriander seed is one of the main traditional ingredients in the South African<span> </span>Boerewors, a spiced mixed-meat sausage.</p> <p>One preliminary study showed coriander<span> </span>essential oil<span> </span>to inhibit<span> </span>Gram-positive<span> </span>and<span> </span>Gram-negative bacteria, including<span> </span><i>Staphylococcus aureus</i>,<span> </span><i>Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa,</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>Escherichia coli</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <p>Coriander is listed as one of the original ingredients in the<span> </span>secret formula<span> </span>for<span> </span>Coca-Cola.<sup id="cite_ref-22" class="reference">[22]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Roots">Roots</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Coriander_roots.JPG/220px-Coriander_roots.JPG" width="220" height="148" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander roots</div> </div> </div> <p>Coriander<span> </span>roots<span> </span>have a deeper, more intense flavor than the leaves, and are used in a variety of Asian cuisines, especially in<span> </span>Thai dishes<span> </span>such as soups or<span> </span>curry pastes.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Coriander (cilantro) leaves, raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>95 kJ (23 kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>3.67 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>0.87</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.8 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.52 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>2.13 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A equiv. <div>beta-Carotene</div> <div>lutein<span> </span>zeaxanthin</div> </th> <td> <div>42%</div> 337 μg <div> <div>36%</div> 3930 μg</div> <div>865 μg</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine<span> </span><span>(B1)</span></th> <td> <div>6%</div> 0.067 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin<span> </span><span>(B2)</span></th> <td> <div>14%</div> 0.162 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin<span> </span><span>(B3)</span></th> <td> <div>7%</div> 1.114 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid<span> </span><span>(B5)</span></th> <td> <div>11%</div> 0.57 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>11%</div> 0.149 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate<span> </span><span>(B9)</span></th> <td> <div>16%</div> 62 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>33%</div> 27 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>17%</div> 2.5 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin K</th> <td> <div>295%</div> 310 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 67 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>14%</div> 1.77 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 26 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>20%</div> 0.426 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 48 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>11%</div> 521 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 46 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>5%</div> 0.5 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Water</th> <td>92.21 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr /> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span> </span>micrograms • mg =<span> </span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span> </span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span> </span>US recommendations<span> </span>for adults.<span> </span><br /><span class="nowrap"><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Raw coriander leaves are 92% water, 4%<span> </span>carbohydrates, 2%<span> </span>protein, and less than 1%<span> </span>fat<span> </span>(table). The nutritional profile of coriander seeds is different from the fresh stems or leaves. In a 100 gram reference amount, leaves are particularly rich in<span> </span>vitamin A,<span> </span>vitamin Cand<span> </span>vitamin K, with moderate content of<span> </span>dietary minerals<span> </span>(table). Although seeds generally have lower content of vitamins, they do provide significant amounts of<span> </span>dietary fiber,<span> </span>calcium,<span> </span>selenium,<span> </span>iron,<span> </span>magnesium<span> </span>and<span> </span>manganese.<sup id="cite_ref-23" class="reference">[23]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Taste_and_smell">Taste and smell</span></h2> <p>The<span> </span>essential oil<span> </span>from coriander leaves and seeds contains mixed<span> </span>polyphenols<span> </span>and<span> </span>terpenes, including<span> </span>linalool<span> </span>as the major constituent accounting for the aroma and flavor of coriander.<sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference">[24]</sup></p> <p>Different people may perceive the taste of coriander leaves differently. Those who enjoy it say it has a refreshing, lemony or lime-like flavor, while those who dislike it have a strong aversion to its taste and smell, characterizing it as soapy or rotten.<sup id="cite_ref-McGee_16-1" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-25" class="reference">[25]</sup><span> </span>Studies also show variations in preference among different ethnic groups: 21% of East Asians, 17% of Caucasians, and 14% of people of African descent expressed a dislike for coriander, but among the groups where coriander is popular in their cuisine, only 7% of South Asians, 4% of Hispanics, and 3% of Middle Eastern subjects expressed a dislike.<sup id="cite_ref-26" class="reference">[26]</sup></p> <p>Studies have shown that 80% of identical twins shared the same preference for the herb, but fraternal twins agreed only about half the time, strongly suggesting a genetic component to the preference. In a genetic survey of nearly 30,000 people, two genetic variants linked to the perception of coriander have been found, the most common of which is a gene involved in sensing smells.<sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[27]</sup><span> </span>The gene,<span> </span><i>OR6A2</i>, lies within a cluster of olfactory-receptor genes and encodes a receptor that is highly sensitive to<span> </span>aldehydechemicals. Flavor chemists have found that the coriander aroma is created by a half-dozen or so substances, and most of these are aldehydes. Those who dislike the taste are sensitive to the offending<span> </span>unsaturated<span> </span>aldehydes and at the same time may be unable to detect the aromatic chemicals that others find pleasant.<sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference">[28]</sup><span> </span>Association between its taste and several other genes, including a bitter-taste receptor, have also been found.<sup id="cite_ref-nature-soapy-taste_3-1" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Allergy">Allergy</span></h2> <p>Some people are allergic to coriander leaves or seeds, having symptoms similar to those of other<span> </span>food allergies.<sup id="cite_ref-aip_30-0" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>In one study, 32% of<span> </span>pin-prick<span> </span>tests in children and 23% in adults were positive for coriander and other members of the family Apiaceae, including<span> </span>caraway,<span> </span>fennel, and<span> </span>celery.<sup id="cite_ref-aip_30-1" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>The allergic symptoms may be minor or life-threatening.</p>
MHS 117 (2g)
Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)

Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)  - 2

Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)

Prijs € 1,65 SKU: MHS 129
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 240 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Cumin (/ˈkjuːmᵻn/ or UK /ˈkʌmᵻn/, US /ˈkuːmᵻn/), sometimes spelled cummin, (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to India.</p> <p>Its seeds (each one contained within a fruit, which is dried) are used in the cuisines of many different cultures, in both whole and ground form. It also has many uses as a traditional medicinal plant.</p> <p>Cumin is the dried seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum, a member of the parsley family. The cumin plant grows to 30–50 cm (12–20 in) tall and is harvested by hand. It is an annual herbaceous plant, with a slender, glabrous, branched stem that is 20–30 cm (8–12 in) tall and has a diameter of 3–5 cm (1 1⁄4–2 in).[9] Each branch has two to three sub-branches. All the branches attain the same height, therefore the plant has a uniform canopy.[9] The stem is coloured grey or dark green. The leaves are 5–10 cm (2–4 in) long, pinnate or bipinnate, with thread-like leaflets. The flowers are small, white or pink, and borne in umbels. Each umbel has five to seven umbellts.[9] The fruit is a lateral fusiform or ovoid achene 4–5 mm (1⁄6–1⁄5 in) long, containing two mericarps with a single seed.[9] Cumin seeds have eight ridges with oil canals.[9] They resemble caraway seeds, being oblong in shape, longitudinally ridged, and yellow-brown in colour, like other members of the Umbelliferae family such as caraway, parsley, and dill.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The English "cumin" is derived from the Old English, from Latin cuminum,[3] which is the Latinisation of the Greek κύμινον (kyminon),[4] cognate with Hebrew כמון (kammon) and Arabic كمون (kammūn).[5] The earliest attested form of the word in Greek is the Mycenaean.</p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Sowing Instructions</span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Needs Light to germinate!</strong></span> Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap">&nbsp;</td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em></strong></span></p> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><em></em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp;</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 129 (1g)
Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)  - 2