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Er zijn 77 producten.

Item 13-24 van 77 in totaal item(s)

Variety from Japan
Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds (Vigna angularis)

Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds...

Prijs € 1,75 SKU: VE 73 (4g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds (Vigna angularis)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 20 (4g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The adzuki bean (Vigna angularis; from the Japanese アズキ(小豆) (azuki?), sometimes transliterated as azuki or aduki, or English Red Mung Bean) is an annual vine widely grown throughout East Asia and the Himalayas for its small (approximately 5 mm) bean. The cultivars most familiar in Northeast Asia have a uniform red colour, however, white, black, gray, and variously mottled varieties also are known. Scientists presume Vigna angularis var. nipponensis is the progenitor.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Speciation and domestication</strong></p> <p>The wild ancestor of cultivated adzuki bean is probably Vigna angularis var. nipponensis,[1] which is distributed across Japan, Korea, China, Nepal and Bhutan.[2] Speciation between Vigna angularis var. nipponensis and Vigna angularis var. angularis occurred around 50,000 years ago.[3] Archaeologists estimate it was domesticated around 3000 BCE.[4] However, adzuki beans (as well as soy beans) dating from 3000 BCE to 2000 BCE are indicated to still be largely within the wild size range. Enlarged seeds occurred during the later Bronze Age or Iron Age, periods with plough use.[5] Domestication of adzuki beans resulted in a trade-off between yield and seed size. Cultivated adzuki beans have fewer but longer pods, fewer but larger seeds and a shorter stature, but also a smaller overall seed yield than wild forms. The exact place of domestication is not known, multiple domestication origins in northeast Asia (for example Japan, China, and Korea) have been suggested.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Breeding</strong></p> <p>In Japan, the adzuki bean was one of the first crops subjected to scientific plant breeding.</p> <p>Important breeding traits are yield, pureness of the bean colour and the maturing time.[6] Separate cultivars with smaller seeds and higher biomass are bred for fodder production and as green manure.[6] Locally adapted cultivars are available in China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan.[7] More than 300 cultivars/landraces/breeding lines are registered in Japan.</p> <p>Moreover, China (Institute of Crop Germplasm Resources (CAAS), Beijing, more than 3700 accessions) and Japan (Tokachi Agricultural Experiment Station, Hokkaido-ken, about 2500 accessions) accommodate large germplasm collections of adzuki bean.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Weed forms</strong></p> <p>Furthermore, also weed forms of adzuki bean are frequently occurring in Japan. The wide spread of weed forms is due to adaptation to human-disturbed habitats, escapes of old cultivars, natural establishment from derivatives of hybrids between cultivars and wild forms.[1] In contrast to wild forms, the weed forms of adzuki bean are used as a substitute for the cultivated form and consumed as sweet beans, especially if cultivated adzuki beans are attacked by pests. However, in cultivated gardens the weed form is recognized as contamination and lowers seed quality of adzuki cultivars.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Names</strong></p> <p>The name adzuki is a transliteration of the native Japanese name. Japanese also has a Chinese loanword, shōzu (小豆?), which means "small bean", its counterpart "large bean" (大豆 daizu?) being the soybean. It is common to write 小豆 in kanji but pronounce it as azuki About this sound listen (help·info), an example of jukujikun.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In China, the corresponding name (Chinese: 小豆; pinyin: xiǎodòu) still is used in botanical or agricultural parlance, however, in everyday Chinese, the more common terms are hongdou (紅豆; hóngdòu) and chidou (赤豆; chìdòu), both meaning "red bean", because almost all Chinese cultivars are uniformly red. In English-language discussions of Chinese topics, the term "red bean" often is used (especially in reference to red bean paste), but in other contexts this usage may cause confusion with other beans that also are red. In normal contexts, "red cowpeas" have been used to refer to this bean.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Korean name is pat (hangul: 팥), and in Vietnamese it is called đậu đỏ (literally: red bean). In some parts of India, they are referred to as "Red Chori".[8] In Punjabi it is called "ravaa'n" and is a common ingredient of chaat. In Marathi, it is known as Lal Chavali (लाल चवळी)- literally meaning 'red cowpea'. In Iraq its name is (لوبيا حمره) and that mean "red cowpeas".</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Cultivation</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Area and yield</strong></p> <p>The adzuki bean is mainly cultivated in China (670,000 ha), Japan (60,000 ha), South Korea (25,000 ha) and Taiwan (15,000 ha) (data published 2006).[7] Additionally, commercial growth takes place in the US, South America and India,[9] as well as New Zealand, Kongo and Angola.</p> <p>In Japan, the adzuki bean is the second most important legume after soy bean, an annual yield of around 100,000t (data published 1998) is reached.[6] With a consumption of about 140,000 t/year (data published 2006), Japan is as well the most important importer of adzuki bean.[7] The imports are received from China, Korea, Columbia, Taiwan, US, Thailand and Canada.</p> <p>The bean yields per area spread over a broad range due to differing cultivation intensity. Amounts of 4 to 8 dt/ha are reported. But in Japan and China also bean yields between 20 and 30 dt/ha are reached.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Ecological requirements</strong></p> <p>Optimal temperature range for adzuki bean growth is between 15 °C and 30 °C. The crop is not frost-hardy and needs soil temperatures above 6-10 °C (30°-34 °C optimal) for germination. Hot temperatures stimulate vegetative growth and are therefore less favorable for pea production.[6][7][9] The adzuki bean is usually not irrigated. Annual rainfall ranges from 500–1750 mm in areas where the bean is grown. The plant can withstand drought but severe reduction in yield is expected.[6][7] The cultivation of the adzuki bean is possible on preferably well drained soils with pH 5-7.5.[7][9] Fertilizer application differs widely depending on expected yield but is generally similar to soybean. Due to nodulation with rhizobia nitrogen fixation of up to 100 kg/ha is possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Production</strong></p> <p>The sowing of the peas is in 2–3 cm depth in rows 30–90 cm apart and 10–45 cm within the row. Rarely seeds are sown by broadcast. The amount of seeds ranges between 8–70 kg/ha. Growth of the crop is slow, therefore weed control is crucial mainly between germination and flowering. Cultivation systems differ largely among different countries. In China adzuki bean is often grown in intercrops with maize, sorghum and millet while in Japan the bean is grown in crop rotations. Harvest of the peas should not be done as long as moisture content of the seed is higher than 16%.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Pests and diseases</strong></p> <p>Fungal and bacterial diseases of the adzuki bean are powdery mildew, brown stem rot and bacterial blight. Furthermore, pests as adzuki pod worm, Japanese butterbur borer and cutworm attack the crop. Bean weevil is an important storage pest.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Botany</strong></p> <p>The description of the adzuki bean can vary between authors because there are wild [10] and cultivated forms [6] of the plant. The adzuki bean is an annual,[7][10] rarely biennial [6] bushy erect or twining herb [7][10] usually between 30 and 90 centimeters high.[10][11] There exist climbing or prostrate forms of the plant.[7] The stem is normally green [11] and sparsely pilose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Roots</strong></p> <p>The adzuki bean has a taproot type of root system that can reach a depth of 40–50 cm from the point of seed germination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Leaves</strong></p> <p>The leaves of the adzuki bean are trifoliate, pinnate and arranged alternately along the stem on a long petiole. Leaflets are ovate and about 5–10 cm long and 5–8 cm wide.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Flowers</strong></p> <p>Adzuki flowers are papilionaceous and bright yellow. The inflorescence is an axillary false raceme&nbsp;&nbsp; consisting of six&nbsp; to ten (two to twenty) flowers.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Fruits</strong></p> <p>Adzuki pods are smooth, cylindrical and thin-walled. The colour of the pods is green turning white to grey as they mature. The size is between 5–13 cm x 0.5 cm with 2 to 14 seeds per pod. Pod shatter during seed ripening and harvesting might be a difficulty under certain conditions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>The seeds are smooth and subcylindric with a length of 5.0-9.1 mm, width of 4.0-6.3 mm, thickness of 4.1-6.0 mm. The thousand kernel weight is between 50 and 200 g. There are many different seed colours from maroon to blue-black mottled with straw.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>In East Asian cuisine, the adzuki bean is commonly sweetened before eating. In particular, it often is boiled with sugar, resulting in red bean paste (anko), a very common ingredient in all of these cuisines. It also is common to add flavoring to the bean paste, such as chestnut.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Red bean paste is used in many Chinese dishes, such as tangyuan, zongzi, mooncakes, baozi, and red bean ice. It also serves as a filling in Japanese sweets such as anpan, dorayaki, imagawayaki, manjū, monaka, anmitsu, taiyaki, and daifuku. A more liquid version, using adzuki beans boiled with sugar and a pinch of salt, produces a sweet dish called red bean soup. Adzuki beans commonly are eaten sprouted, or boiled in a hot, tea-like drink. Some Asian cultures enjoy red bean paste as a filling or topping for various kinds of waffles, pastries, baked buns, or biscuits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Traditionally in Japan, rice with adzuki beans (赤飯; sekihan) is cooked for auspicious occasions. Adzuki beans are used in amanattō and ice cream with the whole bean (such as in the 'Cream &amp; Red Bean' product produced by IMEI) or as paste.</p> <p>On October 20, 2009, Pepsi Japan released an adzuki-flavored Pepsi product.</p> <p>Adzuki beans, along with butter and sugar, form the basis of the Somali supper dish cambuulo. In Gujarat, India, they are known as chori.[8] In Malaysia and Singapore, red beans are a major component of the dessert Ais kacang.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 73 (4g)
Adzuki Bean Finest Seeds (Vigna angularis)
Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed

Berggold Early Dwarf French...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: VE 59 (5g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean with white seeds.&nbsp; The plant is approximately 2 feet tall grows vigorously and produces yellow, stringless, meaty, straight pods about 11-13 cm long.</p> <p class="">Berggold is part of the Phaseolus genus and is a Bean variety. Its scientific name is Phaseolus vulgaris 'Berggold'. 'Berggold' is considered a OP (open polliated) cultivar. This variety is an Vegetable that typically grows as an Annual/Perennial, which is defined as a plant that can matures and completes its lifecycle over the course of one year or more.</p> <p>Typically, Berggold Bean is normally fairly low maintenance and can thus be quite easy to grow - only a basic level of care is required throughout the year to ensure it thrives. Being aware of the basic growing conditions this plant likes (soil, sun and water) will result in a strong and vibrant plant.</p>
VE 59 (5g)
Berggold Early Dwarf French Bean Seed

Variety from France
French Beans Seeds DUBBELE WITTE

French Beans Seeds DUBBELE...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: VE 144 (2g)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>French Beans Seeds DUBBELE WITTE</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Dubbele Witte is an early, stringless, tasty bush bean with good yields and approximately 14 - 15 cm medium length, green pods. The variety is suitable for fresh consumption as well as for wet preservation. The bush beans can be cooked used for salads, stews or casseroles.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 144 (2g)
French Beans Seeds DUBBELE WITTE

Variety from Italy
Borlotto Lingua Di Fuoco Nano Bean Seeds (Bush)

Borlotto Lingua Di Fuoco...

Prijs € 1,95 SKU: VE 146 (5.5g)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Borlotto Lingua Di Fuoco Nano Bean Seeds (dwarf)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Borlotto Lingua di Fuoco (traditional Italian variety) sounds more like an opera with aphrodisiac qualities rather than one of the eldest varieties of Borlotto bean.</p> <p>Lingua di Fuoco literally translates as ‘Tongue of Fire’.</p> <p>Borlotto Lingua Di Fuoco' is a mid-early Bean, with a long, inflated pod containing seven cream coloured beans. The height of the plant is 45-50 centimetres and the pods themselves have a length of 14-15 cm. The grains are large and easily removed from the pods.</p> <p>Loved for their excellent flavour, colour and versatility, Borlotto is the most commonly used heritage bean in Italy for cooking, they are basically the Italian version of kidney beans. This dual-purpose variety can be eaten young in the pod either raw or cooked or can be shelled and used as a bean.</p> <p>The pods look wonderful in the garden and are stunning chopped into salads. Its gorgeous colour is almost whimsical as you break open the pods to retrieve the plump beans inside. With a creamy taste and a soft nutty consistency, it is quite the most beautiful bean in the world.</p> <p><strong>Where to grow:</strong></p> <p>Borlotto beans are grown just like runner beans. They prefer to grow in moist, fertile soil in a sunny, sheltered spot away from strong winds. Prepare the soil for planting by digging over and adding plenty of organic material, this will help to improve the soil's moisture-retaining ability and fertility.</p> <p>Beans can also be grown in pots. Choose pots at least 45cm (18in) in diameter and make sure there are plenty of drainage holes. Fill with a mixture of equal parts loam-based compost and loam-free compost.</p> <p><strong>Supporting plants:</strong></p> <p>If you wish to train the plant vertically, create support before planting. Either make a wigwam with canes, lashed together with string at the top, or create a parallel row of canes, which have their tops tightly secured to a horizontal cane. Add to the ornamental appeal of wigwams by planting a few fragrant sweetpeas alongside them. These will twine together as they climb, attracting pollinating insects to the beans, and providing flowers to pick at the same time as the crop</p> <p>Sowing: Sow indoors late April and May, outdoors in late May to June.</p> <p>Even when temperatures are not below freezing, cold air can damage bean plants, so don't plant too early. Plant outdoors only after the last frosts, May onwards. Sowing seeds early indoors gives a faster and more reliable germination rate. Beans sown directly outside often germinate poorly or get attacked by slugs.</p> <p>Avoid problems by sowing seeds in late April and May in pots or root trainers in the greenhouse. Robust young plants will be ready to plant outside within about 5 weeks, growing away far quicker than outdoor sowings.</p> <p>Sow a single bean seed, 4cm (1.5in) deep, in root trainers or into a 7.5cm (3in) pot filled with multipurpose compost. Water well, label and place on a sunny windowsill to germinate. Seedlings will be ready to plant out after about three weeks. Before planting, put in a cold frame to acclimatise.</p> <p>Alternatively, beans can be sown directly in the soil between the second half of May and the middle of June. Plant two seeds next to your support about 5cm (2in) deep. Water well. After germination remove the smaller and less robust of the two young plants. As they grow, ensure the plants continue to twine around their canes.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation:</strong></p> <p>Having shallow roots regular and plentiful watering is vital. Whilst they will prove drought tolerant, beans should be watered particularly heavily, twice a week in dry weather, both when the flower buds appear and once they're open, ensure maximum pod development. Mulch when conditions are dry.</p> <p>Don’t hoe around bean plants too deeply or you may damage the roots.</p> <p>Beans capture nitrogen from the air, so make sure the soil contains the other essential ingredients, phosphorus and potassium. So for the fertiliser use something like 10-20-10. They leave the soil nitrogen-enriched even after harvest</p> <p><strong>Harvesting: 55 days</strong></p> <p>Ready for harvesting as green pods after 55 days, or shelling semi-dry after 70 to 80 days. The more you pick, the more they produce. Most should bear pods from late July and cropping of all types can continue until the first frosts, or longer if plants are protected.</p> <p>Leave the pods on the plant until the shells have changed colour from green to a fully white and red colour. Check that beans inside have turned from green to similar colour to shells. Harvest and shell the beans</p> <p><strong>Storing:</strong></p> <p>The beans will store best if you remove the pods, spread them on trays and place them in a warm dry room for a few days to dry out completely before storing them in clean jars in a cool dry place. Discard any that are discoloured or damaged. The beans will then keep for a few years. Check them over periodically to make sure no insects have got in as you would with any store cupboard food.</p> <p>To cook the dried beans, they will need soaking first, they are best left overnight in a big bowl of water. While the soaking is not strictly necessary, it shortens cooking time and results in more evenly textured beans. In addition, discarding one or more batches of soaking water leaches out hard-to-digest complex sugars that can cause flatulence.</p> <p>Before using in a recipe, boil the soaked beans for at least 45 minutes, or boil for ten minutes, tip off the water and add fresh water, then bring to the boil again and boil for at least another 30 to 45 minutes. Don’t add salt to these first boilings as it can make the beans rather hard.</p> <p><strong>Origin:</strong></p> <p>Phaseolus vulgaris, the common bean, is a herbaceous annual plant domesticated in the ancient Andes and now grown worldwide for its edible bean, popular both dry and as a green bean. The leaf is occasionally used as a leaf vegetable, and the straw is used for fodder.</p> <p>The common bean is a highly variable species with a long history. Bush varieties form erect bushes 20 to 60cm (8 to 24in) tall, while pole or running varieties form vines 180 to 270cm (6 to 9ft) tall.</p> <p><strong>Nomenclature:</strong></p> <p>Borlotto beans are known as Saluggia Beans or Salugia in Piedmontese.</p> <p>Saluggia is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Vercelli in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 30 km northeast of Turin, it is renowned in Italy and abroad for the production of beans.</p> <p>In poorer areas of Italy where meat dishes were few and far between, beans were known as 'carne dei poveri’ meaning ‘the meat of the poor’. Funny how times change!</p> <p>Occasionally they are referred to as cranberry beans, from their mottled cranberry-red and ivory markings.</p> <p><strong>Translation:</strong></p> <p>In Italian, Borlotto is the singular form, while Borlotti is plural</p> <p>Fagiolo means bean, while Fagioli means beans.</p> <p>Nano means 'dwarf' and is the singular form, while Nani is plural</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 146 (5.5g)
Borlotto Lingua Di Fuoco Nano Bean Seeds (Bush)
Bush Bean Seeds SUPERNANO GIALLO

Bush Bean Seeds SUPERNANO...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: VE 136 (4,5g)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Bush Bean Seeds SUPERNANO GIALLO</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 (4,5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This is considered the finest of the golden yellow bush Romano/Marconi beans, and something of a 'bush' version of Marvel of Venice. Black seeded. Strong growth in nicely compact plants, rich flavor, smooth texture. &nbsp;Sweet and tender.</p> <p>Botanical Name: Phaseolus vulgaris</p> <p>Est. Maturity: 59 days</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 136 (4,5g)
Bush Bean Seeds SUPERNANO GIALLO
BLACK TURTLE BEAN Seeds

BLACK TURTLE BEAN Seeds

Prijs € 1,55 SKU: VE 52 (4g)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>BLACK TURTLE BEAN Seeds</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 (3,5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The black turtle bean is a small, shiny variety of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), especially popular in Latin American cuisine, though it can also be found in Cajun and Creole cuisines of south Louisiana. Black beans (and all common beans) are native to the Americas, but have been introduced around the world. They are also used in Punjabi cuisine. In Punjabi, they are known as maa ki daal, but are used interchangeably with vigna mungo in countries such as the USA . They are often called simply black beans (frijoles negros, zaragoza, judía negra, poroto negro, caraota o habichuela negra in Spanish, and feijão preto in Portuguese), although this can cause confusion with other black beans.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p>The black turtle bean has a dense, meaty texture, which makes it popular in vegetarian dishes, such as frijoles negros and the Mexican-American black bean burrito. It is a very popular bean in various regions of Brazil, and is used in the national dish, feijoada. It is also a main ingredient of Moros y Cristianos in Cuba, is a must-have in the typical gallo pinto of Costa Rica and Nicaragua, is a fundamental part of pabellón criollo in Venezuela, and is served in almost all of Latin America, as well as many Hispanic enclaves in the United States. In the Dominican Republic cuisine, it is also used for a variation of the Moros y Cristianos simply called Moro de habichuelas negras. The black turtle bean is also popular as a soup ingredient. In Cuba, black bean soup is a traditional dish, usually served with white rice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It is also common to keep the boiled water of these beans (which acquires a black coloring) and consume it as a soup with other ingredients for seasoning (known as sopa negra, black soup), as a broth (caldo de frijol, bean broth) or to season or color other dishes (aforementioned gallo pinto, for example).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Samples of black turtle beans were reported in 2006 to contain total anthocyanins in their dried seed coats of 0−2.78 mg/g.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 52 (4g)
BLACK TURTLE BEAN Seeds
WINGED BEAN Seeds

WINGED BEAN Seeds...

Prijs € 2,20 SKU: VE 186
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>WINGED BEAN Seeds (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f70000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus), also known as the Goa bean, asparagus pea, four-angled bean, four-cornered bean, Manila bean, Mauritius bean, and winged pea, is a tropical legume plant native to New Guinea. It grows abundantly in hot, humid equatorial countries, from the Philippines and Indonesia to India, Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka. It is widely known, yet grown on a small scale in Southeast Asia and Papua New Guinea. Winged bean is well-recognized by farmers and consumers in the Asian region for its variety of uses and disease tolerance. Winged bean is nutrient-rich, and all parts of the plant are edible. Leaves can be eaten like spinach, flowers can be used in salads, tubers can be eaten raw or cooked, seeds can be used in similar ways as the soybean. The winged bean is an underutilized species but has the potential to become a major multi-use food crop in the tropics of Asia, Africa and Latin America.</p> <p> </p> <p>The winged bean is a species that belongs to the genus Psophocarpus, a genus of 6-9 varying species. Species in the Psophocarpus genus are perennial herbs grown as annuals. They are generally considered to be from Africa. Species in the Psophocarpus species are capable of climbing by twining their stems around a support. Species in the Psophocarpus genus have tuberous roots and pods with wings.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Appearance</strong></p> <p>The winged bean plant grows as a vine with climbing stems and leaves, 3–4 m in height. It is an herbaceous perennial, but can be grown as an annual. It is generally taller and notably larger than the Common bean. The bean pod is typically 15–22 cm (6–9 in) long and has four wings with frilly edges running lengthwise. The skin is waxy and the flesh partially translucent in the young pods. When the pod is fully ripe, it turns an ash-brown color and splits open to release the seeds. The large flower is a pale blue. The beans themselves are similar to soybeans in both use and nutritional content (being 29.8% to 39% protein).</p> <p> </p> <p>There is abundant variation in the appearance of winged bean. The shape of its leaves ranges from ovate, deltoid, ovate-lanceolate, lanceolate and long lanceolate. The leaves of winged bean also vary in colour appearing as different shades of green.</p> <p> </p> <p>Stem colour is commonly green, but can vary from shades of green to shades of purple.</p> <p> </p> <p>Pod shape is most commonly rectangular, but can also appear flat. Pod colour may also vary from shades of cream, green, pink or purple. The exterior surface of the pod also varies in texture. Pods can appear smooth or rough depending on genotype. Seed shape is often round, but oval and rectangular seeds are also found. Seed colour changes based on environmental factors and storage conditions. Seeds may appear white, cream, brown or dark tan in appearance. The shape of winged bean tuberous roots also show variation.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Human consumption and nutrition</strong></p> <p>One of the advantages of the winged bean is its ability to produce food from many different parts of the plant.</p> <p> </p> <p>Pods- Can be eaten unripe as a crunchy vegetable, cooked or raw</p> <p> </p> <p>Seeds- Require cooking for 2–3 hours to destroy trypsin inhibitors and hemagglutinins that inhibit digestion.[4] Seeds can be roasted like peanuts and have nutrient value comparative to soy beans. Average about 35% protein and 17% oil.</p> <p> </p> <p>Roots-Can be eaten raw or cooked. Tubers are high in protein and nutrient rich. Tuberous roots have 20% protein, which is much higher than other edible roots.</p> <p> </p> <p>Leaves and Flowers- Can be eaten raw or cooked. Flowers and leaves also have a high protein content at 10-15%.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Germination</strong></p> <p>Winged bean is a self-pollinating plant but mutations and occasional outcrossing, may produce variations in the species. The pretreatment of winged bean seeds is not required in tropical climate, but scarification of seeds has shown to enhance the germination rate of seedlings. Seed soaking may also increase speed to germination, as is typical, and may be used in conjunction with scarification. Seedlings under natural field conditions have been reported to emerge between 5–7 days.</p> <p> </p> <p>It is recorded that winged bean can grow as fast or faster than comparative legume plants including soybeans. There is a 40-140 day period of germination from sowing to flowering of the winged bean plant. The pod reaches its full length and can be gathered to use as a vegetable 2 weeks after pollination. Three weeks after pollination, the pod becomes fibrous and after six weeks mature seeds can be harvested. Tuber development and flower production are dependent upon genotype and environmental factors. Some varieties of winged bean do not produce tuberous roots. The winged bean is a tropical plant, and will only flower when the day length is shorter than 12 hours, though some varieties have been reported as day-length neutral. All varieties of winged bean grow on a vine and must grow over a support. Some examples of support systems include: growing against exterior walls of houses, huts, buildings; supporting against larger perennial trees; stakes placed in the ground vertically; and structures made from posts and wires.</p> <p> </p> <p>Because the early growth of winged bean is slow, it is important to maintain weeds. Slow early growth makes winged bean susceptible to weed competition in the first 4–6 weeks of development. Khan (1982) recommends weeding by hand or animal drawn tractor two times before the support system of the winged bean is established.</p> <p> </p> <p>Winged bean can be grown without added fertilizer as the plant has a bacterium on the nodules of the roots that fixes nitrogen and allows the plant to absorb nitrogen. Factors that influence nitrogen fixation include, Rhizobium strain, interactions between strain and host genotype, available nutrients and soil pH.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Climate</strong></p> <p>Winged bean thrives in hot weather and favours humidity, but it is an adaptable plant. It is reported that the winged bean can adjust to the climate of the equatorial tropics. Winged bean production is optimal in humidity, but the species is susceptible to moisture stress and waterlogging. Ideal growing temperature is reported to be 25 degrees Celsius. Lower temperature is reported to suppress germination, and extremely high temperatures are detrimental to the yield of the plant.</p> <p> </p> <p>Moderate variations in the growing climate of winged bean can result in variations in yield. It is reported than growing winged bean in lower than favourable temperatures can increase tuber production. It is also reported that leaf expansion rate is higher in a warmer climate. In addition to adequate temperature, winged bean requires sufficient soil moisture at all stages of growth to produce high yields. Although the winged bean plant is indigenous to the humid tropics, it is possible for the plant to succeed in drier climate with plenty of irrigation. Success has been noted when the maturity of the plant and the drier part of the growing season correspond.</p> <p> </p> <p>The hot, humid, and relatively wet summers of the Mid-Atlantic/Northeast are sufficient to raise the plant to crop, though the shorter growing season and day-length flowering issues will restrict the timing and amounts of yields.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>This bean has been called the "one species supermarket" because practically all of the plant is edible. The beans are used as a vegetable, but the other parts (leaves, flowers, and tuberous roots) are also edible. The tender pods, which are the most widely eaten part of the plant (and best eaten when under 1" in length), can be harvested within two to three months of planting. The flowers are often used to color rice and pastries. The flavor of the beans has a similarity to asparagus. The young leaves can be picked and prepared as a leaf vegetable, similar to spinach. The roots can be used as a root vegetable, similar to the potato, and have a nutty flavor; they are also much richer in protein than potatoes. The dried seeds can be useful as a flour and also to make a coffee-like drink. Each of these parts of the winged bean provide a source of vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, iron, and other vitamins. The seeds contain 35% protein and 18% oil.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Potential</strong></p> <p>The winged bean is rich in protein and tocopherol, an antioxidant that increases vitamin A use in the body (National Research Council (U.S), 1975). Its ability to grow in heavy rainfall makes the species a good candidate to adequately nourish the people of tropical equatorial countries in Africa. The wing bean can also be used to produce winged bean milk made from water, winged beans, and emulsifier. Winged bean milk has similar characteristics as soymilk without the same bean-rich flavour. Winged bean has also been reported as an effective remedy for smallpox and as a cure for vertigo in Malaya.</p> <p> </p> <p>The winged bean also provides many opportunities for economic benefit. Many parts of the winged bean can be sold. Mature seeds can bring in a high price . There is evidence of smoked pods, uncooked tubers, cooked tubers, dry seeds, and leaves being sold in domestic markets in South East and South Asia. Winged bean also has the potential to be used as animal feed for livestock and poultry. The winged bean also has the potential to be used as a replacement for fish meal used to raise African catfish (Clarias gariepinus), a highly valued food fish in Africa. Feeding fish represents a large portion of operating cost for fish farmers and fishmeal is scarce and high-priced. Winged bean can be used as the primary protein source for fish feed to reduce farmer dependence on fish meal availability.</p> <p> </p> <p>Winged bean also shows potential as a cover crop and a restorative crop. Planting winged bean uniform with the ground can reduce weeds and function well as a cover crop. The winged bean can also function effectively as a restorative crop that can improve nutrient poor soil with nitrogen when it is turned over into the soil.</p> </div>
VE 186 (5 S)
WINGED BEAN Seeds
“Pinto” Bean Seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris) 2 - 3

Pinto Bean Seeds (Phaseolus...

Prijs € 2,00 SKU: VE 141 (8g)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong>“Pinto” Bean Seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The pinto bean is a variety of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). It is the most common bean in the United States[1] and northwestern Mexico,[2] and is most often eaten whole in broth or mashed and refried. Either whole or mashed, it is a common filling for burritos. The young pods may also be harvested and cooked as green pinto beans.</p> <p>In Spanish, they are called frijol pinto, literally "speckled bean", and in South America it is known as the "poroto frutilla", literally "strawberry bean". In Portuguese, they are called feijão carioca in Brazil (literally "carioca bean") and feijão catarino in Portugal. It is named for its mottled skin (compare pinto horse), hence it is a type of mottled bean.</p> <p>This is the bean most commonly used for refried beans (fresh or canned) and in many dishes. Rice and pinto beans served with cornbread or corn tortillas are often a staple meal where meat is unavailable; the amino acids in this combination make it a complete protein source. This variety is often used in chili con carne, although the kidney bean, black bean, and many others may also be used in other locales.</p> <p>Pinto beans are commonly eaten beans in Brazilian cuisine (legumes, mainly common bean, are a staple food everywhere in the country, cultivated since 3000 BCE, along with starch-rich foods, such as rice, manioc, pasta and other wheat-based products, polenta and other corn-based products, potatoes and yams).</p> <p>In the southeastern part of the United States, pinto beans were once a staple of the people, especially during the winter months. Some churches in rural areas still sponsor "pinto bean suppers" for social gatherings and fund raisers.</p> <p>The alubia pinta alavesa, or the "Alavese pinto bean", a red variety of the pinto bean, originated in Añana,[3] a town and municipality located in the province of Álava, in the Basque Country of northern Spain. In October, the Feria de la alubia pinta alavesa (Alavese pinto bean fair) is celebrated in Pobes.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 141 (8g)
“Pinto” Bean Seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris) 2 - 3
Small Mexican red beans Seeds

Small Mexican red beans Seeds

Prijs € 1,45 SKU: VE 143 (2g)
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;" class="">Small Mexican red beans Seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Small Red Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) are a plump, round bean with a deep brick red color. This bean is about 1/2" long with a mild flavor and firm texture and holds its shape well. Small Red Beans are also know as Habichuelas and Habas Pequenos Colorados. This is a bush bean rather than a vine bean. This is the bean which is famous in the Southern dish.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 143 (2g)
Small Mexican red beans Seeds

Variety from Serbia

Pole Beans Seeds 'Cer Starozagorski'

Pole Beans Seeds Cer...

Prijs € 1,55 SKU: VE 142 (6g)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Pole Beans Seeds 'Cer Starozagorski'</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 15 (6g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>A very fine old Serbia heirloom with broad flat green pods (15cm long) and dark beans. Very early to bear and the beans are delicious picked young and cooked whole. Also used in minestrone and for fresh shelling beans This is the dark seeded variety, height 50 - 60 cm. &nbsp;58-72 days.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>GROWING TIP: All beans and peas are legumes and benefit from "inoculating" with rhizobacteria. These bacteria do the work of taking gaseous nitrogen from the air and "fixing" or concentrating it in pink root nodules which then slough off, adding nitrogen to the soil in a form other plants can take up as a nutrient. Inoculating your beans and peas will increase germination, and the health of your plants, helping them growing large roots and thus healthier plants. Growing pole beans with corn provides an extra shot of nitrogen to the corn, a wonderful natural symbiotic relationship that the Native Americans understood very well. You will see a big difference in overall results. Healthy legumes should also be turned under the soil when production ends as they are excellent green manure for your next crops.</div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 142 (6g)
Pole Beans Seeds 'Cer Starozagorski'

Variety from India
Mung Bean Seeds (Vigna radiata) 1.5 - 3

Mung Bean Seeds (Vigna...

Prijs € 1,80 SKU: VE 140 (2g)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Mung Bean Seeds (Vigna radiata)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 30 (2g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The mung bean (Vigna radiata), alternatively known as the moong bean, green gram, Lentil, but not Mungo, is a plant species in the legume family. Native to the Indian subcontinent, the mung bean is mainly cultivated today in India, China, and Southeast Asia. It is also cultivated in hot, dry regions in Southern Europe and the Southern United States. It is used as an ingredient in both savory and sweet dishes.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The English word mung is derived from the Hindi word मूंग Moong derived from the Sanskrit word मुद्ग (mudga). In Tamil it is பாசி பருப்பு (paasi paruppu). In Telugu language it is called పెసర పప్పు (Pesara pappu). In Kannada, it is ಹೆಸರು ಬೇಳೆ (hesaru bele).</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>They are one of many species recently moved from the genus Phaseolus to Vigna, and is still often seen incorrectly cited as Phaseolus aureus or Phaseolus radiatus.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Mung beans are commonly used in various cuisines across Asia.</p> <p>Whole beans and mung bean paste</p> <p>Whole cooked mung beans are generally prepared from dried beans by boiling until they are soft. Mung beans are light yellow in color when their skins are removed. Mung bean paste can be made by dehulling, cooking, and pulverizing the beans to a dry paste.</p> <p>Although whole mung beans are also occasionally used in Indian cuisine, beans without skins are more commonly used; but in Kerala, whole mung beans are commonly boiled to make a dry preparation often served with rice gruel (kanji). Dehulled mung beans can also be used in a similar fashion as whole beans for the purpose of making sweet soups. Mung beans in some regional cuisines of India are stripped of their outer coats to make mung dal. In Tamil Nadu, Telangana and Andhra Pradesh, steamed whole beans are seasoned with spices and fresh grated coconut in a preparation called sundal. In south and north Indian states, mung beans are also eaten as pancakes. They are soaked in water for six to 12 hours (the higher the temperature, the lesser soaking time). Then they are ground into fine paste along with ginger and salt. Then pancakes are made on a very hot griddle. These are usually eaten for breakfast. This provides high quality protein that is rare in most Indian regional cuisines. Pongal or kichdi is another recipe that is made with rice and mung beans without skin. In Kerala, it is commonly used to make the parippu preparation in the Travancore region (unlike Cochin and Malabar, where toor dal, tuvara parippu, is used). It is also used, with coconut milk and jaggery, to make a type of payasam.</p> <p>In Chinese cuisine, whole mung beans are used to make a tángshuǐ, or dessert, otherwise literally translated, "sugar water", called lǜdòu tángshuǐ, which is served either warm or chilled. In Indonesia, they are made into a popular dessert snack called es kacang hijau, which has the consistency of a porridge. The beans are cooked with sugar, coconut milk, and a little ginger.</p> <p>In Hong Kong, dehulled mung beans and mung bean paste are made into ice cream or frozen ice pops. Mung bean paste is used as a common filling for Chinese mooncakes in East China and Taiwan. Also in China, the boiled and shelled beans are used as filling in glutinous rice dumplings eaten during the dragon boat festival (端午节).[4] The beans may also cooked until soft, blended into a liquid, sweetened, and served as a beverage, popular in many parts of China.</p> <p>In the Philippines, ginisáng monggó (sautéed mung bean stew), also known as monggó guisado or balatong, is a savoury stew of whole mung beans with shrimp or fish. It is traditionally served on Fridays of Lent, when the majority Roman Catholic Filipinos traditionally abstain from meat. Variants of ginisáng monggó may also be made with chicken or pork.</p> <p>Mung bean paste is also a common filling of pastries known as hopia (or bakpia) popular in Indonesia, the Philippines and further afield in Guyana (where it is known as black eye cake) and originating from southern China</p> <p><strong>Bean sprouts</strong></p> <p>Mung bean sprouts are germinated by leaving them in water for four hours of daytime light and spending the rest of the day in the dark. Mung bean sprouts can be grown under artificial light for four hours over the period of a week. They are usually simply called "bean sprouts". However, when bean sprouts are called for in recipes, it generally refers to mung bean or soybean sprouts.</p> <p>Mung bean sprouts are stir-fried as a Chinese vegetable accompaniment to a meal, usually with garlic, ginger, spring onions, or pieces of salted dried fish to add flavour. Uncooked bean sprouts are used in filling for Vietnamese spring rolls, as well as a garnish for phở. They are a major ingredient in a variety of Malaysian and Peranakan cuisine, including char kway teow, hokkien mee, mee rebus, and pasembor. In Korea, slightly cooked mung bean sprouts, called sukjunamul (hangul: 숙주나물), are often served as a side dish. They are blanched (placed into boiling water for less than a minute), immediately cooled in cold water, and mixed with sesame oil, garlic, salt, and often other ingredients. In the Philippines, mung bean sprouts are made into lumpia rolls called lumpiang togue.</p> <p>In northern China and Korea, soybean sprouts, called kongnamul (hangul: 콩나물) in Korean, are more widely used in a variety of dishes.</p> <p><strong>Starch</strong></p> <p>Mung bean starch, which is extracted from ground mung beans, is used to make transparent cellophane noodles (also known as bean thread noodles, bean threads, glass noodles, fensi (粉絲), tung hoon (冬粉), miến, bún tàu, or bún tào). Cellophane noodles become soft and slippery when they are soaked in hot water. A variation of cellophane noodles, called mung bean sheets or green bean sheets, are also available. In Korea, a jelly called nokdumuk (hangul: 녹두묵; also called cheongpomuk; hangul: 청포묵) is made from mung bean starch; a similar jelly, colored yellow with the addition of gardenia coloring, is called hwangpomuk (hangul: 황포묵). In northern China, mung bean jelly is called liangfen (凉粉, meaning chilled bean jelly), which is very popular food during summer. Jidou liangfen is another flavor of mung bean jelly food in Yunnan, in southern China.</p> <p>Mung batter is used to make crepes named pesarattu in Andhra Pradesh, India and pancakes named Bindaetteok in Korea.</p> <p><strong>History of domestication and cultivation</strong></p> <p>The mung bean was domesticated in India, where its progenitor (Vigna radiata subspecies sublobata) occurs wild.[8][9] Archaeological evidence has turned up carbonized mung beans on many sites in India. Areas with early finds include the eastern zone of the Harappan civilization in Punjab and Haryana, where finds date back about 4500 years, and South India in the modern state of Karnataka where finds date back more than 4000 years. Some scholars therefore infer two separate domestications in the northwest and south of India. In South India there is evidence for evolution of larger-seeded mung beans 3500 to 3000 years ago. By about 3500 years ago mung beans were widely cultivated throughout India. Cultivated mung beans later spread from India to China and Southeast Asia. Archaeobotanical research at the site of Khao Sam Kaeo in southern Thailand indicates that mung beans had arrived in Thailand by at least 2200 years ago. Finds on Pemba Island indicate that during the era of Swahili trade, in the 9th or 10th century, mung beans also came to be cultivated in Africa.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 140 (2g)
Mung Bean Seeds (Vigna radiata) 1.5 - 3

Variety from Greece

Deze plant heeft gigantische vruchten
Fasolia Gigantes White...

Fasolia Gigantes White...

Prijs € 1,85 SKU: VE 221
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5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2 class=""><strong>Fasolia Gigantes White Beans Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Greek giant beans, are a traditional Greek food, used in several Greek gourmet recipes, such as bean soup, baked beans in the oven (butter beans), Greek salad, etc. Undoubtedly they are a healthy, natural food and favorably place themselves in a Mediterranean diet.</p> <p>Traditionally, gigandes plaki are served as a meze alongside other side dishes. However, this dish is filling enough to be eaten for lunch. This hearty meze is popular during the cold fall and winter months. As with many Greek dishes, bread is used to dip in to the tomato sauce drippings.</p> <div>Overall, gigandes plaki is a healthy and nutritious food. It is a rich source for anti-oxidants from the tomatoes, and fiber from the other vegetables, and is suitable for vegetarians and vegans if the sausages and cheese are excluded.</div> <div>These beans are 100% natural, this is not a hybrid or mutant product.</div> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 221
Fasolia Gigantes White Beans Seeds