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Varieties from Greece

Giant Beefsteak Greek Tomato Seeds PREVEZA

Giant Beefsteak Greek...

Ціна 2,25 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Beefsteak Greek Tomato Seeds PREVEZA</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The huge fruits that reach a weight of over 1 kg, and with it more and excellent taste, either in salads or cooked meals. Greece variety of tomatoes from the district Elpida that there called giant Pervez. Indeed, from a few dozen fruits none of them were less than 500 grams. The plants are robust and highly prolific and fruit red and slightly wrinkled.</p>
VT 156 (10 S)
Giant Beefsteak Greek Tomato Seeds PREVEZA
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ARGITIKO Greek Melon Seeds

ARGITIKO Greek Melon Seeds

Ціна 2,30 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>ARGITIKO GREEK MELON SEEDS</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Fruit: weight 3-4 kg, oval with a very sweet taste and strong scent. The color of the fruit is yellow. This strange looking melon is an Argitiko Peponi. It is obvious to everyone but us that this fruit comes from Argos, people seem surprised that we aren't familiar with this melon. They say to us very slowly "Argitiko, from Argos". Argos is a city in the Northern Peloponnese, and has a reputation for being extremely fertile. I have been told that they have a great market day in the city that is not to be missed if you like fresh produce. Argos has been continuously inhabited for more than 7000 years, since the days of Ancient Greece.</p> <p>Enough with your Greek history lesson for the day.</p> <p>What you need to know is that if you encounter an Argitiko Peponi you should buy one, because they taste fantastic. They look like a cantaloupe when you cut them open, but they are as sweet as candy with some floral overtones. They have a wonderful scent, even if they are sitting uncut in your kitchen.</p> </body> </html>
V166
ARGITIKO Greek Melon Seeds
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Golden Head or Thrace Melon Seeds – Best Greek Melon 1.55 - 1

Golden Head or Thrace Melon...

Ціна 1,55 €
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Golden Head or Thrace Melon Seeds – Best Greek Melon</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Variety that is grown in the border region of Evros for centuries, only ecologically without fertilizers, pesticides etc. variety "Golden Head" or Thrace melon is unique in appearance and taste.</p> <p>This plant produces beautiful late relatively large fruits, weighing up to 3 kg, globular fruit, have the characteristic "nose". The wrinkled yellow rind with green-black stripes - points, the flesh is white and very sweet and aromatic.</p> <h2><strong>This is the best Greek melon!</strong></h2> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 166 (10 S)
Golden Head or Thrace Melon Seeds – Best Greek Melon 1.55 - 1
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Разнообразие из Греции
Fenugreek Seeds (Trigonella foenum-graecum) 1.55 - 2

Fenugreek Seeds (Trigonella...

Ціна 1,15 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Fenugreek Seeds (Trigonella foenum-graecum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 140 (2 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is an annual plant in the family Fabaceae, with leaves consisting of three small obovate to oblong leaflets. It is cultivated worldwide as a semiarid crop, and its seeds are a common ingredient in dishes from South Asia.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Fenugreek is used as an herb (dried or fresh leaves), spice (seeds), and vegetable (fresh leaves, sprouts, and microgreens). Sotolon is the chemical responsible for fenugreek's distinctive sweet smell. Cuboid-shaped, yellow- to amber-colored fenugreek seeds are frequently encountered in the cuisines of the Indian subcontinent, used both whole and powdered in the preparation of pickles, vegetable dishes, daals, and spice mixes such as panch phoron and sambar powder. They are often roasted to reduce bitterness and enhance flavor.</p> <p><strong>Cooking</strong></p> <p>Fresh fenugreek leaves are an ingredient in some Indian curries. Sprouted seeds and microgreens are used in salads. When harvested as microgreens, fenugreek is known as samudra methi in Maharashtra, especially in and around Mumbai, where it is often grown near the sea in the sandy tracts, hence the name samudra, "ocean" in Sanskrit. Samudra methi is also grown in dry river beds in the Gangetic plains. When sold as a vegetable in India, the young plants are harvested with their roots still attached and sold in small bundles in the markets and bazaars. Any remaining soil is washed off to extend their shelf life.</p> <p>In Turkish cuisine, fenugreek seeds are used for making a paste known as çemen. Cumin, black pepper, and other spices are added into it, especially to make pastırma.</p> <p>In Persian cuisine, fenugreek leaves are called "شنبلیله" (shanbalile). They are the key ingredient and one of several greens incorporated into ghormeh sabzi and eshkeneh, often said to be the Iranian national dishes.</p> <p>In Egyptian cuisine, peasants in Upper Egypt add fenugreek seeds and maize to their pita bread to produce aish merahrah, a staple of their diet.</p> <p>Fenugreek is used in Eritrean and Ethiopian cuisine. The word for fenugreek in Amharic is abesh (or abish), and the seed is used in Ethiopia as a natural herbal medicine in the treatment of diabetes.</p> <p>Yemenite Jews following the interpretation of Rabbi Shelomo Yitzchak (Rashi) believe fenugreek, which they call hilbeh, hilba, helba, or halba "חילבה", to be the Talmudic rubia "רוביא". When the seed kernels are ground and mixed with water they greatly expand; hot spices, turmeric and lemon juice are added to produce a frothy relish eaten with a sop. The relish is also called hilbeh;[11] it is reminiscent of curry. It is eaten daily and ceremonially during the meal of the first and/or second night of the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional profile</strong></p> <p>Per 100 g, fenugreek leaves provide 210 kilojoules (49 kcal) and contain 89% water, 6% carbohydrates, 4% protein and less than 1% fat, with calcium at 40% of the Daily Value (DV, table).</p> <p>Fenugreek seeds (per 100 g) are rich sources of protein (46% of DV), dietary fiber (98% DV), B vitamins, iron (186% DV) and several other dietary minerals.</p> <p><strong>Safety</strong></p> <p>Fenugreek sprouts, cultivated from a single specific batch of seeds imported from Egypt into Germany in 2009, were implicated as the source of the 2011 outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Germany and France. Identification of a common producer and a single batch of fenugreek seeds supports the epidemiologic evidence implicating them as the source of the outbreaks.</p> <p>Some people are allergic to fenugreek, and people who have peanut allergy and chickpea allergy may have a reaction to fenugreek.</p> <p>Fenugreek seeds can cause diarrhea, dyspepsia, abdominal distention, and flatulence.</p> <p>There is a risk of hypoglycemia particularly in people with diabetes; it may also interfere with the activity of anti-diabetic drugs.</p> <p>Because of the high content of coumarin-like compounds in fenugreek, it may interfere with the activity and dosing of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs.</p> <p>It causes birth defects in animals and there are reports that it also causes birth defects in humans, and that it can pass through the placenta; it also appears to negatively affect male fertility, female fertility, and the ability of an embryo in animals and humans.</p> <p><strong>Traditional medicine</strong></p> <p>In traditional medicine, fenugreek is thought to promote digestion, induce labor, and reduce blood sugar levels in diabetics, although the evidence for these effects is lacking.</p> <p><strong>Research</strong></p> <p>Constituents of fenugreek seeds include flavonoids, alkaloids, coumarins, vitamins and saponins; the most prevalent alkaloid is trigonelline and coumarins include cinnamic acid and scopoletin.</p> <p>A 2016 meta-analysis combining the results of 12 small studies, of which only three were high quality, found that fenugreek may reduce some biomarkers in people with diabetes and with pre-diabetic conditions, but that better quality research would be required in order to draw conclusions.</p> <p>As of 2016, there was no high-quality evidence for whether fenugreek is safe and effective to relieve dysmenorrhea.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Fenugreek is believed to have been brought into cultivation in the Near East. While Zohary and Hopf are uncertain which wild strain of the genus Trigonella gave rise to domesticated fenugreek, charred fenugreek seeds have been recovered from Tell Halal, Iraq, (carbon dated to 4000 BC) and Bronze Age levels of Lachish and desiccated seeds from the tomb of Tutankhamen. Cato the Elder lists fenugreek with clover and vetch as crops grown to feed cattle. In one first-century A.D. recipe, the Romans flavored wine with fenugreek. In the 1st century AD, in Galilee, it was grown as a food staple, as Josephus mentions it in his book, the Wars of the Jews. A compendium of Jewish oral law known as the Mishnah (compiled in the 2nd century) mentions the plant under its Hebrew name, tiltan.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The English name derives via Middle French fenugrec from Latin faenugraecum, faenum Greacum meaning "Greek hay".</p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>Major fenugreek-producing countries are Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Iran, Nepal, Bangladesh, Argentina, Egypt, France, Spain, Turkey, and Morocco. The largest producer is India. Fenugreek production in India is concentrated in the states of Rajasthan, Gujarat, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Haryana, and Punjab. Rajasthan accounts for over 80% of India's output.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 64 (2g)
Fenugreek Seeds (Trigonella foenum-graecum) 1.55 - 2
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Caper bush, Flinders Rose Seeds (Capparis spinosa) 1.95 - 11

Caper bush, Flinders Rose...

Ціна 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Caper bush, Flinders Rose Seeds (Capparis spinosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Capparis spinosa, the caper bush, also called Flinders rose, is a perennial plant that bears rounded, fleshy leaves and large white to pinkish-white flowers.</p> <p><strong>The plant is best known for the edible flower buds (capers), often used as a seasoning, and the fruit (caper berries), both of which are usually consumed pickled.</strong> Other species of Capparis are also picked along with C. spinosa for their buds or fruits. Other parts of Capparis plants are used in the manufacture of medicines and cosmetics.</p> <p>Capparis spinosa is found in the wild in the Mediterranean, East Africa, Madagascar, South-Western and Central Asia, the Himalayas, the Pacific Islands, Indomalaya, and Australia.[6] It is present in almost all the circum-Mediterranean countries, and is included in the flora of most of them, but whether it is indigenous to this region is uncertain. Although the flora of the Mediterranean region has considerable endemism, the caper bush could have originated in the tropics, and later been naturalized to the Mediterranean basin.</p> <p>The taxonomic status of the species is controversial and unsettled. Species within the genus Capparis are highly variable, and interspecific hybrids have been common throughout the evolutionary history of the genus. As a result, some authors have considered C. spinosa to be composed of multiple distinct species, others that the taxon is a single species with multiple varieties or subspecies, or that the taxon C. spinosa is a hybrid between C. orientalis and C. sicula.</p> <p><strong>Plant</strong></p> <p>The shrubby plant is many-branched, with alternate leaves, thick and shiny, round to ovate. The flowers are complete, sweetly fragrant, and showy, with four sepals and four white to pinkish-white petals, and many long violet-colored stamens, and a single stigma usually rising well above the stamens.</p> <p><strong>Culinary uses</strong></p> <p>The salted and pickled caper bud (called simply a caper) is often used as a seasoning or garnish. Capers are a common ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine, especially Cypriot, Italian, Aeolian and Maltese. The mature fruit of the caper shrub are prepared similarly and marketed as caper berries.</p> <p>The buds, when ready to pick, are a dark olive green and about the size of a fresh kernel of corn (Zea mays). They are picked, then pickled in salt, or a salt and vinegar solution, and drained. Intense flavor is developed as mustard oil (glucocapparin) is released from each caper bud. This enzymatic reaction leads to the formation of rutin, often seen as crystallized white spots on the surfaces of individual caper buds.</p> <p>Capers are a distinctive ingredient in Italian cuisine, especially in Sicilian, Aeolian and southern Italian cooking. They are commonly used in salads, pasta salads, meat dishes, and pasta sauces. Examples of uses in Italian cuisine are chicken piccata and spaghetti alla puttanesca.</p> <p>Capers are known for being one of the ingredients of tartar sauce. They are often served with cold smoked salmon or cured salmon dishes (especially lox and cream cheese). Capers and caper berries are sometimes substituted for olives to garnish a martini.</p> <p>Capers are categorized and sold by their size, defined as follows, with the smallest sizes being the most desirable: non-pareil (up to 7 mm), surfines (7–8 mm), capucines (8–9 mm), capotes (9–11 mm), fines (11–13 mm), and grusas (14+ mm). If the caper bud is not picked, it flowers and produces a caper berry. The fruit can be pickled and then served as a Greek mezze.</p> <p>Caper leaves, which are hard to find outside of Greece or Cyprus, are used particularly in salads and fish dishes. They are pickled or boiled and preserved in jars with brine—like caper buds.</p> <p>Dried caper leaves are also used as a substitute for rennet in the manufacturing of high-quality cheese.</p> <p><strong>Nutrition</strong></p> <p>Canned, pickled capers are 84% water, 5% carbohydrates, 2% protein, and 1% fat (table).</p> <p>Preserved capers are often particularly high in sodium content. In a typical serving of 28 grams (one ounce), capers supply 6 calories and 35% of the Daily Value (DV) for sodium, with no other nutrients in significant content. In a 100 gram amount, the sodium content is 2960 mg or 197% DV, with vitamin K (23% DV), iron (13% DV), and riboflavin (12% DV) also having appreciable levels (table).</p> <p><strong>Environmental requirements</strong></p> <p>The caper bush requires a semiarid or arid climate.</p> <p>The caper bush has developed a series of mechanisms that reduce the impact of high radiation levels, high daily temperature, and insufficient soil water during its growing period.</p> <p>The caper bush has a curious reaction to sudden increases in humidity; it forms wart-like pock marks across the leaf surface. This is apparently harmless, as the plant quickly adjusts to the new conditions and produces unaffected leaves.</p> <p>It also shows characteristics of a plant adapted to poor soils. This shrub has a high root/shoot ratio and the presence of mycorrhizae serves to maximize the uptake of minerals in poor soils. Different nitrogen-fixing bacterial strains have been isolated from the caper bush rhizosphere, playing a role in maintaining high reserves of that growth-limiting element.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The caper bush has been introduced as a specialized culture in some European countries in the last four decades. The economic importance of the caper plant led to a significant increase in both the area under cultivation and production levels during the late 1980s. The main production areas are in harsh environments found in Morocco, the southeastern Iberian Peninsula, Turkey, and the Italian islands of Pantelleria and Aeolian Islands, especially Salina. This species has developed special mechanisms to survive in the Mediterranean conditions, and introduction in semiarid lands may help to prevent the disruption of the equilibrium of those fragile ecosystems.</p> <p>A harvest duration of at least three months is necessary for profitability.</p> <p>Intense daylight and a long growing period are necessary to secure high yields. The caper bush can withstand temperatures over 40 °C in summer, but it is sensitive to frost during its vegetative period. A caper bush is able to survive low temperatures in the form of stump, as happens in the foothills of the Alps. Caper plants are found even 3,500 m above sea level in Ladakh, though they are usually grown at lower altitudes. Some Italian and Argentine plantings can withstand strong winds without problems, due to caper bush decumbent architecture and the coriaceous consistency of the leaves in some populations.</p> <p>Scientists can use the known distributions of each species to identify the origin of commercially prepared capers.</p> <p>The caper bush is a rupicolous species.[20] It is widespread on rocky areas and is grown on different soil associations, including alfisols, regosols, and lithosols. In different Himalayan locations, C. spinosa tolerates both silty clay and sandy, rocky, or gravelly surface soils, with less than 1% organic matter. It grows on bare rocks, crevices, cracks, and sand dunes in Pakistan, in dry calcareous escarpments of the Adriatic region, in dry coastal ecosystems of Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia, in transitional zones between the littoral salt marsh and the coastal deserts of the Asian Red Sea coast, in the rocky arid bottoms of the Jordan valley, in calcareous sandstone cliffs at Ramat Aviv, Israel, and in central west and northwest coastal dunes of Australia. It grows spontaneously in wall joints of antique Roman fortresses, on the Western Wall of Jerusalem's Temple Mount, and on the ramparts of the castle of Santa Bárbara (Alicante, Spain). Clinging caper plants are dominant on the medieval limestone-made ramparts of Alcudia and the bastions of Palma (Majorca, Spain). This aggressive pioneering has brought about serious problems for the protection of monuments.</p> <p><strong>Propagation</strong></p> <p>Capers can be grown easily from fresh seeds gathered from ripe fruit and planted into well-drained seed-raising mix. Seedlings appear in two to four weeks. Old, stored seeds enter a state of dormancy and require cold stratification to germinate. The viable embryos germinate within three to four days after partial removal of the lignified seed coats.[21] The seed coats and the mucilage surrounding the seeds may be ecological adaptations to avoid water loss and conserve seed viability during the dry season.</p> <p>Use of stem cuttings avoids high variability in terms of production and quality. Nevertheless, plants grown from cuttings are more susceptible to drought during the first years after planting. The caper bush is a difficult-to-root woody species, and successful propagation requires careful consideration of biotypes and seasonal and environmental parameters. Rootings up to 55% are possible when using one-year-old wood, depending on cutting harvest time and substrate used. Propagation from stem cuttings is the standard method for growing ‘Mallorquina’ and ‘Italiana’ in Spain, and ‘Nocella’ in the Aolian Islands, esp. Salina. Hardwood cuttings vary in length from 15 to 50 cm and diameter of the cuttings may range from 1.0 to 2.5 cm. Another possibility is to collect stems during February through the beginning of March, treat them with captan or captafol and stratify them outdoors or in a chamber at 3–4 °C, covered with sand or plastic. Moisture content and drainage should be carefully monitored and maintained until planting. Using semihardwood cuttings, collected and planted during August and September, low survival rates (under 30%) have been achieved. Softwood cuttings are prepared in April from 25- to 30-day shoots. Each cutting should contain at least two nodes and be six to 10 cm long. Basal or subterminal cuttings are more successful than terminal ones. Then, cuttings are planted in a greenhouse under a mist system with bottom heat; 150 to 200 cuttings/m2 may be planted.</p> <p><strong>Orchard establishment</strong></p> <p>Mean annual temperatures in areas under cultivation are over 14 °C and rainfall varies from 200 mm/year in Spain to 460 mm/year in Pantelleria and 680 mm/year in Salina. In Pantelleria, it rains only 35 mm from May through August, and 84 mm in Salina, the Aeolian Islands. A rainy spring and a hot dry summer are considered advantageous.[22] This drought-tolerant perennial plant is used for landscaping and reducing erosion along highways, steep rocky slopes, sand dunes or fragile semiarid ecosystems.</p> <p>Caper plantings over 25 to 30 years old are still productive.[23] Thus, physical properties of the soil (texture and depth) are particularly important. Caper bushes can develop extensive root systems and grow best on deep, nonstratified, medium-textured, loamy soils. Mouldboard plowing and harrowing are usual practices prior to caper plant establishment. Soil-profile modification practices, such as deep plowing operating 0.6 to 1 m, can ameliorate some restrictions. In Pantelleria, digging backhoe pits for each shrub was found to be the most effective means of cultivating caper in rocky soils. Two planting designs are used, the square/rectangle and the hedgerow system. Spacing is determined by the vigour of the biotype, fertility of the soil, equipment used and the irrigation method, if any. Bush spacing of 2.5 × 2.5 m or 2.5 × 2 m is common in Pantelleria. In Salina, the Aeolian Islands, 3 × 3 m is satisfactory for ‘Nocella’. In Spain, 4 × 4 m or 5 × 5 m is satisfactory for ‘Mallorquina’. Spacing of 2.0 to 2.5 m is appropriate if C. spinosa is used to control soil erosion on slopes.</p> <p><strong>Polyphenols</strong></p> <p>Canned capers contain polyphenols, including the flavonoids quercetin (173 mg per 100 g) and kaempferol (131 mg per 100 g), as well as anthocyanins.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The caper was used in ancient Greece as a carminative. It is represented in archaeological levels in the form of carbonised seeds and rarely as flower buds and fruits from archaic and Classical antiquity contexts. Athenaeus in Deipnosophistae pays a lot of attention to the caper, as do Pliny (NH XIX, XLVIII.163) and Theophrastus.</p> <p>Etymologically, the caper and its relatives in several European tongues can be traced back to Classical Latin capparis, “caper”, in turn borrowed from the Greek κάππαρις, kápparis, whose origin (as that of the plant) is unknown but is probably Asian. Another theory links kápparis to the name of the island of Cyprus (Κύπρος, Kýpros), where capers grow abundantly.</p> <p>In Biblical times, the caper berry was apparently supposed to have aphrodisiac properties;[29] the Hebrew word aviyyonah (אֲבִיּוֹנָה) for caperberry is closely linked to the Hebrew root אבה (avah), meaning "desire".[30] The word occurs once in the Bible, in the book of Ecclesiastes, at verse 12:5.</p> <p>The King James Version translates on the basis of the Hebrew root (and perhaps the metaphorical meaning):[31]</p> <p>...the grasshopper shall be a burden,</p> <p>and desire shall fail. (12:5 KJV)</p> <p>The medieval Jewish commentator Rashi also gives a similar gloss (12:5 JPR). However, ancient translations, including the Septuagint, Vulgate, Peshitta and Aquila, render the word more concretely as κάππαρις, "caper berry".[29] Thus in the words of one modern idiomatic translation (2004),</p> <p>...the grasshopper loses its spring,</p> <p>and the caper berry has no effect; (12:5 HCSB)</p> <p>Of other modern versions, the NIV goes for "desire" (12:5 NIV), while the NASB has "caper-berry" (12:5 NASB), as did the 1917 Jewish Publication Society version (12:5 JPS).</p> <p>The berries (abiyyonot) were eaten, as appears from their liability to tithes and to the restrictions of the 'Orlah. They are carefully distinguished in the Mishnah and the Talmud from the caper leaves, alin, shoots, temarot,[32] and the caper buds, capperisin (note the similarity "caper"isin to "caper");[33] all of which were eaten as seen from the blessing requirement, and declared to be the fruit of the ẓalef or caper plant.</p> <p>Talmud Bavli, Gemara Berachot, page 36 A&amp;B, discusses the eating of caper sepals versus caper berries, both inside the land of Israel, outside the land of Israel, and in Syria.</p>
P 376
Caper bush, Flinders Rose Seeds (Capparis spinosa) 1.95 - 11
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Florinis Greece Sweet...

Florinis Greece Sweet...

Ціна 1,75 €
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>"Florinis" Greece Sweet pepper Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Greece Traditional sweet red peppers (known in Greece as "Florinis"), an excellent sweet taste! Variety florin, length 23 - 28 cm and weight 200 g per fruit. In Greece, this pepper is prepared in various ways, from filling to salad and preservation. It's free to say that the table without this favorite pepper in Greek is unthinkable. Plants are fertile and highly resistant to disease.</p> <h2 class="elementor-heading-title elementor-size-default"><strong>Chalkidiki Olives stuffed with Florina pepper</strong></h2> <p><span>Strips of red fleshy sweet pepper, cut by hand to be filled in Chalkidiki green olives. It is the perfect dish for lovers of mild but slightly spicy, sweet and savory flavors. All these flavors together are present in olive of Chalkidiki, stuffed with red sweet pepper and can accompany each menu.</span></p> <h3><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h3> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Florina pepper</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(Greek:<span>&nbsp;</span><span lang="el" xml:lang="el">πιπεριά Φλωρίνης</span>) is a<span>&nbsp;</span>pepper<span>&nbsp;</span>cultivated in the northern Greek region of<span>&nbsp;</span>Western Macedonia<span>&nbsp;</span>and specifically in the wider area of<span>&nbsp;</span>Florina; for which it is named. It has a deep red color and is shaped like a cow's horn. Initially, the pepper has a green color,<span>&nbsp;</span>ripening<span>&nbsp;</span>into red, after the<span>&nbsp;</span>15th of August. The red pepper is known in<span>&nbsp;</span>Greece<span>&nbsp;</span>for its rich sweet flavor, used in various Greek dishes and is exported in various canned forms abroad, usually hand-stripped, keeping the natural scents of pepper and topped with extra virgin olive oil, salt, and vinegar.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>The seed was brought from<span>&nbsp;</span>Brazil<span>&nbsp;</span>to<span>&nbsp;</span>Western Macedonia<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>Greece<span>&nbsp;</span>in the 17th century and cultivated by the local<span>&nbsp;</span>Macedonian Greeks<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>Florina,<span>&nbsp;</span>Prespes,<span>&nbsp;</span>Veroia,<span>&nbsp;</span>Aridaia, and<span>&nbsp;</span>Kozani<span>&nbsp;</span>but only in Florina, its cultivation was successful, where it adapted to the Greek Macedonian climate and soil, and eventually, the other regions stopped cultivating the pepper, leaving Florina as its sole producer.<sup id="cite_ref-kathimerini_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The pepper belongs to the<span>&nbsp;</span>capsicum<span>&nbsp;</span>genus of the nightshade family<span>&nbsp;</span>Solanaceae.<sup id="cite_ref-test2_3-0" class="reference">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Florina's red peppers were awarded the recognition of<span>&nbsp;</span>Protected Designation of Origin<span>&nbsp;</span>in 1994 by the<span>&nbsp;</span>World Trade Organization<span>&nbsp;</span>(WTO).<sup id="cite_ref-test14_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Every year during the last days of August, in a small local village in<span>&nbsp;</span>Aetos, Florina<span>&nbsp;</span>a feast of peppers is held, including celebrations with music bands and cooked recipes, based on peppers which are offered to all the guests.<sup id="cite_ref-test4_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>High productivity and adaptation of the plant can be achieved in efficient draining soils, full sunny locations and low winds for the protection of its branch and root sensitivity.<sup id="cite_ref-test12_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The most convenient temperatures for its growth are between 20° to 26°<span>&nbsp;</span>Celsius<span>&nbsp;</span>during the midday and 14° to 16° Celsius during the night.<sup id="cite_ref-test2_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Their harvest takes up to 18 weeks,<span>&nbsp;</span>ripening<span>&nbsp;</span>to maturity after mid-August.<sup id="cite_ref-kathimerini_1-2" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>A good quality, red pepper of Florina should be bright in color, thick, firm and sweet flavored. Its consumption should be avoided with the appearance of dullness, cracks or deterioration, which are factors of the<span>&nbsp;</span>vegetable<span>&nbsp;</span>reduction in quality.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cooking_and_recipes">Cooking and recipes</span></h2> <p>The red peppers of Florina are usually<span>&nbsp;</span>roasted<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>stuffed<span>&nbsp;</span>with different combinations of<span>&nbsp;</span>foods, as<span>&nbsp;</span>rice,<span>&nbsp;</span>meat,<span>&nbsp;</span>shrimps<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>feta cheese.<sup id="cite_ref-macsaveur_8-0" class="reference">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>These<span>&nbsp;</span>sweet peppers<span>&nbsp;</span>are used in<span>&nbsp;</span>sauces,<span>&nbsp;</span>salads,<span>&nbsp;</span>pasta, meat recipes or mashed, creating a<span>&nbsp;</span>pâté<span>&nbsp;</span>with traditional recipes. They can also be<span>&nbsp;</span>dried,<span>&nbsp;</span>canned,<span>&nbsp;</span>frozen<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>pickled, usually<span>&nbsp;</span>garnishing<span>&nbsp;</span>Greek salads.<span>&nbsp;</span>They can be roasted, sliced and served as an appetizer, by adding<span>&nbsp;</span>olive oil,<span>&nbsp;</span>garlic<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>sea salt.<span>&nbsp;</span>A well-known traditional recipe in<span>&nbsp;</span>Greece<span>&nbsp;</span>with stuffed peppers is<span>&nbsp;</span>Gemista.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
P 379 (10 S)
Florinis Greece Sweet pepper Seeds
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PETROUSA DRAMA Hydroponic...

PETROUSA DRAMA Hydroponic...

Ціна 1,35 €
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>PETROUSA DRAMA Hydroponic Beef Tomato Seed</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 15 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>THE BEST HYDROPONIC TOMATO VARIETY FROM GREECE!</strong></p> <h2><em><span>HOW TO GROW HYDROPONIC TOMATOES</span></em></h2> <p>Hydroponic tomatoes are grown in a nutrient solution rather than soil, although they are typically placed in a non-soil material that can support their roots and hold the nutrients. Growing tomatoes hydroponically allows the grower to raise them in a controlled environment with less chance of disease, faster growth, and greater fruit yield. However, hydroponic gardening is much more labor-intensive, and sometimes more expensive, than ordinary tomato planting, especially if you have not set up or run a hydroponics system before.</p> <p>1</p> <p>Decide which type of system to use. There are several varieties of hydroponic systems, and tomatoes can grow well in any of them. The instructions in this section will teach you how to construct an ebb and flow system, which is relatively cheap and easy to build.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Alternatives:</p> <p>Deep water culture: simple system for cherry tomatoes and other small plants.[1]</p> <p>Multi flow: a larger version of the ebb and flow that relies on gravity. Difficult to build, but supports more plants.</p> <p>Nutrient film technique (NFT): Suspends the plants with roots brushing against slope of trickling nutrients. Slightly more finicky and expensive, but preferred by some commercial growers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Note: Hydroponics stores and home improvement stores may sell a hydroponics kit which includes everything you need to set up your system. Alternatively, you can purchase each component separately, or even find some of them around your house. Clean secondhand or previously used components thoroughly before building the hydroponics system.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>2</p> <p>Find a suitable location. Hydroponics systems are only suitable for indoor or greenhouse environments. They require precise control to function properly, so they should be set up somewhere closed off from other rooms and from the outside. This allows you to set the temperature and humidity to accurate levels needed for best growth.</p> <p>It is possible to grow hydroponics using natural light, but keep the system under a glass or polyethylene covering such as a greenhouse roof, not open to the air.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>3</p> <p>Fill a large, plastic container with water to use as a reservoir. Use a plastic container that does not let in any light to prevent the growth of algae. The larger this reservoir, the more stable and successful your hydroponics system will be. At minimum, each small tomato plant (such as cherry tomato plants) will require 1/2 gallons (1.9 liters) of water, while most, somewhat larger tomato plants will require 1 gallon (3.8L) each. However, many factors can cause the tomato plants to use water faster, so it is recommended that you use a container that can hold double the minimum amount of water.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>[2]</p> <p>You may use a plastic bucket or trash can for this purpose. Use a brand-new one to prevent any contamination of the system, or at least a lightly-used one thoroughly scrubbed with soapy water and rinsed.</p> <p>Collected rainwater may be better suited for hydroponics than tap water, especially if your tap water is especially "hard" with high mineral content.[3]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>4</p> <p>Fix a tray in place above the reservoir. This "ebb and flow tray" will support your tomato plants, and will be periodically flooded with nutrients and water that the tomato roots will absorb. It must be sturdy enough to hold up your plants (or be placed atop additional support), and placed higher than your reservoir to allow excess water to drain down into it. These are typically built of plastics, not metal, to avoid corrosion that could affect the plants and wear out the tray.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>5</p> <p>Install a water pump inside the reservoir. You can purchase a water pump at a hydroponics store, or use a fountain pump found at home improvement stores. Many pumps will have a chart listing the water flow at different heights. You may use this to find a pump strong enough to send water from the reservoir to the tray containing the plants. The best course of action, however, may be to pick a powerful, adjustable pump and experiment with the settings once you have your system set up.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>6</p> <p>Install fill tubing between the reservoir and the tray. Using 1/2 inch (1.25 cm) PVC tubing, or the type of tubing that came in your hydroponics kit, attach one length of tubing between the water pump and the tray, so the tray can be flooded to the height of the tomato plant roots.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>7</p> <p>Install an overflow fitting leading back to the reservoir. Attach a second length of PVC tubing to the tray with an overflow fitting, located at a height near the top of the roots, below where the tomato plant stems will be. When the water reaches this level, it will drain back through this tube and into the reservoir.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>8</p> <p>Attach a timer to the water pump. A simple timer intended for light fixtures can be used to power the water pump at regular intervals. This needs to be adjustable so you can increase or decrease the amount of nutrients delivered depending on the plants' stage of life.</p> <p>A heavy duty 15-amp timer with waterproof cover is recommended.[4]</p> <p>Any water pump should have a way to attach a timer, if it doesn't come with one already, but the exact instructions vary by model. Ask the manufacturer if you are having trouble with this step.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>9</p> <p>Test the system. Turn on the water pump and see where the water goes. If a stream of water fails to reach the tray, or if excess water spills over the edges of the tray, you may need to adjust the settings of your water pump. Once you have the water set to the correct strength, check the timer to see if it sets the pump going at the specified times.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>READ MORE WIT PICTURES HERE:</strong></p> <p><span><a href="http://www.wikihow.com/Grow-Hydroponic-Tomatoes" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span><strong>http://www.wikihow.com/Grow-Hydroponic-Tomatoes</strong></span></a></span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 89 (15 S)
PETROUSA DRAMA Hydroponic Beef Tomato Seed
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Ця рослина має гігантські плоди
Greek Traditional Giant Melon Kalambaka Seeds

Greek Traditional Giant...

Ціна 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Greek Traditional Giant Melon Kalambaka Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This is an old traditional variety of the Greek melon, which gets the name from the town of Kalambaka from which originates. The fruits of this variety have a weight of 8 to 10 kilograms and have a length of 60 cm and more. The bark of the fruit is orange in color, and the flesh is also orange. It has an excellent and sweet aroma and a unique and intense smell.</p> <p>Truly one of the most beautiful varieties of melon which we In latest years tried!</p>
V 169
Greek Traditional Giant Melon Kalambaka Seeds
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Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI  - 4

Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI

Ціна 3,40 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Many people complain that eggplants are bitter, well guess what? The Greek variety Tsakoniki is not, it is actually mild, almost sweet. This eggplant is from the town of Leonidio in Peloponissos, it is long with white stripes and it has PDO status, which means that it must come from Leonidio to be called Tsakoniki.</p> <p>When eggplant season comes around there are all sorts of traditional Greek recipes to choose from.</p> <p>The eggplant is a decadent vegetable; when cooked it literally melts in your mouth and caramelizes giving it a sweet taste. Although Greeks have plenty of eggplant recipes, the Mediterranean in general is known for its love of eggplants and there is an abundance of  traditional recipes to choose from.</p> <p>Nutritionally, eggplants are a fantastic vegetable to include in your diet, here’s why: Eggplants are a source of soluble fiber, this type of fiber slows down the emptying of your stomach making you feel full longer and that can help you eat less if your are trying to lose weight. But one of the most important functions is that this fiber may lower the levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol in your blood.</p> <p>Eggplants also contain several substances that can protect from chronic disease. One of them is chlorogenic acid, don’t worry about pronouncing it correctly, all you need to know is that this substance is an antioxidant and it appears to control blood sugar levels. Anthocyanin is another a substance present in these vegetables, it is responsible for the purple color and it also has antioxidant properties, studies show that it may offer protection from cancer.</p>
P 290
Greek Eggplant Seeds TSAKONIKI  - 4
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Greece Melon - Green Banana Seeds

Greece Melon - Green Banana...

Ціна 1,95 €
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>GREECE MELON - GREEN BANANA SEEDS</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Very interesting ancient Greek variety of melon in appearance and taste. The fruits are heavy 4-5 kilos. The bark is green and the orange flesh. It has a strong and intense smell, and the taste is specific and very sweet. In Greece, this melon called banana melons. The older man (about 80 years), from which we purchased this variety, talked that remembers that his grandfather grew this variety when he had some 9-10 years.</p> <p>We thank <strong>Sava’s</strong> who was very helpful to us in the translation and in the search for ancient Greek varieties .</p>
V 168
Greece Melon - Green Banana Seeds
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Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1

Become our seed supplier

Ціна 0,00 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Become our seed supplier</strong></h2> <h2><strong>What does it take to become our seed supplier?</strong></h2> <p>In order to become our supplier, you need to have a video and pictures of the fruits of the plants you offer us, with your personal details and a date on paper that will be clearly visible (with your name and email address you use for PayPal).</p> <p>If it is a vegetable (tomato, pepper, cucumber ...) you need to know the exact name of the variety, because if you use any other name and we cannot find the information on the internet, then we are not interested in those seeds.</p> <p>You will need to send us a smaller amount of seed (20) so that we can perform seed germination testing. After that, we can arrange a further purchase of the seed from you.</p> <p>We make payments exclusively through PayPal (there is no other payment option).</p> </body> </html>
Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1
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15.000 Seeds Wild - Greek Oregano (Origanum Vulgare) 15 - 3

15.000 Seeds Wild Greek...

Ціна 10,90 €
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>15.000 Seeds Wild - Greek Oregano (Origanum Vulgare)</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 15.000 (4g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Compared to other varieties of oregano, there really is nothing remarkable about Greek oregano from an ornamental viewpoint. It simply has hairy dark green leaves with small white flowers. However, whatever aesthetic shortcomings this Mediterranean native may have, it compensates for in culinary value.</p> <p>You may not be aware of this Greek oregano info, but while there are many varieties of oregano, Greek oregano is considered the “true oregano” and is typically the oregano that graces the standard supermarket spice rack. And, if you are curious about Greek oregano uses, it is savored for its strong aroma and spicy intense flavor and is prominently used in Greek, Italian or Spanish cuisine in homemade pizzas, tomato sauces, soups and more.</p> <p>Greek oregano is also valued beyond the kitchen by those who consider it to have medicinal properties.</p> <p>How to Grow Greek Oregano</p> <p>Greek oregano, which grows up to 24 inches (61 cm.) tall and 18 inches (46 cm.) wide, can be grown from seed. If growing Greek oregano as a groundcover or edger, growing from seed is a viable option. Greek oregano plants tend to get woody over time and after about 5 years the leaves tend to lose their flavor and texture.</p> <p>Greek oregano (USDA planting zones 5-9) is a vigorous and hardy perennial that can thrive in dry soil and hot temperatures once established. And, as if you needed yet another reason to love this oregano, it’s bee-friendly and makes a great addition to a pollinator garden.</p> <p>Plantings (seed or plants) should be spaced at least 12 inches (30 cm.) apart in well-draining, slightly alkaline soil in a location that receives full sun for optimum growth. The planting area for cuttings and nursery plants should be kept moist until the roots become established.</p> <p>If planning to sow seeds, lightly press them into the top of the soil and do not cover as light is needed for germination. Keep the seeded area lightly moist. Seeds will germinate in about two weeks.</p> <p>Greek oregano can really be harvested anytime once the plant reaches 6 inches (15 cm.) tall, but if you’re seeking the most intense flavor, you will want to harvest your oregano right before the blooms appear in mid-summer.</p> <p>When harvesting, trim each stem back leaving 4-6 pairs of leaves. This will encourage new bushy growth. The fresh leaves can be used directly in your cooking or you can hang cut stems to dry in a cool dark well-ventilated location and then store the dried leaves in sealed containers.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 2 (4 g)
15.000 Seeds Wild - Greek Oregano (Origanum Vulgare) 15 - 3
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